6
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Crystal_Message
{
    class Person
    {
        private string firstName ="";
        private string lastName= "";
        private string phone="";


        public Person(string firstName, string lastName, string phone)
        {
            this.FirstName = firstName;
            this.LastName = lastName;
            this.PhoneNumber = phone;
        }

        public string FirstName
        {
            get { return firstName; }

            private set
            {
                if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value)){

                    throw new ArgumentNullException("Must Include First Name");
                }

                this.firstName = value;
            }

        }

        public string LastName
        {
            get { return lastName; }

            private set
            {
                if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value)){

                    throw new ArgumentNullException("Must Include Last Name");
                }

                this.lastName = value;
            }

        }

        public string PhoneNumber
        {
            get { return phone; }

            private set
            {
                if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value)){

                    throw new ArgumentNullException("Must Include Phone Number");
                }

                this.phone = value;
            }

        }


        public override string ToString()
        {
            return "First Name: " + this.FirstName + " " + " Last Name: " + this.LastName + " " + " Phone Number: " + this.PhoneNumber;
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            if(obj == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            Person testEquals = obj as Person;

            if((System.Object)testEquals == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            return (this.firstName == testEquals.firstName) && (this.lastName == testEquals.lastName) && (this.phone == testEquals.phone);   

        }

        /*
        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
           return 
        }
        */ 
    }
}

I was following the guidelines by MSDN. Two questions:

  1. Have I correctly implemented the equals method?
  2. Could someone show me how to implement GetHashCode Correctly for my class? MSDN does x ^ y, but I can't do it for mine.
  • 2
    Sure you can use XOR, use it on the hash code of the members. You don't have to, it isn't necessary, just return phone.GetHashCode(). That works well because everybody has a unique phone number. – Hans Passant Jun 7 '15 at 11:46
  • Thanks, how about my equals method, any improvements, or did I implement it correctly? It might become a problem, because two people might have the same number, live in the same home. – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 11:47
  • @HansPassant Not everybody has a unique phone number. Some people may choose not to enter their phone number even if they have one, others may share a phone number (company or family phone). – user743382 Jun 7 '15 at 11:50
  • 1
    Sigh. GetHashCode() does not need to be unique, only good enough. – Hans Passant Jun 7 '15 at 11:51
  • @hvd - Nice catch, how would I implement GetHashCode properly? – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 11:51
1

A more common method than a simple xor of hash codes, as posted in Filip's answer, is to use a more complicated formula to combine them. Multiply the individual fields' hash codes by different numbers, for example like so:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked
    {
        return (firstName.GetHashCode() * 33 ^ lastName.GetHashCode()) * 33 ^ phone.GetHashCode();
    }
}

(Note the unchecked keyword: integer overflow is expected here, and silent wraparound is exactly the intended behaviour.)

It probably won't make a difference for the concrete types you're dealing with, but in general, it's better. Consider a simple type containing only two integer values. Consider also that int's GetHashCode() implementation simply returns its own value. If you use a simple xor to combine the values, you will have a lot of hash collisions for normal code: the simplest example is that each pair of two identical values will produce the same hash code of zero.

The calculation here is actually the calculation that's done by Tuple<T1, T2, T3>. I didn't write it the way Microsoft did, but the actual calculations and numbers should be the same.

  • Thanks for this. Do you suggest that I do this for my other classes as well? I have an Employee class, and message class. – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 18:29
  • @Nexusfactor I think that as long as it makes it easier to verify that your implementation of GetHashCode() is correct, then there's really no reason not to do so. But if you see it as an additional complication, and your own hash code implementation is good enough, then I can certainly understand sticking with your own hash code implementation. – user743382 Jun 7 '15 at 18:31
  • Thank You very much for your time and explanation. Much appropriated. Just of of curiously, do you learn this from a tutorial/books? or school? Would love to read more about it for my own understanding. – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 18:34
  • @Nexusfactor One thing I can highly recommend is Eric Lippert's blog. He has written an entry on hash codes too, and actually specifically draws out the same problem I describe here. (Look for "In particular, be careful of "xor".") – user743382 Jun 7 '15 at 18:37
6

Well, to not run into any problems, GetHashCode should use all the members that Equals uses and vice versa.

So in your case:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return firstName.GetHashCode() ^ lastName.GetHashCode() ^ phone.GetHashCode();
}
  • I think this is a nice approach. Even if two people have the same number, the first name, and last names are different to generate a unique HashCode correct? – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 12:10
  • Do you think, just incase, I should add a private int ID, a unique id# for every person? Just incase there is a chance a person from the same house might have the same name(first and last) for example, a son might be named after is father. However, and they both have to have different ID. – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 12:31
  • Yes, it is a good practice to also have Id for these kind of classes. – Filip Jun 7 '15 at 12:37
1

Best keep in mind what the purpose of these two methods is: With equals YOU define under which circumstances two instances of your class should be treated as, well, equal. So if in your case this is given iff first name, last name and phone number are equal then this is correct. The hash method in turn is used to sort or distribute you instances e.g. in a hash map. It should be fast and good enough to avoid unwanted clustering. Therefore you often see values multiplied by a prime in hash functions. You have to guarantee that equal objects have the same hash code but not vice versa. So different objects may have the same hash code.

  • "So different objects may have the same hash code" - well in that case you can run into problems when using HashSet. Because it will call GetHashCode and assume that this object already exists in the set and won't add it. But in reality those objects aren't duplicate... – Filip Jun 7 '15 at 12:42
  • The link is in another language. – user4981830 Jun 7 '15 at 12:46
  • Sorry, I assumed that switching to Original would fix this. Apparently Microsoft prefers not to represent this choice in the URL. Fixed it. – Christoph Grimmer-Dietrich Jun 7 '15 at 12:49

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