2

Imagine a Java class with three methods:

  1. master()
  2. foo()
  3. bar()

I want to synchronize master() and foo() and also master() and bar(), without synchronizing foo() and bar(). It can be done will a separate lock for every pair of synchronized methods, but my actual code has many more than three methods so I was hoping there's a way to do it without so many lock objects.

4
  • So when master is called, foo can't be called and when master is called, bar can't be called? Jun 7, 2015 at 21:59
  • Yep. But foo and bar can be called at the same time (assuming master isn't called, of course). Jun 7, 2015 at 22:00
  • Are all methods synchronized only against master(), or can there be other combinations?
    – shmosel
    Jun 7, 2015 at 22:02
  • @BarryFruitman, should multiple threads be able to call foo() concurrently?
    – aioobe
    Jun 7, 2015 at 22:16

3 Answers 3

3

You are essentially describing a ReadWriteLock. Every two methods are allowed to run simultaneously (a "read lock"), except for master(), which excludes all others (a "write lock"):

public class MyClass {
    private final ReadWriteLock rwLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    private final Lock r = rwLock.readLock();
    private final Lock w = rwLock.writeLock();

    public void master() {
        w.lock();
        // do stuff
        w.unlock();
    }

    public void foo() {
        r.lock();
        // do stuff
        r.unlock();
    }

    public void bar() {
        r.lock();
        // do stuff
        r.unlock();
    }
}
10
  • I like this way better because it only uses two locks. Jun 7, 2015 at 22:05
  • 1
    @aioobe started out with rwLock, and then switched to rwl for some reason. Stupid typo, fixed. Thanks for noticing!
    – Mureinik
    Jun 7, 2015 at 22:08
  • Hmm.. Is this really the same thing as what OP is after? If foo should be "synchronized" it should mean that only one thread at a time should be able to call foo, right?
    – aioobe
    Jun 7, 2015 at 22:13
  • 1
    @aioobe foo() doesn't need to be synchronized on its own; OP wants to block on foo() only while master() is running.
    – shmosel
    Jun 7, 2015 at 22:22
  • You could also use a StampedLock, which is similar to a ReadWriteLock, but is not reentrant and should have better performance. Jun 7, 2015 at 22:24
1

You can use synchronized on any Object. So, you can create a separate lock for the methods:

public class Lock {
    private final Object master_foo = null;
    private final Object master_bar = null;
    public void master() {
        synchronized(master_foo) {
            synchronized(master_bar) {
                ...
            }
        }
    }

    public void foo() {
        synchronized(master_foo) {
            ...
        }
    }

    public void bar() {
        synchronized(master_bar) {
            ...
        }
    }
}
1
  • Thank you but as I said in my original question I was hoping to avoid this approach since I actually have way more than three methods. Jun 7, 2015 at 22:04
0

I would go with Mureinik's answer, but just for the heck of it, here's another way you can set up read/write synchronization (untested):

public class Test {

    private final Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(Integer.MAX_VALUE);

    public void master() {
        semaphore.acquireUninterruptibly(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
        try {
            //...
        } finally {
            semaphore.release(Integer.MAX_VALUE);
        }
    }

    public void foo() {
        semaphore.acquireUninterruptibly();
        try {
            //...
        } finally {
            semaphore.release();
        }
    }

    public void bar() {
        semaphore.acquireUninterruptibly();
        try {
            //...
        } finally {
            semaphore.release();
        }
    }

}
1
  • Interesting way of locking methods. Jun 7, 2015 at 22:32

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