7

I have a four core CPU. I create 4 threads and run a cpu intensive loop, and it takes > 4x longer than running it all procedurally in one thread.

I created two projects to compare, one with threading and one without. I'll show the code and run times. Just note the reason the project without threading looks weird is I wanted to replicate the memory overhead, because I wasn't sure how much it would effect run time. So, here's the code without threading:

class TimeTest implements Runnable {
    private Thread t;
    private String name;

    TimeTest(String name) {
        this.name = name;
        System.out.println("Creating class " + name);
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Running class " + name);

        int value = 100000000;
//        try {
            while (--value > 0) {
                Math.random();
//                Thread.sleep(1);
//                System.out.println("Class " + name + " " + value);
            }
//        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
//            System.out.println("Interrupted " + name);
//        }

        System.out.println("Class " + name + " exiting...");
    }

    public void start() {
        System.out.println("Starting class " + name);

        if (t == null) {
            t = new Thread(this, name);
//            t.start();
            this.run();
        }
    }
}

public class ThreadComp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TimeTest one = new TimeTest("Class-1");
        one.start();

        TimeTest two = new TimeTest("Class-2");
        two.start();

        TimeTest three = new TimeTest("Class-3");
        three.start();

        TimeTest four = new TimeTest("Class-4");
        four.start();
    }
}

This runs in about 11 seconds.

Here's the code with threading:

class RunnableTest implements Runnable {
    private Thread t;
    private String name;

    RunnableTest(String name) {
        this.name = name;
        System.out.println("Creating thread " + name);
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Running thread " + name);
        int value = 100000000;
//        try {
            while (--value > 0) {
                Math.random();
//                Thread.sleep(1);
//                System.out.println("Thread " + name + " " + value);
            }
//        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
//            System.out.println("Interrupted " + name);
//        }

        System.out.println("Thread " + name + " exiting...");
    }

    public void start() {
        System.out.println("Starting thread " + name);

        if (t == null) {
            t = new Thread(this, name);
            t.start();
        }
    }
}

public class ThreadTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        RunnableTest one = new RunnableTest("Thread-1");
        one.start();

        RunnableTest two = new RunnableTest("Thread-2");
        two.start();

        RunnableTest three = new RunnableTest("Thread-3");
        three.start();

        RunnableTest four = new RunnableTest("Thread-4");
        four.start();
    }    
}

This runs in about 1 minute 13 seconds.

Now, in the example I'm learning from, they call Thread.sleep during the lead for 50ms. If I do this, the threads run faster IF I also call Thread.sleep(50) on the non-threaded class.

Which is great, I know how to get it to work. But the reason I'm learning this is I'm doing pathfinding, and I'm not going to add a Sleep call on something that already takes a long time and doesn't need to pause and do nothing for even 1ms (unless it absolutely has to).

So, what I'm wondering is what am I missing? Do the threads absolutely HAVE to be put to sleep or does the object have to wait in order for them to work as I intend (i.e. running all four loops in parallel)?

Even if I'm just making a mistake, why would this take so much longer? I would think worst case scenario, it would still run in 11 seconds, it would just finish in some unforeseeable order....

4
  • 1
    so - it'll take 4 women 36 months to produce a baby? – ZhongYu Jun 7 '15 at 23:57
  • 10
    I can almost guarantee that the use of Math.random is the cause of this issue. See docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/Math.html#random-- – J Atkin Jun 8 '15 at 0:03
  • 1
    ^^ What @JAtkin says. Your code is esssentially all lock-contention. – Martin James Jun 8 '15 at 0:05
  • @bayou.io - I think you mean to ask if it will take 9 women 1 month to produce a baby ... – Stephen C Jun 8 '15 at 1:23
12

The huge difference in execution time is caused by Math.random() method. If you will dig into its implementation you will see that it uses static randomNumberGenerator that is shared across all threads. If you go one step deeper then you will notice that execution is relying on int next(int) method, which in turn using Random.seed, which is AtomicLong (consider that all threads using the same instance of Random!). And now we are coming to AtomicLong, which is implemented through optimistic locking - and that is the issue. Optimistic locks are not designed for high load, they greatly suffer when multiple threads trying to access them simultaneously, that's the performance drop you are observing.

TL;DR: Use ThreadLocalRandom (thanks to @bayou.io for mentioning this) and enjoy the performance boost.

2
  • 2
    ThreadLocalRandom - docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… – kervin Jun 8 '15 at 0:10
  • That did it. Without threading, 1999000000 nextFloat()s takes 5 seconds. With threading 2 (ed: actually 5 seconds may have been a fluke) seconds. In fact, that's surprising to me because I thought it would still take 5 seconds for all four to finish. But i'll take it. What chaps my hide is I only chose Math.random() because I needed something with enough overhead but was afraid printing to the console would force it all back to one thread. Anyway, thanks. – user1844160 Jun 8 '15 at 1:40
2

Your problem is that you are you are using Math.random(). The docs on this method:

...

This method is properly synchronized to allow correct use by more than one thread. However, if many threads need to generate pseudorandom numbers at a great rate, it may reduce contention for each thread to have its own pseudorandom-number generator.

(emphasis mine)

So the solution is to create a new Random for each thread.

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