16

I am using System.Net.Http's HttpClient to call a REST API with "POST" using the following code:

using (HttpRequestMessage requestMessage = new HttpRequestMessage(
                                           HttpMethod.Post, new Uri(request)) { })
{
     response = await httpClient.PostAsync(request, objectContent);
}

The "objectContent" is currently this -

objectContent = new ObjectContent(jsonContent.GetType(),
                                  jsonContent,
                                  new JsonMediaTypeFormatter());

I was wondering what difference it makes if this was a StringContent rather than an ObjectContent like this?

objectContent = new StringContent(content);
objectContent.Headers.ContentType = MediaTypeHeaderValue.Parse("application/json");

Both work fine. Because it is JSON, i tend to assume that StringContent would make sense. But when is ObjectContent to be used because pretty much all content sent is a "string".

16

I was wondering what difference it makes if this was a StringContent rather than an ObjectContent like this?

In your example there won't be any difference. ObjectContent simply allows a "wider" range of types to be sent via HttpClient, while StringContent is narrower for string values only, such as JSON.

StringContent is a slim wrapper around ByteArrayContent, and actually stores the value passed as a byte[]. You simply get the benefit of not needing to transform your string back and forth.

Edit:

Given the fact that you're posting a JSON, you can even make it less verbose by using HttpClientExtensions.PostAsJsonAsync<T>:

await httpClient.PostAsJsonAsync(url, json);
| improve this answer | |
  • Makes sense. In my case, the response is always expected to be "application/json" from the REST APIs and hence I would go with StringContent – Lalman Jun 8 '15 at 8:59
  • @Patrick - Thanks for highlighting. I missed and was responding with a comment. – Lalman Jun 8 '15 at 9:00
  • 1
    @Lalman Perhaps PostAsJsonAsync would be an even better, less verbose approach to posting a JSON. See my edit. – Yuval Itzchakov Jun 8 '15 at 9:02
  • I'm having issues with PostAsJsonAsync since it's not including Content-Length for the ObjectContent. My Json data isn't actually posting to the API. It's posting over with Chunked transfer encoding. Any suggestions (outside of reverting to StringContent)? – Kevin Sep 25 '18 at 21:09
2

If someone will search how to send request by PostAsync in .NET Core 2.1: I did not found PostAsJsonAsync method in HttpClient, but your solution with setting:

objectContent = new StringContent(content);
objectContent.Headers.ContentType = MediaTypeHeaderValue.Parse("application/json");

"do the job" perfectly also in .NET Core.

Edit:

Additionally If you want add your own header you can type:

objectContent.Headers.Add("Your header", "Value");
| improve this answer | |
0

ObjectContent is used to format more complex Mime types using built-in or custom-written formatters. It is OK to use ObjectContent for a simple string as well, it doesn't make much difference except for the performance which (IMHO and not checked) may be better with StringContent, since it may have been optimized specifically for strings

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Denis. I would be running a performance test to ascertain performance difference, if there is any! – Lalman Jun 8 '15 at 8:57
  • I wish you would have written how to use simple string as ObjectContent as well. Just found myself trying to use a generic function that creates the HTTPRequestMessage with ObjectContent and a JsonMediaTypeFormatter: new ObjectContent<TValue>(value, jsonFormatter);. But when passed a pre-serialized json string as value, it messes up the string by adding a bunch of "\". Anyhow, my search goes on. – micnil Jun 8 '18 at 11:46
  • @micnil when using ObjectContent you pass a jsonFormatter. In your case the one you passed adds the "\". So you can either pass a non-serialized object which will be serialized by the formatter, or change the formatter to another one that won't add the "\". – Oram Mar 18 '19 at 7:31

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