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I am currently converting functions in the DAL of an old app to a new app using Entity Framework/LINQ in its DAL.

There are some instances where I would like to directly pass a string of sql to the database. Is this possible when using LINQ? Here is what I tried atfer research but ExecuteQuery is not available.

    using (var context = new DbContext())
    {
      var sql = @"SELECT DISTINCT * FROM Customer where CustomerId = {0}";
      sql = string.Format(sql, customerId);
      var query = DbContext.ExecuteQuery<Customer>(sql);
      return query.ToList();
    }

Doing this seems pretty straight forward but ExecuteQuery is not available to me.

Here is my next attempt at it which seems much better: (please tell me if there is a better way)

StringBuilder sql = new StringBuilder();

sql.AppendLine("SELECT * FROM CUSTOMERS ");
sql.AppendLine("WHERE @CustomerId = null OR CustomerId = @CustomerId ");
sql.AppendLine("AND @CustomerName = null OR CustomerName = @CustomerName ");


var customerList = context.Customers.SqlQuery(sql.ToString(),
                                                 new SqlParameter("@CustomerId", customerId),
                                                 new SqlParameter("@CustomerName", customerName)).ToList();
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2

Although for your current condition you can use LINQ.

var customer = context.Customers.Where(c => c.CustomerId = id).Distinct();

This is how you do it Entity Framework Raw SQL Queries

Sending raw commands to the database

using (var context = new DbContext()) 
{ 
    context.Database.SqlCommand( 
        "UPDATE dbo.Blogs SET Name = 'Another Name' WHERE BlogId = 1"); 
}

Writing SQL queries for entities

using (var context = new DbContext()) 
{ 
    var customers = context.Customers.SqlQuery("SELECT * FROM dbo.Customers").ToList(); 
}

Loading entities from stored procedures

using (var context = new DbContext()) 
{ 
    var customers = context.Blogs.SqlQuery("dbo.GE_Customers").ToList(); 
}

Writing SQL queries for non-entity types

using (var context = new DbContext()) 
{ 
    var customerNames = context.Database.SqlQuery<string>( 
                       "SELECT Name FROM dbo.Customers").ToList(); 
}

Update to answer

You do not need to pass SqlParameter, simply pass the default objects

I think the code below should work fine.

var customerList = context.Customers.SqlQuery(sql.ToString(), customerId, customerName).ToList(); 

if your real query is

sql.AppendLine("SELECT * FROM CUSTOMERS ");
sql.AppendLine("WHERE @CustomerId = null OR CustomerId = @CustomerId ");
sql.AppendLine("AND @CustomerName = null OR CustomerName = @CustomerName ");

I would suggest you to do it this way

var customers = context.Costomers; // this does not populates the result yet

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(customerId))
{
    customers = customers.Where(c => c.CustomerId = customerId); // this does not populates the result yet
}

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(customerName))
{
    customers = customers.Where(c => c.CustomerName = customerName); // this does not populates the result yet
}

// finally execute the query
var custList = customers.ToList();
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  • Phenominal answer. Not sure how I didn't find something like this in any documentation the past 2 hours. – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 18:58
  • @JTunney - i remember the first time i had same frustration, then one of my co-worker shared the link, been in my bookmarks since then. – Parimal Raj Jun 8 '15 at 18:59
  • Do you know a good way to pass params to one of these queries without using string.format? – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 20:51
  • I added to my post of how I am doing it. Do you know of a better way? – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 20:58
  • @JTunney do read method description once msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg696525%28v=vs.113%29.aspx Any parameter values you supply will automatically be converted to a DbParameter. – Parimal Raj Jun 8 '15 at 21:32
2

If there is not limitation or requirement don't use this kind of queries they are vulnerable to sql inject attacks.

You can do nearly every sentence with Entity Framework using linq, like the one you wrote

DbContext.Customer.Where(c => c.CustomerId = id).Distinct();

It's more readable, and more secure.

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  • I like this answer. I think the OP of the question should consider this approach heavily. If they are converting to EF, it makes sense to truly leverage what EF has to offer (instead of doing old DAL practices in a new ORM). – Michael Jun 8 '15 at 18:58
  • I'm aware of this, almost everything in my app is done in linq. I just put a simple example in here rather than the huge query I am actually trying to avoid writing in linq. – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 18:59
  • If time is against you and some of the DAL queries your converting are 1000's of lines wouldn't you do the same? – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 19:00
  • @JTunney It depends, I would try to do all I can with liqn. And If I were you, after this rush. I would move the raw sql to Linq, because It's a weak code. If any developer change any properties of your POCO's, It's easy to forget that there is raw Sql affected and compiler is not gonna advice you in this case. – Marc Cals Jun 8 '15 at 19:07
  • 1
    I'm right with you. My plan is to go back once everything is operational and make pretty much everything use LINQ or at least stored procs. I actually ended up going the stored proc route with this past function since using string.format was just terrible looking for the 8 params that I had. – JTunney Jun 8 '15 at 19:44
1

You can use SqlQuery, but it would be better to pass the parameter instead of using Format:

  var sql = @"SELECT DISTINCT * FROM Customer where CustomerId = {0}";
  var query = DbContext.SqlSuery<Customer>(sql, customerId);

That way, the parameters are SQL encoded so as not to allow for SQL Injection.

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