882

I want to be able to call the following method after a specified delay. In objective c there was something like:

[self performSelector:@selector(DoSomething) withObject:nil afterDelay:5];

Is there an equivalent of this method in android with java? For example I need to be able to call a method after 5 seconds.

public void DoSomething()
{
     //do something here
}
0

35 Answers 35

2126

Kotlin

Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).postDelayed({
    //Do something after 100ms
}, 100)

Java

final Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Do something after 100ms
    }
}, 100);

28
  • 113
    This solution is usefull only on UI thread. Otherwise on normal thread, you need to implement looper which is not the best version I think Jan 10, 2013 at 14:59
  • 3
    @olivier_sdg why do you need to implement looper?
    – djechlin
    Mar 13, 2013 at 16:37
  • 40
    @djechlin A Handler must always be linked to a Looper, which will actually process the Runnable you post(). The UI thread already comes with a Looper, so you can just make a new Handler() on the UI thread and post() Runnables directly to it. These Runnables execute on the UI thread. To have Runnables execute on another thread, you need to make a new thread, then Looper.prepare(), make a new Handler() and then Looper.loop(). Any Runnables posted to this new Handler will execute on this new thread. If you don't do all this, the post() will throw an exception.
    – Dororo
    Mar 25, 2013 at 21:48
  • 14
    In case you need to, you can also cancel the execution as long as the Runnable is still in the message queue by calling removeCallbacks(Runnable r) on the Handler.
    – Dennis
    May 27, 2014 at 12:24
  • 12
    should import android.os.handler
    – KaKa
    Aug 16, 2016 at 8:03
364

I couldn't use any of the other answers in my case. I used the native java Timer instead.

new Timer().schedule(new TimerTask() {          
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // this code will be executed after 2 seconds       
    }
}, 2000);
9
  • 48
    this is better than the ones that use Handler, because it doesn't have Looper issues when the Handler is not run on the UI thread.
    – Ben H
    Jun 27, 2013 at 19:26
  • 33
    You should keep a reference to your timer in order to cancel it when it's not needed anymore since according to the Android doc: "When a timer is no longer needed, users should call cancel(), which releases the timer's thread and other resources. Timers not explicitly cancelled may hold resources indefinitely."
    – Pooks
    Jul 29, 2014 at 8:46
  • 17
    Attention! This doesn't run on UI thread. Running this on ui thread caused a Fatal Error: android.view.ViewRootImpl$CalledFromWrongThreadException: Only the original thread that created a view hierarchy can touch its views.
    – vovahost
    Oct 28, 2015 at 11:29
  • 15
    @vovahost that's only because you are updating UI components inside the timer block
    – Tim
    Oct 28, 2015 at 11:58
  • 10
    Note that java.util.Timer (and TimerTask) will be deprecated in JDK 9. TimerTask creates new Threads for tasks which is not very good. Jun 10, 2017 at 17:23
188

Note: This answer was given when the question didn't specify Android as the context. For an answer specific to the Android UI thread look here.


It looks like the Mac OS API lets the current thread continue, and schedules the task to run asynchronously. In the Java, the equivalent function is provided by the java.util.concurrent package. I'm not sure what limitations Android might impose.

private static final ScheduledExecutorService worker = 
  Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

void someMethod() {
  ⋮
  Runnable task = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
      /* Do something… */
    }
  };
  worker.schedule(task, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  ⋮
}
9
  • 3
    This never calls the Runnable for me
    – Ky.
    Mar 17, 2014 at 18:25
  • 14
    As a side note: This also allows you to cancel the task later, which might be helpful in some situations. Simply store a reference to the ScheduledFuture<?> returned by worker.schedule() and call its cancel(boolean) method.
    – Dennis
    May 27, 2014 at 12:14
  • I think this answer is outdated. .schedule doesn't seem to be a method of Runnable any longer...? :/
    – beetree
    Jan 2, 2015 at 0:20
  • 5
    @beetree it's a method on ScheduledExecutorService.
    – erickson
    Jan 2, 2015 at 1:01
  • 4
    This does not work if ui thread objects are involved you must call runOnUIThread(new runnable(){ run()....}); or post a runnable using handler object from inside the run(){ } Mar 1, 2016 at 10:36
116

For executing something in the UI Thread after 5 seconds:

new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Do something here
    }
}, 5000);
3
  • 8
    Confirm, this is the best solution to prevent the call to looper.prepare and to place the whole thing into the UI thread.
    – Tobliug
    Mar 18, 2015 at 2:28
  • Thanks for this, helped me with Looper issues :)
    – Tia
    Mar 27, 2018 at 18:07
  • 1
    I would be careful about creating a handler on main looper, then in this thread no long-time task should be done Aug 16, 2018 at 21:52
47

Kotlin & Java Many Ways

1. Using Handler

Handler().postDelayed({
    TODO("Do something")
    }, 2000)

2. Using TimerTask

Timer().schedule(object : TimerTask() {
    override fun run() {
        TODO("Do something")
    }
}, 2000)

Or even shorter

Timer().schedule(timerTask {
    TODO("Do something")
}, 2000)

Or shortest would be

Timer().schedule(2000) {
    TODO("Do something")
}

3. Using Executors

Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor().schedule({
    TODO("Do something")
}, 2, TimeUnit.SECONDS)

In Java

1. Using Handler

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Do something
    }
}, 2000);

2. Using Timer

new Timer().schedule(new TimerTask() {          
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Do something
    }
}, 2000);

3. Using ScheduledExecutorService

private static final ScheduledExecutorService worker = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

Runnable runnable = new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
      // Do something
  }
  };
worker.schedule(runnable, 2, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
2
  • 1
    @JanRabe Thanks for your suggestion. I appriciate it. However question is How to call a method after a delay in Android. So I focued on that. To the point. Otherwise java leaks is a big topic to understand seperately for developers. Jul 24, 2019 at 10:17
  • 1
    Handler().postDelayed({ }, 2000) shows as depricated
    – Tim
    Jun 23, 2021 at 3:32
45

you can use Handler inside UIThread:

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                
    @Override
    public void run() {
        new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
           @Override
           public void run() {
               //add your code here
          }
        }, 1000);           
    }
});
40

Thanks for all the great answers, I found a solution that best suits my needs.

Handler myHandler = new DoSomething();
Message m = new Message();
m.obj = c;//passing a parameter here
myHandler.sendMessageDelayed(m, 1000);

class DoSomething extends Handler {
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
      MyObject o = (MyObject) msg.obj;
      //do something here
    }
}
1
  • Is it okay if I use this approach to have touch feedback on click of an item.. view.setColor(some_color) and then remove this color in Handler after x seconds...?
    – eRaisedToX
    Jun 13, 2017 at 9:30
22

See this demo:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

class Test {
     public static void main( String [] args ) {
          int delay = 5000;// in ms 

          Timer timer = new Timer();

          timer.schedule( new TimerTask(){
             public void run() { 
                 System.out.println("Wait, what..:");
              }
           }, delay);

           System.out.println("Would it run?");
     }
}
21

If you have to use the Handler, but you are into another thread, you can use runonuithread to run the handler in UI thread. This will save you from Exceptions thrown asking to call Looper.Prepare()

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                //Do something after 1 second
            }
        }, 1000);
    }
});

Looks quite messy, but this is one of the way.

2
  • 4
    This works, I can't edit your post because of stupid SO rules with minimum 6 characters to edit, but there is '()' missing after 'new Handler' it should be 'new Handler()' Feb 9, 2015 at 16:17
  • 2
    Instead of placing everything into the UI thread, you can do : new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper())
    – Tobliug
    Mar 18, 2015 at 2:30
19

More Safety - With Kotlin Coroutine

Most of the answers use Handler but I give a different solution to delay in activity, fragment, view model with Android Lifecycle ext. This way will auto cancel when the lifecycle begins destroyed - avoid leaking the memory or crashed app

In Activity or Fragment:

lifecycleScope.launch { 
  delay(DELAY_MS)
  doSomething()
}

In ViewModel:

viewModelScope.lanch {
  delay(DELAY_MS)
  doSomething()
}

In suspend function: (Kotlin Coroutine)

suspend fun doSomethingAfter(){
    delay(DELAY_MS)
    doSomething()
}

If you get an error with the lifecycleScope not found! - import this dependency to the app gradle file:

implementation "androidx.lifecycle:lifecycle-runtime-ktx:2.4.0"
1
  • 2
    I think the coroutine approach is better. Especially when you have the scope bounded with component Activity, Fragment, Custom Component with the lifecycle. Most of the time the requirement is to execute a method while the host is alive. I would also suggest getting the Job instance to support logical cancellation. For example: val job = scope.launch {....} .... .... // Cancel the delay job before it starts execution job.cancel()
    – S.Javed
    Jan 10, 2021 at 22:30
18

I prefer to use View.postDelayed() method, simple code below:

mView.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Do something after 1000 ms
    }
}, 1000);
2
  • 1
    Doesn't it freeze the ui element itself, because it will be scheduled on the views handler? Oct 19, 2015 at 20:12
  • 1
    No, posted task will be executed in 1 second, but during this second UI thread does other useful work
    – demaksee
    Jul 30, 2018 at 9:34
15

Here is my shortest solution:

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Do something after 100ms
    }
}, 100);
13

If you are using Android Studio 3.0 and above you can use lambda expressions. The method callMyMethod() is called after 2 seconds:

new Handler().postDelayed(() -> callMyMethod(), 2000);

In case you need to cancel the delayed runnable use this:

Handler handler = new Handler();
handler.postDelayed(() -> callMyMethod(), 2000);

// When you need to cancel all your posted runnables just use:
handler.removeCallbacksAndMessages(null);
2
  • How can we cancel this? Sep 26, 2017 at 17:04
  • I'm surprised how many here will happily move onto Kotlin, yet completely ignore Lambda Expressions which are standard Java.
    – TomDK
    Aug 16, 2019 at 7:19
10
final Handler handler = new Handler(); 
Timer t = new Timer(); 
t.schedule(new TimerTask() { 
    public void run() { 
        handler.post(new Runnable() { 
            public void run() { 
                //DO SOME ACTIONS HERE , THIS ACTIONS WILL WILL EXECUTE AFTER 5 SECONDS...
            }
        }); 
    } 
}, 5000); 
7

I suggest the Timer, it allows you to schedule a method to be called on a very specific interval. This will not block your UI, and keep your app resonsive while the method is being executed.

The other option, is the wait(); method, this will block the current thread for the specified length of time. This will cause your UI to stop responding if you do this on the UI thread.

2
  • 2
    Thread.sleep() is better than Object.wait(). Wait implies you expect to be notified and are synchronizing around some activity. Sleep indicates that you simply wish to do nothing for some specified time. Timer is the way to go if you want the action to happen asynchronously at some later point in time.
    – Tim Bender
    Jun 18, 2010 at 18:51
  • 1
    That is true. Thats why I listed it as another option ;-)
    – Nate
    Jun 18, 2010 at 19:02
6

So there are a few things to consider here as there are so many ways to skin this cat. Although answers have all already been given selected and chosen. I think it's important that this gets revisited with proper coding guidelines to avoid anyone going the wrong direction just because of "majority selected simple answer".

So first let's discuss the simple Post Delayed answer that is the winner selected answer overall in this thread.

A couple of things to consider. After the post delay, you can encounter memory leaks, dead objects, life cycles that have gone away, and more. So handling it properly is important as well. You can do this in a couple of ways.

For sake of modern development, I'll supply in KOTLIN

Here is a simple example of using the UI thread on a callback and confirming that your activity is still alive and well when you hit your callback.

  Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).postDelayed({
            if(activity != null && activity?.isFinishing == false){
                txtNewInfo.visibility = View.GONE
            }
        }, NEW_INFO_SHOW_TIMEOUT_MS)

However, this is still not perfect as there is no reason to hit your callback if the activity has gone away. so a better way would be to keep a reference to it and remove it's callbacks like this.

    private fun showFacebookStylePlus1NewsFeedOnPushReceived(){
        A35Log.v(TAG, "showFacebookStylePlus1NewsFeedOnPushReceived")
        if(activity != null && activity?.isFinishing == false){
            txtNewInfo.visibility = View.VISIBLE
            mHandler.postDelayed({
                if(activity != null && activity?.isFinishing == false){
                    txtNewInfo.visibility = View.GONE
                }
            }, NEW_INFO_SHOW_TIMEOUT_MS)
        }
    }

and of course handle cleanup on the onPause so it doesn't hit the callback.

    override fun onPause() {
        super.onPause()
        mHandler.removeCallbacks(null)
    }

Now that we have talked through the obvious, let's talk about a cleaner option with modern day coroutines and kotlin :). If you aren't using these yet, you are really missing out.

   fun doActionAfterDelay() 
        launch(UI) {
            delay(MS_TO_DELAY)           
            actionToTake()
        }
    }

or if you want to always do a UI launch on that method you can simply do:

  fun doActionAfterDelay() = launch(UI){ 
      delay(MS_TO_DELAY)           
      actionToTake()
  }

Of course just like the PostDelayed you have to make sure you handle canceling so you can either do the activity checks after the delay call or you can cancel it in the onPause just like the other route.

var mDelayedJob: Job? = null
fun doActionAfterDelay() 
   mDelayedJob = launch(UI) {
            try {
               delay(MS_TO_DELAY)           
               actionToTake()
            }catch(ex: JobCancellationException){
                showFancyToast("Delayed Job canceled", true, FancyToast.ERROR, "Delayed Job canceled: ${ex.message}")
            }
        }
   }
}

//handle cleanup

override fun onPause() {
   super.onPause()
   if(mDelayedJob != null && mDelayedJob!!.isActive) {
      A35Log.v(mClassTag, "canceling delayed job")
      mDelayedJob?.cancel() //this should throw CancelationException in coroutine, you can catch and handle appropriately
   }
}

If you put the launch(UI) into the method signature the job can be assigned in the calling line of code.

so moral of the story is to be safe with your delayed actions, make sure you remove your callbacks, or cancel your jobs and of course confirm you have the right life cycle to touch items on your delay callback complete. The Coroutines also offers cancelable actions.

Also worth noting that you should typically handle the various exceptions that can come with coroutines. For example, a cancelation, an exception, a timeout, whatever you decide to use. Here is a more advanced example if you decide to really start utilizing coroutines.

   mLoadJob = launch(UI){
            try {
                //Applies timeout
                withTimeout(4000) {
                    //Moves to background thread
                    withContext(DefaultDispatcher) {
                        mDeviceModelList.addArrayList(SSDBHelper.getAllDevices())
                    }
                }

                //Continues after async with context above
                showFancyToast("Loading complete", true, FancyToast.SUCCESS)
            }catch(ex: JobCancellationException){
                showFancyToast("Save canceled", true, FancyToast.ERROR, "Save canceled: ${ex.message}")
            }catch (ex: TimeoutCancellationException) {
                showFancyToast("Timed out saving, please try again or press back", true, FancyToast.ERROR, "Timed out saving to database: ${ex.message}")
            }catch(ex: Exception){
                showFancyToast("Error saving to database, please try again or press back", true, FancyToast.ERROR, "Error saving to database: ${ex.message}")
            }
        }
1
  • 1
    No problem Rajiv, I would take it one step further and mention that using Live Data the coroutines can be life cycle aware and self canceling to avoid the cleanup calls, but don't want to throw too many learning curves into one answer ;)
    – Sam
    Nov 8, 2018 at 14:27
6

For a Simple line Handle Post delay, you can do as following :

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Do someting
    }
}, 3000);

I hope this helps

5

You can use this for Simplest Solution:

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Write your code here
    }
}, 5000); //Timer is in ms here.

Else, Below can be another clean useful solution:

new Handler().postDelayed(() -> 
{/*Do something here*/}, 
5000); //time in ms
5

You can make it much cleaner by using the newly introduced lambda expressions:

new Handler().postDelayed(() -> {/*your code here*/}, time);
4

Using Kotlin, we can achieve by doing the following

Handler().postDelayed({
    // do something after 1000ms 
}, 1000)
0
4

If you use RxAndroid then thread and error handling becomes much easier. Following code executes after a delay

Observable.timer(delay, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
        .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
        .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
        .subscribe(aLong -> {
            // Execute code here
        }, Throwable::printStackTrace);
3

I created simpler method to call this.

public static void CallWithDelay(long miliseconds, final Activity activity, final String methodName)
    {
        new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    Method method =  activity.getClass().getMethod(methodName);
                    method.invoke(activity);
                } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }, miliseconds);
    }

To use it, just call : .CallWithDelay(5000, this, "DoSomething");

2
  • 3
    Reflection for such a basic task?
    – Max Ch
    May 13, 2016 at 23:18
  • Since the question to call method similar to iOS performSelector. this is the best way to do.
    – HelmiB
    May 14, 2016 at 4:40
3

Below one works when you get,

java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't create handler inside thread that has not called Looper.prepare()

final Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
  @Override
  public void run() {
    //Do something after 100ms
  }
}, 100);
2

It's very easy using the CountDownTimer. For more details https://developer.android.com/reference/android/os/CountDownTimer.html

import android.os.CountDownTimer;

// calls onTick every second, finishes after 3 seconds
new CountDownTimer(3000, 1000) { 

   public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {
      Log.d("log", millisUntilFinished / 1000);
   }

   public void onFinish() {
      // called after count down is finished
   } 
}.start();
2

I like things cleaner: Here is my implementation, inline code to use inside your method

new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
  @Override
  public void run() {
    //Do something after 100ms
  }
}, 100);
1

everybody seems to forget to clean the Handler before posting a new runnable or message on it. Otherway they could potentially accumulate and cause bad behaviour.

handler.removeMessages(int what);
// Remove any pending posts of messages with code 'what' that are in the message queue.

handler.removeCallbacks(Runnable r)
// Remove any pending posts of Runnable r that are in the message queue.
1

Here is another tricky way: it won't throw exception when the runnable change UI elements.

public class SimpleDelayAnimation extends Animation implements Animation.AnimationListener {

    Runnable callBack;

    public SimpleDelayAnimation(Runnable runnable, int delayTimeMilli) {
        setDuration(delayTimeMilli);
        callBack = runnable;
        setAnimationListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void onAnimationStart(Animation animation) {

    }

    @Override
    public void onAnimationEnd(Animation animation) {
        callBack.run();
    }

    @Override
    public void onAnimationRepeat(Animation animation) {

    }
}

You can call the animation like this:

view.startAnimation(new SimpleDelayAnimation(delayRunnable, 500));

Animation can attach to any view.

1

Here is the answer in Kotlin you lazy, lazy people:

Handler().postDelayed({
//doSomethingHere()
}, 1000)
1
  • Kotlin
  • runOnUiThread from a Fragment
  • Timer

example:

Timer().schedule(500) {
    activity?.runOnUiThread {
        // code                                    
    }
}
0

A suitable solution in android:

private static long SLEEP_TIME = 2 // for 2 second
.
.
MyLauncher launcher = new MyLauncher();
            launcher.start();
.
.
private class MyLauncher extends Thread {
        @Override
        /**
         * Sleep for 2 seconds as you can also change SLEEP_TIME 2 to any. 
         */
        public void run() {
            try {
                // Sleeping
                Thread.sleep(SLEEP_TIME * 1000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e(TAG, e.getMessage());
            }
            //do something you want to do
           //And your code will be executed after 2 second
        }
    }

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