I have a simple C++ CGI Application that receives form data from client. The client is written in C# and uses WWWForm to send and receive data to the C++ CGI Application and everything seems to be working with one exception.

For example, when I send a registration form to the CGI Application, My CGI Application is able to receive the data but when I send an email to the email provided in the form, it makes the client to wait until the email is sent before it disconnects.

I want to process the data, disconnect the client then send the email because sending emails takes time and I want the server response to be fast.

How can I disconnect the client from the CGI Application? Currently right now, the only way the client disconnects is when the CGI Application closes or ends but is there a way to disconnect the client prematurelyso that it doesn't have to wait for the email to finish sending?

I did online research about this but didn't find any single solution to this.

  • 1
    In order for your question to be answerable, I think you will need to provide some of the application code. In particular, I think you should provide any functions that perform output, as well as functions that call them, etc., back to main(). Declarations for classes and functions referenced in those might also be a good idea, although I don't think you need to provide the full definition (except for classes that override the output operator). I would also highly advise that you unbold those bolded words, as they make your question significantly harder to read. – user1837296 Jun 11 '15 at 20:42
  • @Programmer - And what will you do if sending the email fails? You will have no way to tell the user that something went wrong. How to achieve what you want to do ... You would probably need to start another process to send the email. – Hauke S Jun 12 '15 at 16:15
  • @Hauke S, I don't want to notify the user if it fails. I will notify my the server admin then the admin can manually send the email to the user. I am not worried about that for now. The only thing I care about is disconnecting the user before sending the email. I can handle the rest. – Programmer Jun 13 '15 at 12:45
  • @user1837296, The code is thousands of lines long. About 10k lines of code with many many classes. Just pretend what I do is receive information from user using POST/GET then process the data and use cout to send back message to the client that made the request. The data it outputs is from 0 to 10 and that depends on if the registration is successful or not. – Programmer Jun 13 '15 at 13:05
  • @Programmer - I think the answer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6024472/… would help you, too as the problem is basically the same. – Hauke S Jun 13 '15 at 19:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I wrote a very simple c++ cgi using CodeBlocks and MinGW.

All it does is that it creates a detached process and returns directly. It doesn't read any request. That will be left to you.

To get data to the new process you will probably have to write what you want to send into a file and then provide the path to that file to the new process via the commandline that is passed to CreateProcess.

I tested the cgi using Xampp. Please note that you will have to look into the Task Manager in order to check the process has been started as no window will open up.

#include <iostream>
#include "windows.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "Content-type: text/html\n\n";
    cout << "<html><head></head><body>";

    cout << "Hello world! I'm starting a batch job";

    cout << "</body></html>" << endl;

    STARTUPINFO siStartupInfo = {sizeof(STARTUPINFO)};

    siStartupInfo.cb = sizeof(siStartupInfo);
    siStartupInfo.dwFlags = STARTF_USESHOWWINDOW | STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
    siStartupInfo.wShowWindow = SW_HIDE;

    PROCESS_INFORMATION piProcessInfo;

    CreateProcess(NULL, (LPSTR)"\"D:\\Program Files (x86)\\CodeBlocks\\codeblocks.exe\" ",
    0, 0, false, CREATE_DEFAULT_ERROR_MODE | CREATE_NO_WINDOW | DETACHED_PROCESS , 0, 0,
    &siStartupInfo, &piProcessInfo);

    cout << "I created a new process!";

    return 0;
}
  • Hey, thanks for that. Assuming I have a function called sendMail, how can I make it to run in that process? Also, how can I name the process and will the process stop after sending mail...I am little confused... – Programmer Jun 15 '15 at 23:32
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    You can launch any executable program like that. In your case i would build a new executable around the sendMail functionality and pass all needed Parameters to it via a file that needs to be written by your cgi. – Hauke S Jun 16 '15 at 10:58
  • Now, that makes sense. Thanks again. – Programmer Jun 16 '15 at 15:59
  • I discovered this technique works very badly when invoked from scheduled tasks. – Joshua Jul 3 at 4:39

Your CGI application is just a C/C++ program. With that in mind, if you already have the code that sends the email, just run it on another thread.

Depending on what you have configured on your project, you can use pthread or boost::thread.

Example of thread creation using using pthread:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <iostream>

typedef struct{
    // Sample parameters, use your own.
    std::string subject;
    std::string sender;
    std::string recipient;
    std::string message;
} EmailData;

void* do_send_mail(void* void_ptr)
{
    EmailData* data = (EmailData*)void_ptr;

    // your code that sends the email

    delete data;
    return NULL;
}

int main()
{
    // Thread handle
    pthread_t send_mail_thread;

    // Your email struct
    EmailData* email = new EmailData;

    email->subject = "Testing email.";
    email->recipient = "nobody@example.com";
    email->sender = "youremail@example.com";
    email->message = "You just won one billion dollars!";

    if(pthread_create(&send_mail_thread, NULL, do_send_mail, (void*)email)) {

        std::cout << "Failed to create thread that sends the email." << std::endl;
        return 1;

    }

    // Remove this "join" in your CGI application, it waits for the thread to
    // finish (which will make your client wait just like it does now)
    pthread_join(send_mail_thread, NULL);

    return 0;
}

Example of thread creation using using boost::thread:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

typedef struct{
    // Sample parameters, use your own.
    std::string subject;
    std::string sender;
    std::string recipient;
    std::string message;
} EmailData;

void do_send_mail(EmailData& email)
{
    // your code that sends email here
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    EmailData email;
    email.subject = "Testing email.";
    email.recipient = "nobody@example.com";
    email.sender = "youremail@example.com";
    email.message = "You just won one billion dollars!";

    boost::thread email_thread(boost::bind<void>(do_send_mail, email));

    // Remove this "join" in your CGI application, it waits for the thread to
    // finish (which will make your client wait just like it does now)
    email_thread.join();

    return 0;
}

Example of thread creation using using boost::thread (with lambda):

#include <boost/thread.hpp>

typedef struct{
    // Sample parameters, use your own.
    std::string subject;
    std::string sender;
    std::string recipient;
    std::string message;
} EmailData;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    EmailData email;
    email.subject = "Testing email.";
    email.recipient = "nobody@example.com";
    email.sender = "youremail@example.com";
    email.message = "You just won one billion dollars!";

    boost::thread email_thread(boost::bind<void>([](EmailData& email)->void{

        // your code that sends email here

    }, email));

    // Remove this "join" in your CGI application, it waits for the thread to
    // finish (which will make your client wait just like it does now)
    email_thread.join();

    return 0;
}
  • 1
    That will not help as the response to the email request will be send after all threads are done. That is why you need to start a detached process in order to do the work. – Hauke S Jun 16 '15 at 11:00
  • Hauke is right. I did a research before posting this and realized that simple creating a thread will not work. – Programmer Jun 16 '15 at 16:02
  • Sure it works. I use the same approach on my app and it works just as intended. You just have to remove thread join, which will obviously wait for the thread to end (just like I said in the code comments). Using boost::thread you can even use a boost::asio to act as a thread pool and process multiple requests at the same time. It's either that or I'm not understanding the question correctly... – B.R.W. Jun 16 '15 at 17:25
  • Wait, I read the original question again and I think I got it wrong. Are you really using CGI and not FastCGI? No offense, but people still use that? My app is based on FastCGI and it works as I described on the previous comment. – B.R.W. Jun 16 '15 at 17:30
  • 1
    I am using cgi not fast cgi. The tag of my question even made it clear. Also, there is a big difference between cgi and fastcgi and your solution wouldn't work for cgi. The reason I went with cgi is because I wasn't able to compile fastcgi for windows. It has more linux support than windows... – Programmer Jun 17 '15 at 10:19

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