276

I have a problem with the embedded bitcode term.
What is embedded bitcode?
When to enable, ENABLE_BITCODE in new Xcode?
What happens to the binary when enabled, ENABLE_BITCODE in Xcode 7?

329

Bitcode refers to to the type of code: "LLVM Bitcode" that is sent to iTunes Connect. This allows Apple to use certain calculations to re-optimize apps further (e.g: possibly downsize executable sizes). If Apple needs to alter your executable then they can do this without a new build being uploaded.

This differs from: Slicing which is the process of Apple optimizing your app for a user's device based on the device's resolution and architecture. Slicing does not require Bitcode. (Ex: only including @2x images on a 5s)

App Thinning is the combination of slicing, bitcode, and on-demand resources

Bitcode is an intermediate representation of a compiled program. Apps you upload to iTunes Connect that contain bitcode will be compiled and linked on the App Store. Including bitcode will allow Apple to re-optimize your app binary in the future without the need to submit a new version of your app to the store.

Apple Documentation on App Thinning

15
  • Nothing in what you've quoted says that enabling bitcode decreases the size of the app on the user's device. Bitcode has nothing to do with resources like 3x or 2x.
    – user102008
    Jun 12 '15 at 21:24
  • 1
    Again, resources has nothing to do with Bitcode, which is about the code. The downloading by users of only certain architectures of code and certain versions of resources is Slicing, which has nothing to do with Bitcode.
    – user102008
    Jun 13 '15 at 5:09
  • 14
    I disagree that it allows Apple to cut down on your app size. Nowhere does it say that. It says "will allow Apple to re-optimize your app binary in the future without the need to submit a new version of your app to the store" which I take to mean it allows Apple to re-compile your app for a new architecture if a new device with a new architecture comes out, without you needing to submit a new version that includes this architecture.
    – user102008
    Jun 13 '15 at 6:51
  • 2
    No, slicing is separating your apps resources into groups for particular devices. Bitcode is what allows Apple to generate an executable for a particular architecture.
    – Jon Shier
    Jun 14 '15 at 9:21
  • 3
    @JonShier Apple says "Slicing is the process of creating and delivering variants of the app bundle for different target devices. A variant contains only the executable architecture and resources that are needed for the target device" So slicing is only having the executable code AND resources for a certain device.
    – keji
    Jun 14 '15 at 14:18
85

What is embedded bitcode?

According to docs:

Bitcode is an intermediate representation of a compiled program. Apps you upload to iTunes Connect that contain bitcode will be compiled and linked on the App Store. Including bitcode will allow Apple to re-optimize your app binary in the future without the need to submit a new version of your app to the store.

Update: This phrase in "New Features in Xcode 7" made me to think for a long time that Bitcode is needed for Slicing to reduce app size:

When you archive for submission to the App Store, Xcode will compile your app into an intermediate representation. The App Store will then compile the bitcode down into the 64 or 32 bit executables as necessary.

However that's not true, Bitcode and Slicing work independently: Slicing is about reducing app size and generating app bundle variants, and Bitcode is about certain binary optimizations. I've verified this by checking included architectures in executables of non-bitcode apps and founding that they only include necessary ones.

Bitcode allows other App Thinning component called Slicing to generate app bundle variants with particular executables for particular architectures, e.g. iPhone 5S variant will include only arm64 executable, iPad Mini armv7 and so on.

When to enable ENABLE_BITCODE in new Xcode?

For iOS apps, bitcode is the default, but optional. If you provide bitcode, all apps and frameworks in the app bundle need to include bitcode. For watchOS and tvOS apps, bitcode is required.

What happens to the binary when ENABLE_BITCODE is enabled in the new Xcode?

From Xcode 7 reference:

Activating this setting indicates that the target or project should generate bitcode during compilation for platforms and architectures which support it. For Archive builds, bitcode will be generated in the linked binary for submission to the app store. For other builds, the compiler and linker will check whether the code complies with the requirements for bitcode generation, but will not generate actual bitcode.

Here's a couple of links that will help in deeper understanding of Bitcode:

4
  • Will bitcode be included if I have ENABLE_BITCODE but uncheck "Including bitcode" before submit to the App Store?
    – allaire
    Dec 17 '15 at 14:28
  • "For iOS apps, bitcode is the default, but optional." Huh..? Come again..? It is OR Isn't Optional..?
    – user2052717
    Jan 20 '17 at 0:22
  • @NpC0mpl3t3 as stated in the answer it is optional for iOS apps, but required for watchOS and tvOS apps. Jan 26 '17 at 8:05
  • Excellent help! This answer over here shows how to disable bitcode: stackoverflow.com/a/41418824/9190
    – Guerry
    Jun 8 '17 at 14:10
25

Since the exact question is "what does enable bitcode do", I'd like to give a few thin technical details I've figured out thus far. Most of this is practically impossible to figure out with 100% certainty until Apple releases the source code for this compiler

First, Apple's bitcode does not appear to be the same thing as LLVM bytecode. At least, I've not been able to figure out any resemblance between them. It appears to have a proprietary header (always starts with "xar!") and probably some link-time reference magic that prevents data duplications. If you write out a hardcoded string, this string will only be put into the data once, rather than twice as would be expected if it was normal LLVM bytecode.

Second, bitcode is not really shipped in the binary archive as a separate architecture as might be expected. It is not shipped in the same way as say x86 and ARM are put into one binary (FAT archive). Instead, they use a special section in the architecture specific MachO binary named "__LLVM" which is shipped with every architecture supported (ie, duplicated). I assume this is a short coming with their compiler system and may be fixed in the future to avoid the duplication.

C code (compiled with clang -fembed-bitcode hi.c -S -emit-llvm):

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    printf("hi there!");
    return 0;
}

LLVM IR output:

; ModuleID = '/var/folders/rd/sv6v2_f50nzbrn4f64gnd4gh0000gq/T/hi-a8c16c.bc'
target datalayout = "e-m:o-i64:64-f80:128-n8:16:32:64-S128"
target triple = "x86_64-apple-macosx10.10.0"

@.str = private unnamed_addr constant [10 x i8] c"hi there!\00", align 1
@llvm.embedded.module = appending constant [1600 x i8] c"\DE\C0\17\0B\00\00\00\00\14\00\00\00$\06\00\00\07\00\00\01BC\C0\DE!\0C\00\00\86\01\00\00\0B\82 \00\02\00\00\00\12\00\00\00\07\81#\91A\C8\04I\06\1029\92\01\84\0C%\05\08\19\1E\04\8Bb\80\10E\02B\92\0BB\84\102\148\08\18I\0A2D$H\0A\90!#\C4R\80\0C\19!r$\07\C8\08\11b\A8\A0\A8@\C6\F0\01\00\00\00Q\18\00\00\C7\00\00\00\1Bp$\F8\FF\FF\FF\FF\01\90\00\0D\08\03\82\1D\CAa\1E\E6\A1\0D\E0A\1E\CAa\1C\D2a\1E\CA\A1\0D\CC\01\1E\DA!\1C\C8\010\87p`\87y(\07\80p\87wh\03s\90\87ph\87rh\03xx\87tp\07z(\07yh\83r`\87th\07\80\1E\E4\A1\1E\CA\01\18\DC\E1\1D\DA\C0\1C\E4!\1C\DA\A1\1C\DA\00\1E\DE!\1D\DC\81\1E\CAA\1E\DA\A0\1C\D8!\1D\DA\A1\0D\DC\E1\1D\DC\A1\0D\D8\A1\1C\C2\C1\1C\00\C2\1D\DE\A1\0D\D2\C1\1D\CCa\1E\DA\C0\1C\E0\A1\0D\DA!\1C\E8\01\1D\00s\08\07v\98\87r\00\08wx\876p\87pp\87yh\03s\80\876h\87p\A0\07t\00\CC!\1C\D8a\1E\CA\01 \E6\81\1E\C2a\1C\D6\A1\0D\E0A\1E\DE\81\1E\CAa\1C\E8\E1\1D\E4\A1\0D\C4\A1\1E\CC\C1\1C\CAA\1E\DA`\1E\D2A\1F\CA\01\C0\03\80\A0\87p\90\87s(\07zh\83q\80\87z\00\C6\E1\1D\E4\A1\1C\E4\00 \E8!\1C\E4\E1\1C\CA\81\1E\DA\C0\1C\CA!\1C\E8\A1\1E\E4\A1\1C\E6\01X\83y\98\87y(\879`\835\18\07|\88\03;`\835\98\87y(\076X\83y\98\87r\90\036X\83y\98\87r\98\03\80\A8\07w\98\87p0\87rh\03s\80\876h\87p\A0\07t\00\CC!\1C\D8a\1E\CA\01 \EAa\1E\CA\A1\0D\E6\E1\1D\CC\81\1E\DA\C0\1C\D8\E1\1D\C2\81\1E\00s\08\07v\98\87r\006\C8\88\F0\FF\FF\FF\FF\03\C1\0E\E50\0F\F3\D0\06\F0 \0F\E50\0E\E90\0F\E5\D0\06\E6\00\0F\ED\10\0E\E4\00\98C8\B0\C3<\94\03@\B8\C3;\B4\819\C8C8\B4C9\B4\01<\BCC:\B8\03=\94\83<\B4A9\B0C:\B4\03@\0F\F2P\0F\E5\00\0C\EE\F0\0Em`\0E\F2\10\0E\EDP\0Em\00\0F\EF\90\0E\EE@\0F\E5 \0FmP\0E\EC\90\0E\ED\D0\06\EE\F0\0E\EE\D0\06\ECP\0E\E1`\0E\00\E1\0E\EF\D0\06\E9\E0\0E\E60\0Fm`\0E\F0\D0\06\ED\10\0E\F4\80\0E\809\84\03;\CCC9\00\84;\BCC\1B\B8C8\B8\C3<\B4\819\C0C\1B\B4C8\D0\03:\00\E6\10\0E\EC0\0F\E5\00\10\F3@\0F\E10\0E\EB\D0\06\F0 \0F\EF@\0F\E50\0E\F4\F0\0E\F2\D0\06\E2P\0F\E6`\0E\E5 \0Fm0\0F\E9\A0\0F\E5\00\E0\01@\D0C8\C8\C39\94\03=\B4\C18\C0C=\00\E3\F0\0E\F2P\0Er\00\10\F4\10\0E\F2p\0E\E5@\0Fm`\0E\E5\10\0E\F4P\0F\F2P\0E\F3\00\AC\C1<\CC\C3<\94\C3\1C\B0\C1\1A\8C\03>\C4\81\1D\B0\C1\1A\CC\C3<\94\03\1B\AC\C1<\CCC9\C8\01\1B\AC\C1<\CCC9\CC\01@\D4\83;\CCC8\98C9\B4\819\C0C\1B\B4C8\D0\03:\00\E6\10\0E\EC0\0F\E5\00\10\F50\0F\E5\D0\06\F3\F0\0E\E6@\0Fm`\0E\EC\F0\0E\E1@\0F\809\84\03;\CCC9\00\00I\18\00\00\02\00\00\00\13\82`B \00\00\00\89 \00\00\0D\00\00\002\22\08\09 d\85\04\13\22\A4\84\04\13\22\E3\84\A1\90\14\12L\88\8C\0B\84\84L\100s\04H*\00\C5\1C\01\18\94`\88\08\AA0F7\10@3\02\00\134|\C0\03;\F8\05;\A0\836\08\07x\80\07v(\876h\87p\18\87w\98\07|\88\038p\838\80\037\80\83\0DeP\0Em\D0\0Ez\F0\0Em\90\0Ev@\07z`\07t\D0\06\E6\80\07p\A0\07q \07x\D0\06\EE\80\07z\10\07v\A0\07s \07z`\07t\D0\06\B3\10\07r\80\07:\0FDH #EB\80\1D\8C\10\18I\00\00@\00\00\C0\10\A7\00\00 \00\00\00\00\00\00\00\868\08\10\00\02\00\00\00\00\00\00\90\05\02\00\00\08\00\00\002\1E\98\0C\19\11L\90\8C\09&G\C6\04C\9A\22(\01\0AM\D0i\10\1D]\96\97C\00\00\00y\18\00\00\1C\00\00\00\1A\03L\90F\02\134A\18\08&PIC Level\13\84a\D80\04\C2\C05\08\82\83c+\03ab\B2j\02\B1+\93\9BK{s\03\B9q\81q\81\01A\19c\0Bs;k\B9\81\81q\81q\A9\99q\99I\D9\10\14\8D\D8\D8\EC\DA\5C\DA\DE\C8\EA\D8\CA\5C\CC\D8\C2\CE\E6\A6\04C\1566\BB6\974\B227\BA)A\01\00y\18\00\002\00\00\003\08\80\1C\C4\E1\1Cf\14\01=\88C8\84\C3\8CB\80\07yx\07s\98q\0C\E6\00\0F\ED\10\0E\F4\80\0E3\0CB\1E\C2\C1\1D\CE\A1\1Cf0\05=\88C8\84\83\1B\CC\03=\C8C=\8C\03=\CCx\8Ctp\07{\08\07yH\87pp\07zp\03vx\87p \87\19\CC\11\0E\EC\90\0E\E10\0Fn0\0F\E3\F0\0E\F0P\0E3\10\C4\1D\DE!\1C\D8!\1D\C2a\1Ef0\89;\BC\83;\D0C9\B4\03<\BC\83<\84\03;\CC\F0\14v`\07{h\077h\87rh\077\80\87p\90\87p`\07v(\07v\F8\05vx\87w\80\87_\08\87q\18\87r\98\87y\98\81,\EE\F0\0E\EE\E0\0E\F5\C0\0E\EC\00q \00\00\05\00\00\00&`<\11\D2L\85\05\10\0C\804\06@\F8\D2\14\01\00\00a \00\00\0B\00\00\00\13\04A,\10\00\00\00\03\00\00\004#\00dC\19\020\18\83\01\003\11\CA@\0C\83\11\C1\00\00#\06\04\00\1CB\12\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00\00", section "__LLVM,__bitcode"
@llvm.cmdline = appending constant [67 x i8] c"-triple\00x86_64-apple-macosx10.10.0\00-emit-llvm\00-disable-llvm-optzns\00", section "__LLVM,__cmdline"

; Function Attrs: nounwind ssp uwtable
define i32 @main() #0 {
  %1 = alloca i32, align 4
  store i32 0, i32* %1
  %2 = call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([10 x i8]* @.str, i32 0, i32 0))
  ret i32 0
}

declare i32 @printf(i8*, ...) #1

attributes #0 = { nounwind ssp uwtable "less-precise-fpmad"="false" "no-frame-pointer-elim"="true" "no-frame-pointer-elim-non-leaf" "no-infs-fp-math"="false" "no-nans-fp-math"="false" "stack-protector-buffer-size"="8" "target-cpu"="core2" "target-features"="+ssse3,+cx16,+sse,+sse2,+sse3" "unsafe-fp-math"="false" "use-soft-float"="false" }
attributes #1 = { "less-precise-fpmad"="false" "no-frame-pointer-elim"="true" "no-frame-pointer-elim-non-leaf" "no-infs-fp-math"="false" "no-nans-fp-math"="false" "stack-protector-buffer-size"="8" "target-cpu"="core2" "target-features"="+ssse3,+cx16,+sse,+sse2,+sse3" "unsafe-fp-math"="false" "use-soft-float"="false" }

!llvm.module.flags = !{!0}
!llvm.ident = !{!1}

!0 = !{i32 1, !"PIC Level", i32 2}
!1 = !{!"Apple LLVM version 7.0.0 (clang-700.0.53.3)"}

The data array that is in the IR also changes depending on the optimization and other code generation settings of clang. It's completely unknown to me what format or anything that this is in.

EDIT:

Following the hint on Twitter, I decided to revisit this and to confirm it. I followed this blog post and used his bitcode extractor tool to get the Apple Archive binary out of the MachO executable. And after extracting the Apple Archive with the xar utility, I got this (converted to text with llvm-dis of course)

; ModuleID = '1'
target datalayout = "e-m:o-i64:64-f80:128-n8:16:32:64-S128"
target triple = "x86_64-apple-macosx10.10.0"

@.str = private unnamed_addr constant [10 x i8] c"hi there!\00", align 1

; Function Attrs: nounwind ssp uwtable
define i32 @main() #0 {
  %1 = alloca i32, align 4
  store i32 0, i32* %1
  %2 = call i32 (i8*, ...) @printf(i8* getelementptr inbounds ([10 x i8], [10 x i8]* @.str, i32 0, i32 0))
  ret i32 0
}

declare i32 @printf(i8*, ...) #1

attributes #0 = { nounwind ssp uwtable "less-precise-fpmad"="false" "no-frame-pointer-elim"="true" "no-frame-pointer-elim-non-leaf" "no-infs-fp-math"="false" "no-nans-fp-math"="false" "stack-protector-buffer-size"="8" "target-cpu"="core2" "target-features"="+ssse3,+cx16,+sse,+sse2,+sse3" "unsafe-fp-math"="false" "use-soft-float"="false" }
attributes #1 = { "less-precise-fpmad"="false" "no-frame-pointer-elim"="true" "no-frame-pointer-elim-non-leaf" "no-infs-fp-math"="false" "no-nans-fp-math"="false" "stack-protector-buffer-size"="8" "target-cpu"="core2" "target-features"="+ssse3,+cx16,+sse,+sse2,+sse3" "unsafe-fp-math"="false" "use-soft-float"="false" }

!llvm.module.flags = !{!0}
!llvm.ident = !{!1}

!0 = !{i32 1, !"PIC Level", i32 2}
!1 = !{!"Apple LLVM version 7.0.0 (clang-700.1.76)"}

The only notable difference really between the non-bitcode IR and the bitcode IR is that filenames have been stripped to just 1, 2, etc for each architecture.

I also confirmed that the bitcode embedded in a binary is generated after optimizations. If you compile with -O3 and extract out the bitcode, it'll be different than if you compile with -O0.

And just to get extra credit, I also confirmed that Apple does not ship bitcode to devices when you download an iOS 9 app. They include a number of other strange sections that I don't recognized like __LINKEDIT, but they do not include __LLVM.__bundle, and thus do not appear to include bitcode in the final binary that runs on a device. Oddly enough, Apple still ships fat binaries with separate 32/64bit code to iOS 8 devices though.

8
  • Can Apple's bitcode be decompiled? I.e. can Apple now see our source code?
    – malhal
    Jun 25 '15 at 22:00
  • @malcolmhall if it's similar to LLVM code, then only kinda. LLVM bytecode has type information and other hints that can make decompilation much easier and more useful. However, I don't know what's in Apple's bitcode. It probably is at least somewhat more useful, but it's unknown at this point how useful it will be. Either way I highly doubt it'll be as strong of information as say how .NET IL allows almost perfect decompilation to C# code
    – Earlz
    Jun 26 '15 at 19:08
  • Have you seen LLVM's Bitcode File Format? The magic number is different, but Apple is strongly hinting this is the bitcode format. Jul 7 '15 at 0:18
  • "which is shipped with every architecture supported (ie, duplicated)" it's not duplicated, because bitcode is different for each mach-o slice Jul 31 '15 at 10:07
  • 2
    According to twitter.com/mistydemeo/status/644555663373307904, xar! is Apple's archive file format.
    – Riking
    Sep 17 '15 at 18:59
16

Bitcode (iOS, watchOS)

Bitcode is an intermediate representation of a compiled program. Apps you upload to iTunes Connect that contain bitcode will be compiled and linked on the App Store. Including bitcode will allow Apple to re-optimize your app binary in the future without the need to submit a new version of your app to the store.


Basically this concept is somewhat similar to java where byte code is run on different JVM's and in this case the bitcode is placed on iTune store and instead of giving the intermediate code to different platforms(devices) it provides the compiled code which don't need any virtual machine to run.

Thus we need to create the bitcode once and it will be available for existing or coming devices. It's the Apple's headache to compile an make it compatible with each platform they have.

Devs don't have to make changes and submit the app again to support new platforms.

Let's take the example of iPhone 5s when apple introduced x64 chip in it. Although x86 apps were totally compatible with x64 architecture but to fully utilise the x64 platform the developer has to change the architecture or some code. Once s/he's done the app is submitted to the app store for the review.

If this bitcode concept was launched earlier then we the developers doesn't have to make any changes to support the x64 bit architecture.

6
  • @user102008 Slicing is a result of enabling Bitcode
    – keji
    Jun 13 '15 at 5:01
  • @kdogisthebest: No it isn't. Nowhere does it say that. And I've watched the WWDC video on slicing, and it does not every mention enabling Bitcode.
    – user102008
    Jun 13 '15 at 5:02
  • Inder Kumar Rathore when it come to Enterprise App Store How it handle ? do enterprise app store support this feature ?
    – damithH
    Jul 14 '15 at 5:42
  • @damithH There is no enterprise app store, we have to keep apps on our servers. I'm not sure if app thinning will work on enterprise apps or not. But as far as my knowledge it shouldn't be there for enterprise apps Jul 14 '15 at 6:07
  • Please update image in your answer, it's not related to Bitcode.
    – hsafarya
    Sep 10 '15 at 8:53
5

Update

Apple has clarified that slicing occurs independent of enabling bitcode. I've observed this in practice as well where a non-bitcode enabled app will only be downloaded as the architecture appropriate for the target device.

Original

More specifically:

Bitcode. Archive your app for submission to the App Store in an intermediate representation, which is compiled into 64- or 32-bit executables for the target devices when delivered.

Slicing. Artwork incorporated into the Asset Catalog and tagged for a platform allows the App Store to deliver only what is needed for installation.

The way I read this, if you support bitcode, downloaders of your app will only get the compiled architecture needed for their own device.

1
  • In the App Thinning guide (developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/ios/documentation/IDEs/…) "Slicing is the process of creating and delivering variants of the app bundle for different target devices. A variant contains only the executable architecture and resources that are needed for the target device." Downloaders of your app only getting their architecture is part of Slicing.
    – user102008
    Oct 6 '15 at 5:02
1

Bitcode

official page

Bitcode(on-disk bitcode representation, bitcode file format, binary format).

It is one of three representation forms of [Intermediate Representation (IR) in LLVM]. It is bitstream(binary encoding) file format for LLVM IR. It is a result of LLVM IR serialization. It can be optionally embedded into Wrapper or Native Object File(Mach-O inside Raw segment data[About]). It is suitable for Just-In-Time compiler. You are able to convert bitcode IR into human readable IR using llvm-dis

Another advantage which Apple uses is a possibility of recompiling binary for another(new) architecture(instruction set architecture (ISA)) without developer attention. Also as a small additional you have reverse engineering which allows Apple to analize binary easier, but on the other hand it is a disadvantage which can be used by malefactor. Also it increase build time

When you build bitcode .BCSymbolMap[About] also is generated for analizing error stack traces

Please note that bitcode is not generated for simulator(arch x86_64). Xcode uses bitcode in next scenarios:

Flags:

  • -fembed-bitcode - embed bitcode
  • -fembed-bitcode-marker - just mark where it will be located. __LLVM segment is empty, without any data

Using:

  • Enable Bitcode (ENABLE_BITCODE). YES - Is default for App, framework targets

    • uses -fembed-bitcode-marker for regular build
    • uses -fembed-bitcode embeds bitcode in archive(Product -> Archive) or (xcodebuild archive)
  • Add flag explicitly to Other C Flags(OTHER_CFLAGS)

  • User-Defined Setting BITCODE_GENERATION_MODE

    • marker - adds -fembed-bitcode-marker
    • bitcode - adds -fembed-bitcode
  • xcodebuild with appropriate options above

//please make sure that this settings is placed before xcodebuild params(.e.g. -workspace, -scheme...)
xcodebuild ENABLE_BITCODE=YES
//or
xcodebuild BITCODE_GENERATION_MODE="bitcode"
//or
xcodebuild OTHER_CFLAGS="-fembed-bitcode"

If you use embed bitcode in app but not all libraries support it you get

ld: bitcode bundle could not be generated because '<path>' was built without full bitcode. All frameworks and dylibs for bitcode must be generated from Xcode Archive or Install build file '<path>' for architecture <arch>

Check if binary contains bitcode

The bitcode must be stored in a section of the object file named __LLVM,__bitcode for MachO and .llvmbc for the other object formats.

Bitcode injects into __LLVM segment three sections: __bitcode, __cmdline, __asm. Apple's version of LLVM uses a little bit different logic and moves __bitcode and __cmdline into __bundle section as .xar archive.

eXtensible ARchive(XAR) - .xar, .pkg archiver's file format which consists of header, table of contents(toc), heap. TOC is for random access to archived files. Every file in xar is independently compressed

  1. otool -l and find __LLVM __bundle.

You can check segment name and section name in Mach-O file

But it does not guarantee that bitcode is included(e.g. marker)

//<segname> <sectname> e.g. __LLVM __bundle. They are started from __

otool -l "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule"
//or universal framework(specify arch)
otool -arch arm64 -l "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule"
//or all arch
otool -arch all -l "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule"

//-l print the load commands

output:

Section
  sectname __bundle
   segname __LLVM
      addr 0x00000000000c0000
      size 0x00000000003af3ce
    offset 770048
...
  1. otool -v -s __LLVM __bundle
otool -v -s __LLVM __bundle <binary_path>
//e.g.
otool -v -s __LLVM __bundle "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule" 

// -s <segname> <sectname> print contents of section. e.g. -s __LLVM __bundle

// -v print verbosely (symbolically) when possible

output for otool -s __LLVM __bundle. It is bitstream(binary encoding)

Contents of (__LLVM,__bundle) section
00000000000b4000    21726178 01001c00 00000000 c60d0000 
00000000000b4010    00000000 be860000 01000000 9decda78 
00000000000b4020    b6dc735b f3dfc715 5f7a3429 bdc1ce2f 

output for otool -v -s __LLVM __bundle. It is XAR's table of content(TOC). -v Converts bitstream(binary encoding) to XML format of XAR's table of content(TOC)

For (__LLVM,__bundle) section: xar table of contents:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xar>
 <subdoc subdoc_name="Ld">
  <version>1.0</version>
...
  1. One more indicator is generated .bcsymbolmap[About]

Find and extract bitcode

ebcutil

Closed source Library developer - XCFramework
App developer - enable bitcode

Is bitcode mandatory Official

For iOS apps, bitcode is the default, but optional. For watchOS and tvOS apps, bitcode is required.

Binary size

Bitcode increases binary size, when it is not mandatory you can remove bitcode manually from binary using bitcode_strip

For example

xcrun bitcode_strip -r "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule" -o "/Users/alex/MyModule.framework/MyModule"

// -r remove bitcode
// -o output file name

[Vocabulary]

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