71

I'm curious about the best practice for applying JSON-LD onto a site for schema.org.

If I have a page with an Article and I also want to define WebSite on my page, I would have this:

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
    "@context": "http://schema.org",
    "@type": "WebSite",
    "url": "http://www.example.com/",
    "potentialAction": {
      "@type": "SearchAction",
      "target": "http://www.example.com/search?&q={query}",
      "query-input": "required"
    }
}
</script>

<!- … -->

<script type="application/ld+json">
{
  "@context": "http://schema.org",
  "@type": "Article",
  "author": "John Doe",
  "interactionCount": [
    "UserTweets:1203",
    "UserComments:78"
  ],
  "name": "How to Tie a Reef Knot"
}
</script>

Is this correct or wrong? Is there any benefit or need to merge these into the same script or array of items?

52

It’s valid. You can have as many data blocks (= script elements) as you wish.

A possible benefit of using only one script element: it allows to make relationships between multiple items easier (e.g., should you decide to use hasPart or mainEntity), as you simply have to nest the items.
But making these relationships is of course also possible when using separate data blocks, by referencing the URI of the item with @id (thanks, @ Gregg Kellogg).

(For reference, adding two or more top-level items in a single script is possible with @graph.)

  • 8
    You can also tie together the nodes in JSON-LD script block using @id. From a model perspective, they all get treated as triples in a common graph. However, search engines may "optimize" and not so what you expect. Using JSON-LD algorithms there's probably not a good reason to use separate script blocks; just merge them into a common object, or even an array of objects. – Gregg Kellogg Jun 10 '15 at 3:54
  • @GreggKellogg and unor - Thanks for the answers! My main concern was due to the limitations of a CMS, since WebSite is something I would specify at a global level and Article is specified at the page level. I wasn't quite sure what to expect in this scenario. Google's Structured Data Tool gives it an okay but I'm always a little skeptical there :) – Stu Furlong Jun 10 '15 at 5:03
  • @GreggKellogg so it's 2017, is the recommendation now@graph or an array of objects? The relevant discussion was done in 2012 (github.com/json-ld/json-ld.org/issues/96), and the consensus from my reading was @graph for multiple top-level objects. Thanks in advance. – Amir Rustamzadeh Aug 12 '17 at 1:45
  • 1
    @AmirR Typically you'll use @graph (or an alias of @graph) to allow the use of a single top-level object with shared context. Both are quite legitimate, however. Note that another pattern is to use a reverse property with a common object value used as the top-level object, linking to all resources that reference it. See Reverse Properties. – Gregg Kellogg Oct 21 '17 at 21:38
57

There is no benefit in having single or multiple data blocks, other than limitations around how you might store and manage schema data in your website.

For example, you might need them separate if different components within your website are responsible for generating each data block independently. Alternatively, if your website is able to manage all schemas for one page in one place, it may be simpler to manage a single data block and render this as a single script element.

You can combine these into a single script by listing each schema as an array like this:

<script type="application/ld+json">
[
  {
    "@context": "http://schema.org",
    "@type": "WebSite",
    "url": "http://www.example.com/",
    "potentialAction": {
      "@type": "SearchAction",
      "target": "http://www.example.com/search?&q={query}",
      "query-input": "required"
    }
  },
  {
    "@context": "http://schema.org",
    "@type": "Article",
    "author": "John Doe",
    "interactionCount": [
      "UserTweets:1203",
      "UserComments:78"
    ],
    "name": "How to Tie a Reef Knot"
  }
]
</script>

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