2

Write a function:

function solution(A); 

that, given a non-empty zero-indexed array A of N integers, returns the minimal positive integer (greater than 0) that does not occur in A. For example, given:

A[0] = 1   
A[1] = 3   
A[2] = 6   
A[3] = 4   
A[4] = 1   
A[5] = 2

the function should return 5. Assume that:

• N is an integer within the range [1..100,000]; • each element of array A is an integer within the range

[−2,147,483,648..2,147,483,647].

Complexity: • expected worst-case time complexity is O(N); • expected worst-case space complexity is O(N), beyond input storage (not counting the storage required for input arguments).

My Answer is 100% WRONG! What is wrong with it? First let me state the obvious errors

  • return value - i return 0, because there is no indication of what to return, if there is no missing integer.

Assumptions I made that may be wrong

  • returns the minimal positive integer (greater than 0) that does not occur in A. Here I do not check for negative values

my code, which works on own test cases, and works on negative numbers too, got 0%.

function solution(A) {

    // write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 0.12)
    A.sort();
    var a_length = A.length;

    for(var i = 0; i < a_length; i++){

        // if i is 0 - 1 = -1 then do not do the following
        // if i is 1 - 1 - 0 then do the follow
        // if i >= 0 then do the following
        if(i - 1 >= 0){

            // remember above there is a A.sort() so it 
            // looks like this
            // A[0] = 1
            // A[1] = 1
            // A[2] = 2
            // A[3] = 3
            // A[4] = 4
            // A[5] = 6

            // if A[1] is 1 and A[1-1 = 0] is 1 then this is 1>1 false 
            // if A[2] is 2 and A[2-1 = 1] is 1 then this is 1>1 false  
            // if A[3] is 3 and A[3-1 = 2] is 2 then this is 1>1 false  
            // if A[4] is 4 and A[4-1 = 3] is 3 then this is 1>1 false  
            // if A[5] is 6 and A[5-1 = 4] is 4 then this is 2>1 true return A[i - 1] + 1 where A[5 - 1 = 4] is 4 + 1 is 5. 5 is returned.
            if(A[i] - A[i - 1] > 1){
                return A[i - 1] + 1;
            }
        }
    }

    // this does not check for negative
    // returns the minimal positive integer (greater than 0
    // this is a return no minimal positive integer found
    return 0;
}

Everything is wrong, example test result:

simple simple test 0.072 s WRONG ANSWER got 3 expected 1

Why does it work for me and not for them.

  • just why don't you simply change the algorithm, find the smallest number and keep on adding one to it, say that to be variable "number" then check if that "number" is present in the given set of array and if not, then that would be your solution and of course the complexity is high but it would get you a new direction to think and ya keep a not of highest number in the array, so that when the "number" is equal to highest number you can return zero when it is required – Sumit Jun 9 '15 at 7:00

16 Answers 16

14
function solution(A) {
        var min = 1;
        A.sort(function(a,b){
           // Sort the array explicit way
           return a - b; 
        });

        for (var i in A) {
            if (A[i] > -1 && A[i] == min) {
                    min++;
            }
        }

        return min;
}
  • Nice and clean answer. Easy to understand. – Hoon Jun 10 at 16:11
6

There is my solution with JavaScript for Codility MissingInteger (got 100/100)

function solution(A) {
    const len = A.length;
    const hash = {};
    for (let i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        hash[A[i]] = A[i];
    }
    for (let i = 1; i < 1000002; i++) {
        if(!hash[i]) return i;
    }
    return 1;
}
  • Generally, answers are much more helpful if they include an explanation of what the code is intended to do, and why that solves the problem without introducing others. Thanks for improving the answer's reference value and making it more understandable! – Tim Diekmann Jun 18 '18 at 10:42
3

function solution(A) {
        A.sort(function(a,b){
           // Sort the array explicit way
           return a - b; 
        });
        return A.reduce((prev, next)=> {
            if(next > -1 && next === prev) {
                prev++;
            }
            return prev;
        }, 1);
     ;
}

2
function solution(A) {
// write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 6.4.0)
var b = A.sort(function(a,b){return a-b});
var length = b.length;
var min = b[0];
var max = b[length-1];
if (max<=0){return 1;}
if (min<=0 && max==1){return 2;}
if (min>1){return 1;}
if (min >=0){
    for(var i=0; i<length; i++){
       if(b[i+1]- b[i] > 1){
           return b[i]+1;
       }
    }
}
if (min<=0 && max>=0){
    for(var i=0; i<length; i++){
        if(b[i]>0 && b[i-1]<=0){
            if(b[i]-0>1){
               return 1; 
            }
            if(b[i+1]-b[i]>1){
                return b[i]+1;
            }
        }
        if(b[i]>0){
            if(b[i+1]- b[i] > 1){
               return b[i]+1;
            }
        }
    }
}
return max+1;

}

  • 1
    Please explain how this answers the question instead of just pasting code. – kinggs Sep 13 '17 at 9:48
0

Try something like this:

// Array containing your numbers
var Arr = [1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2];
solution(Arr);

function solution(Arr) {
    var len = Arr.length;
    var min = 100001;
    var num;

    // check if it is empty
    if (len == 0) {
        alert('Empty zero-indexed array given');
    }

    // find array's min number
    for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (Arr[i] < min) {
            min = Arr[i];
        }
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
        var x = Arr.indexOf(min);
        if (x == -1) {
            num = min;
            break;
        }
        min++;
    }

    alert('Min value in array is: ' + num);
}

Here is a working Jsfiddle demo.

  • Example test: [-1, -3] WRONG ANSWER (got -2 expected 1) – Kamlesh Jun 17 '18 at 8:48
  • @Kamlesh my solution does not account for negative numbers. You can add an additional check like: if num < 0 always return 1, if you need to handle those as well. – Sotiris Kiritsis Jun 17 '18 at 9:12
0

I think your solution was not correct because you used sorting. Sorting is a O(n*log(n)) operation, and they asked for a solution that has both time and space complexity of O(n).

0

My solution:

function solution(A) {
// write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 6.4.0)
var B = A.sort(function(a,b){return a-b});
if(A.length == 1) {
    if(A[0] > 0) {
        if(A[0]>1) {
            return 1
        } else {
            return A[0]+ 1;    
        }
    } else {
        return 1   
    }
} else if(A.length > 1) {
    let max = Math.max.apply(null,A);
    let min = Math.min.apply(null,A);
    if(max > 0) {
        if(B[0]-0 > 1) { //for arrays that have a minimum higher than 1
            return 1
        }
        for(i=0;i<B.length-1;i++) { 
            if(B[i+1]- B[i] > 1){ //check the difference between next and current number, we also ignore the case of [x,-1,1,x2], since if a 0 is omitted, 1-(-1) will make 0 the highest missing number
                if(B[i] == -1 && B[i+1] == 1) {
                    //do nothing
                } else {
                    if(B[i]>0) {
                        return B[i]+1; //if the first number is positive, we can say the number after it is the smallest possible integer
                    } else {
                        return 1
                    }
                }   
            } 
        }
        return max + 1;
    } else {
        return 1
    }

} else {
    return null;
}
}
0

I got 100% by this solution

function solution(A) {
    let  sortedOb={};
    let biggest=0;
    A.forEach(el=>{
        if(el>0)
        {
             sortedOb[el]=0;
              biggest =  el>biggest? el:biggest
        }
    });
    let arr = Object.keys(sortedOb).map(el=>+el);
    if(arr.length==0)
    return 1;
    for(let i = 1; i<=biggest; i ++){
        if(sortedOb[i] === undefined)
        return i
    }
    return biggest+1
}
0

you can try this: I used C#

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    int[] tempArray = new int[1000000];
    int[] givenArray = new int[] { 1, 2,3};   // or     { 1, 2,6,4,3}

    int results = myFunction(tempArray, givenArray);
    Console.WriteLine(results);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

private static int myFunction(int[] tempArray, int[] givenArray)
{
    int res = 0;

    for (int x = 1; x < tempArray.Length; x++)
    {

        if (!givenArray.Contains(x))
        {
            tempArray[x] = x;
        }
    }

    for (int y = 0; y < tempArray.Length; y++)
    {
        if (tempArray[y] > 0)
        {
            res = tempArray[y];
            break;
        }
    }
    return res;
}
0

one more way to do it ::

  1. Sort the array and get lowest digit of array.

  2. Increment the lowest digit and check if it already exists.

  3. Return the lowest positive interger.

Got it !!

//var A =[1,3,4,10];
var i =0;
var solution = function(A) {
var min = 0;
var max = 0;
sortedArray = A.sort(function(a, b){return a-b});
min =sortedArray[0]; //min value
max =sortedArray[sortedArray.length-1];//max value in array

if(min < 0){
alert("min is 1"); //use return 1
}
else if(min > 0){
for(;i<sortedArray.length;i++){
x = checkifNoExists(min+i+1);//start checking the no. with min  
if(x){
    var lowest = min+i+1
    break;
}
}
alert(lowest);//use return lowest
}
}
checkifNoExists = function(no){//to check if no exists in array
for(var y = 0;y<sortedArray.length;y++){
if(sortedArray[y] == no){
var found = no
}
}
if(found == "" || found == undefined){
return true;
}else{
return false;
}   
}       
0

I tried to implement the JavaScript solution similar to the one I used in Java and came to realize that JavaScripts native Array.sort() was lacking performance...

I used a RadixSort implementation from @Blindman67 to sort the array and a simple loop and scored 100/100 @ O(N) or O(N * log(N)).

function solution(A) {
    A = radixSort(A);
    let min = 1;
    for (let i = 0; i <= A.length; ++i) {
      if (A[i] == min && min <= A.length) {
        min++;
      }
    }
    return min;
}

// RadixSort by: https://codereview.stackexchange.com/users/120556/blindman67
function radixSort(numbers) {
  function emptyBuckets() {          // empties buckets and adds contents back to workArray
    workArray.length = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i += 1) {   // could have used buckets forEach but this is quicker on average
      if (buckets[i].length > 0) {
        workArray.push(...buckets[i]);
        buckets[i].length = 0;
      }
    }
  }

  var i;                  // hoist declarations
  const results = [];     // array that holds the finnal sorted numbers
  const buckets = [[], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], [], []];  // buckets
  const workArray = [...numbers]; // copy the numbers
  var power = 0;                  // current digit as a power of ten
  var tenPow = 1;                 // ten to the power of power
  if (numbers.length <= 1) {        // if one or no items then dont sort
    return workArray;           // dont sort if there is no need.
  }
  // as numbers are sorted and moved to the result array the numbers
  while (workArray.length > 0) {
    for (i = 0; i < workArray.length; i += 1) { // for all numbers still being sorted
      if (workArray[i] < tenPow) {            // is the number samller than the current digit
        results.push(workArray[i]);         //Yes it is sorted then remove a put o nthe result array
      } else {
        // add to bucket. Use Math.floor and save complexity doing it in one statement line
        buckets[Math.floor(workArray[i] / tenPow) % 10].push(workArray[i]);
      }
    }
    power += 1;
    tenPow = Math.pow(10, power);
    emptyBuckets();
  }
  return results;
}
0

My swift 3 solution (100/100)

public func solution(_ A : inout [Int]) -> Int {
  let set = Set(A)
  var value = 1
  while true {
    if !set.contains(value) {
      return value
    }
    value += 1
  }
}
  • what do you get then @Pierre.Vriens? I mean your correctness and performance – user3664114 Nov 5 '18 at 11:25
0

For this problem I like to start by sorting the given array. I then iterate through the sorted array with a reduce. I give the reduce an accumulator acc initially equal to 1 (that's what the 1 after the comma is for). Only when the element val is equal to the accumulator do I increment the accumulator. Otherwise, I return the accumulator as is. When I can no longer find an element in the array equal to the accumulator, that accumulator is the lowest missing positive integer.

const solution = A => {
    A.sort((a, b) => a - b);
    return A.reduce((acc, val) => acc === val ? acc + 1 : acc, 1);
}

I know this question's been around for a while but I hope this answer is useful for someone. I use Array.prototype.sort(), Array.prototype.reduce(), and a ternary in this answer. A knowledge of those patterns should give more insight into this answer.

0

This was my solution that scored 66% on Task Score, 100% on Correctness and only 25% on Performance. Not the most performant solution but a working one none the less.

  1. First checks to make sure the highest number in the array is over 0, if not we end there with a result of 1
  2. Loop through numbers from 1 to highest number in array
  3. If that number does not have an index in the array, that is our result
  4. If all numbers from 1 to the highest in the array are present, the next highest number is the result
const test1 = [1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2]; // Returns 5
const test2 = [1, 2, 3]; // Returns 4
const test3 = [-1, -3]; // Returns 1

function solution(A) {
  const lowestNum = Math.min.apply(Math, A);
  const highestNum = Math.max.apply(Math, A);

  // Check highestNum to make sure it's over 0
  if (highestNum > 0) {
    // Loop through all the numbers from 1 to the highes in the array
    for (var i = 1; i < highestNum; i++) {
      // If i does not have an index in the array, that's our solution
      if (Number(A.indexOf(i)) === -1) {
        return i;
      }
    }
    // If looped through array and all have an index, the next number is our answer
    return i + 1;
  } else {
  // If highestNum is not over 0, answer is 1
    return 1;
  }
}

solution(test1);

JS Fiddle demo

0

Using Javascript, I did this in kind of an odd way but I got 100% on task score, correctness, and performance. However, I got an O(N) or O(N*log(N)). So, I'd like to lower that down.

function solution(A){
    // remove all negative and zero 
    let positiveArray = A.filter(x => x > 0);
    // sort all positive values
    let sortedArray = positiveArray.sort((x,y) => x-y);
    // return first that doesn't appear in order
    return sortedArray.reduce((prev, next) => {
        if(next === prev){
            prev++
        }
        return prev;
    },1);
}
0

My JS solution got 100 across the board. Basically, I generate a new array whose keys will be the values of the original array and set each to some truthy value. This does two things: it takes the negative values out of the iteration loop of the new array, and also allows you to loop from the smallest value up and return the first index that gives you undefined.

function solution(A) {
    orderedArr = [];
    for (let i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        if (!orderedArr[A[i]]) {
            orderedArr[A[i]] = true;
         }
    }
    if (orderedArr.length === 0) return 1;
    for (let i = 1; i < orderedArr.length; i++) {
        if (!orderedArr[i]) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return orderedArr.length;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.