69

Currently i am starting RabbitMQ Docker container using the default RabbitMQ image from DockerHub. Using the following commands.

docker run --restart=always \
-d \
-e RABBITMQ_NODENAME=rabbitmq \
-v /opt/docker/rabbitmq/data:/var/lib/rabbitmq/mnesia/rabbitmq \
-p 5672:5672 \
-p 15672:15672 \
--name rabbitmq rabbitmq:3-management

I have a need where i want to provide defaults users / and virtual-hosts when the image is first started. For example to create a default 'test-user'.

Currently i have to do that manually by using the management plugin and adding the users / virtual-hosts via the web ui. Is there a way i can provide default settings when starting the RabbitMQ image?

0

11 Answers 11

69

You can create a simple Dockerfile that extends the functionality of the basic image and creates a default user. The Docker file you need is the following:

FROM rabbitmq

# Define environment variables.
ENV RABBITMQ_USER user
ENV RABBITMQ_PASSWORD user
ENV RABBITMQ_PID_FILE /var/lib/rabbitmq/mnesia/rabbitmq

ADD init.sh /init.sh
RUN chmod +x /init.sh
EXPOSE 15672

# Define default command
CMD ["/init.sh"]

And the init.sh:

#!/bin/sh

# Create Rabbitmq user
( rabbitmqctl wait --timeout 60 $RABBITMQ_PID_FILE ; \
rabbitmqctl add_user $RABBITMQ_USER $RABBITMQ_PASSWORD 2>/dev/null ; \
rabbitmqctl set_user_tags $RABBITMQ_USER administrator ; \
rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p / $RABBITMQ_USER  ".*" ".*" ".*" ; \
echo "*** User '$RABBITMQ_USER' with password '$RABBITMQ_PASSWORD' completed. ***" ; \
echo "*** Log in the WebUI at port 15672 (example: http:/localhost:15672) ***") &

# $@ is used to pass arguments to the rabbitmq-server command.
# For example if you use it like this: docker run -d rabbitmq arg1 arg2,
# it will be as you run in the container rabbitmq-server arg1 arg2
rabbitmq-server $@

This script also initialize and expose the RabbitMQ webadmin at port 15672.

21
  • 1
    cd /tmp ; \ wget http://localhost:15672/cli/rabbitmqadmin ; \ mv ./rabbitmqadmin /rabbitmqadmin ; \ chmod +x /rabbitmqadmin ; \ I think these lines can be removed, as the admin command is already available inside the container. – Joris Mans Mar 28 '16 at 15:18
  • 1
    @JanuszSkonieczny Maybe something wrong with your line endings? I just tried the instructions again and it worked. – Marco Oct 30 '16 at 9:13
  • 2
    I get this error: /usr/local/bin/docker-entrypoint.sh: line 296: /init.sh: Permission denied. Did I miss something? – cdimitroulas Feb 6 '17 at 15:00
  • 6
    Does this actually work? On 3.6.6 I can't add any users without first having the node/application running. It looks like you are adding them before running rabbitmq-server. – Derek May 17 '17 at 4:28
  • 4
    About the sleep 5, If you want a more reliable way to wait for rabbitmq to be initalized, I would suggest to use this instead : rabbitmqctl wait /var/lib/rabbitmq/mnesia/rabbitmq.pid. I'm using a docker-compose running a lot of containers and it worked for me. – user3793803 Feb 22 '19 at 16:18
75

Came up with a solution that suits my needs, leaving it here in case anybody else needs it.

Summary

The idea is to take a standard rabbitmq container with management plugin enabled and use it to create the required configuration, then export and use it to start new containers. The below solution creates a derived docker image but it also works to just mount the two files at runtime (e.g. using docker compose).

References

Components

  • official rabbitmq image, management plugin version (rabbitmq:management)
  • custom image based on the original one, with this Dockerfile (using version 3.6.6):

    FROM rabbitmq:3.6.6-management
    ADD rabbitmq.config /etc/rabbitmq/
    ADD definitions.json /etc/rabbitmq/
    RUN chown rabbitmq:rabbitmq /etc/rabbitmq/rabbitmq.config /etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json
    CMD ["rabbitmq-server"]
    
  • rabbitmq.config just tells rabbitmq to load definitions from the json file
  • definitions.json contains the users, vhosts, etc. and can be generated by the export function of the management web interface

rabbitmq.config example:

[
  {rabbit, [
    {loopback_users, []}
  ]},
  {rabbitmq_management, [
    {load_definitions, "/etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json"}
  ]}
].

definitions.json example:

{
 "rabbit_version": "3.6.6",
 "users": [
  {
   "name": "user1",
   "password_hash": "pass1",
   "hashing_algorithm": "rabbit_password_hashing_sha256",
   "tags": ""
  },
  {
   "name": "adminuser",
   "password_hash": "adminpass",
   "hashing_algorithm": "rabbit_password_hashing_sha256",
   "tags": "administrator"
  }
 ],
 "vhosts": [
  {
   "name": "\/vhost1"
  },
  {
   "name": "\/vhost2"
  }
 ],
 "permissions": [
  {
   "user": "user1",
   "vhost": "\/vhost1",
   "configure": ".*",
   "write": ".*",
   "read": ".*"
  }
 ],
 "parameters": [],
 "policies": [],
 "queues": [],
 "exchanges": [],
 "bindings": []
}

Alternave version

Deriving a new docker image is just one solution and works best when portability is key, since it avoids including host-based file management in the picture.

In some situations using the official image and providing configuration files from storage local to the host might be preferred.

The rabbitmq.config and definitions.json files are produced the same way, then mounted at runtime.

Notes:

  • I'm assuming they have been placed in /etc/so/ for the sake of these examples
  • files need to either be world readable or owned by the rabbitmq user or group (numerical id inside the docker container is 999), this needs to be handled by the host's sysadmin

docker run example:

    docker run --rm -it \
        -v /etc/so/rabbitmq.config:/etc/rabbitmq/rabbitmq.config:ro \
        -v /etc/so/definitions.json:/etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json:ro \
        rabbitmq:3.6-management

docker compose example:

    version: '2.1'
    services:
        rabbitmq:
            image: "rabbitmq:3.6-management"
            ports:
                - 5672:5672
                - 15672:15672
            volumes:
                - /etc/so/rabbitmq.config:/etc/rabbitmq/rabbitmq.config:ro
                - /etc/so/definitions.json:/etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json:ro
6
  • 2
    This is a great solution. @Tom.P adds a little to this with the definitions export from Rabbit. Combine the two and that should be the accepted answer. This worked for me! – Kent Bull Oct 3 '17 at 14:15
  • 2
    @KentJohnson the fact that "definitions.json [...] can be generated by the export function of the management web interface" is already one of my points, that's how I did it too (the provided examples are just to get an idea right away) – sudo Oct 4 '17 at 13:27
  • 2
    Added chown command to make sure permissions are ok (thanks @Tom P.) and added an alternate solution that uses the official image + configuration files mounted at runtime – sudo Nov 29 '17 at 9:16
  • 1
    I've found this password hashing script which was pretty useful for me also gist.github.com/lukebakken/7b4da46ed9abb7ed14f7a60b49f9e52e – jmhostalet Sep 12 '18 at 7:03
  • 1
    Great solution. The main problem is to find documentation for the definitions.json. But you can do manually all the configuration and then export the definiton medium.com/@thomasdecaux/… – Kleyson Rios Nov 22 '18 at 15:11
20

The newest version of the RabbitMQ image on Dockerhub has in-built functionality for changing the default username / password from "guest" / "guest" to something else.

Simply set the environment variables "RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_USER" and "RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_PASS" when starting the image.

As a docker command, you would run the image like this:

docker run \
-e RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_USER=test-user \
-e RABBITMQ_DEFAULT_PASS=test-user \
-p 5672:5672 \
rabbitmq
1
  • Unfortunately it doesn't seem possible to combine this with a definitions file :( – Cocowalla Dec 3 '19 at 21:40
11

I would like to add that sudo's response helped me a lot. But that it still missed a command to be added to the Dockerfile.

The rabbitmq.config and definitions.json file should be owned by the rabbitmq user & group. So after adding the files run chown.

The full Dockerfile in my case was the following:

FROM rabbitmq:3-management-alpine
ADD definitions.json /etc/rabbitmq/
ADD rabbitmq.config /etc/rabbitmq/
RUN chown rabbitmq:rabbitmq /etc/rabbitmq/rabbitmq.config /etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json

EXPOSE 4369 5671 5672 15671 15672 25672

CMD ["rabbitmq-server"]

The rabbitmq.config file has the following content being a merge from the default image's config and the added definitions loading:

[
    { rabbit, [
        {loopback_users, []},
        { tcp_listeners, [ 5672 ]},
        { ssl_listeners, [ ]},
        { hipe_compile, false } 
    ]},
    { rabbitmq_management, [
        { load_definitions, "/etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json"},
        { listeners, [
            { port, 15672 },
            { ssl, false } 

        ]}
    ]}
].

The definitions file can be exported from the management interface in the overview tab.

So you would first create a normal 'empty' rabbitmq container. Define whatever users, exchanges and queues you like. Then enter the management interface, export the definitions and create your own image using the file as described above.

Downloading the definitions is the easiest way to get the right password hashes in the definitions file for your own passwords. If you do not wish to do that you should follow the instructions as noted here (https://www.rabbitmq.com/passwords.html) to generate the correct hashes.

5
  • I think you have enough content to make this an answer. So rather delete all the sentences that prevent this from being an answer (like saying: should be a comment). And that comment-needs-50 rule exists for good reasons. – GhostCat Aug 15 '17 at 14:18
  • 1
    Sorry those reputation roles are a sore point. There's been many times I felt like wanting to contribute something in a comment, an upvote and for everything I would get the 'this requires x reputation' message. Makes it a really high boundary to start contributing. In any case, thanks for the comment, I've made those changes. :) – Tom P. Aug 16 '17 at 8:33
  • The problem is that a very high number of people get accounts here. Too many of them give zip nada niente about quality. It only takes 1,2 well received questions to get to "upvote", and 1,2 well received answers and you are up to "comment". – GhostCat Aug 16 '17 at 8:35
  • 3
    @TomP. That was great recommending the export from Rabbit. That really saved me time! And it is completely accurate. This should be combined with sudo's answer as the accepted answer. – Kent Bull Oct 3 '17 at 13:55
  • 1
    I've found this password hashing script which was pretty useful for me also gist.github.com/lukebakken/7b4da46ed9abb7ed14f7a60b49f9e52e – jmhostalet Sep 12 '18 at 7:03
3

In my case sleep 5 solution above did not work because RabbitMQ startup time was much longer and not predictable. Posting solution which waits until RabbitMQ is up and running:

  • Dockerfile

    FROM rabbitmq:3-management
    ADD init.sh /
    ADD config_rabbit.sh /
    RUN chmod +x /init.sh /config_rabbit.sh
    ENTRYPOINT ["/init.sh"]
    
  • init.sh

    #!/bin/bash
    
    # Launch config script in background
    # Note there is no RabbitMQ Docker image support for executing commands after server (PID 1) is running (something like "ADD schema.sql /docker-entrypoint-initdb.d" in MySql image), so we are using this trick
    /config_rabbit.sh &
    
    # Launch
    /docker-entrypoint.sh rabbitmq-server
    
  • config_rabbit.sh

    #!/bin/bash
    
    # This script needs to be executed just once
    if [ -f /$0.completed ] ; then
      echo "$0 `date` /$0.completed found, skipping run"
      exit 0
    fi
    
    # Wait for RabbitMQ startup
    for (( ; ; )) ; do
      sleep 5
      rabbitmqctl -q node_health_check > /dev/null 2>&1
      if [ $? -eq 0 ] ; then
        echo "$0 `date` rabbitmq is now running"
        break
      else
        echo "$0 `date` waiting for rabbitmq startup"
      fi
    done
    
    # Execute RabbitMQ config commands here
    
    # Create user
    rabbitmqctl add_user USER PASSWORD
    rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p / USER ".*" ".*" ".*"
    echo "$0 `date` user USER created"
    
    # Create queue
    rabbitmqadmin declare queue name=QUEUE durable=true
    echo "$0 `date` queues created"
    
    # Create mark so script is not ran again
    touch /$0.completed
    
2

With RabbitMQ 3.7, and the newer rabbitmq.conf (sysctl) configuration format, the following sets up RabbitMQ with a default user and queue in Docker, you can optionally add the following RUN commands in the dockerfile to create users...

RUN rabbitmqctl add_user {username} {password}
RUN rabbitmqctl set_user_tags {username} administrator
RUN rabbitmqctl set_permissions ...

rabbitmq.conf

# Default user
default_user = testuser
default_pass = testpassword

## The default "guest" user is only permitted to access the server
## via a loopback interface (e.g. localhost).
loopback_users.guest = true

# IPv4
listeners.tcp.default = 5672

## HTTP listener and embedded Web server settings.
management.tcp.port = 15672

# Load queue definitions
management.load_definitions = /etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json

#Ignore SSL
ssl_options.verify               = verify_peer
ssl_options.fail_if_no_peer_cert = true

definitions.json

{
  "rabbit_version": "3.7.11",
  "users": [
    {
      "name": "testuser",
      "password_hash": "txn+nsYVkAaIMvDsH8Fsyb3RWMCMWihRUVCk/wICL1NBKKvz",
      "hashing_algorithm": "rabbit_password_hashing_sha256",
      "tags": "administrator"
    }
  ],
  "vhosts": [ { "name": "test-vhost" } ],
  "permissions": [
    {
      "user": "testuser",
      "vhost": "test-vhost",
      "configure": ".*",
      "write": ".*",
      "read": ".*"
    }
  ],
  "topic_permissions": [],
  "parameters": [],
  "global_parameters": [
    {
      "name": "cluster_name",
      "value": "rabbit@test-rabbit"
    }
  ],
  "policies": [],
  "queues": [
    {
      "name": "testqueue",
      "vhost": "test-vhost",
      "durable": true,
      "auto_delete": false,
      "arguments": {}
    }
  ],
  "exchanges": [],
  "bindings": []
}

Dockerfile

FROM rabbitmq:3.7-management

COPY rabbitmq.conf /etc/rabbitmq
COPY definitions.json /etc/rabbitmq

RUN ls /etc/rabbitmq
RUN cat /etc/rabbitmq/rabbitmq.conf

Dockers commands to build and run the container...

docker build -t rabbitmq-with-queue .
docker run --rm -it --hostname my-rabbit -p 5672:5672 -p 15672:15672 rabbitmq-with-queue
2

In Kubernetes, similar to @sudo's answer; it is possible to load the definitions.json file into the container via a ConfigMap & Volume.

The ConfigMap rabbitmq-definitions-configmap is defined as a configmap created from a file, with the target being the definitions.json.

You can do the same thing for the rabbitmq.config file also.

Please take note of the usage of mountPath & subPath, just using mountPath did not work for me.

apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: rabbitmq-deployment
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: rabbitmq-deployment
  replicas: 1
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: rabbitmq-deployment
    spec:
      volumes:
      - name: rabbitmq-definitions
        configMap:
          name: rabbitmq-definitions-configmap
      containers:
      - name: rabbitmq
        image: rabbitmq:3.7.18-management-alpine
        imagePullPolicy: IfNotPresent
        envFrom:
        - configMapRef:
            name: rabbitmq-configmap
        - secretRef:
            name: rabbitmq-secrets
        volumeMounts:
        - name: rabbitmq-definitions
          mountPath: /etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json
          subPath: rabbitmq-definitions
1
  • Perfect advice, thanks. I used this idea together with the kubernetes docs on configmap (didn't know about this feature) for increasing the heartbeat of my rabbitmq server by saving a file under /etc/rabbitmq/conf.d/. But I didn't need to use subPath. Thank you so much for your contribution – Vinicius Dantas Sep 17 '20 at 20:57
2

The above mentioned solutions have one caveat: they will "disable" the docker-entrypoint.sh script present in the official rabbit docker images. This may or may not be a problem for you. This script creates the initial RabbitMQ configuration file; adds some good default values (e.g. total memory limit if the container is running with a memory limit).

If you want to keep full compatibility and you don't want to "disable" this script you can use the following approach. It'll add an additional admin user with admin password and also keep guest user untouched. This can be useful for development.

This approach is using a definitions.json file to initialize the users using the management plugin. To inform the plugin about the definitions.json file we use the RABBITMQ_SERVER_ADDITIONAL_ERL_ARGS environment variable (not the rabbitmq.conf file).

Create definitions.json file:

{
  "users": [
    {
      "name": "guest",
      "password_hash": "R184F4Fs6JLdo8tFqRjWnkJL2DlAZJupxEqkO/8kfV/G63+z",
      "hashing_algorithm": "rabbit_password_hashing_sha256",
      "tags": "administrator"
    },
    {
      "name": "admin",
      "password_hash": "FGA5ZeTOLHnIp4ZjxIj0PsShW/DpLgdYAlHsbli7KMMa8Z0O",
      "hashing_algorithm": "rabbit_password_hashing_sha256",
      "tags": "administrator"
    }
  ],
  "vhosts": [
    {
      "name": "/"
    }
  ],
  "permissions": [
    {
      "user": "guest",
      "vhost": "/",
      "configure": ".*",
      "write": ".*",
      "read": ".*"
    },
    {
      "user": "admin",
      "vhost": "/",
      "configure": ".*",
      "write": ".*",
      "read": ".*"
    }
  ],
  "parameters": [],
  "policies": [],
  "queues": [],
  "exchanges": [],
  "bindings": []
}

Create custom Dockerfile:

FROM rabbitmq:3.8.3-management

ADD --chown=rabbitmq ./definitions.json /etc/rabbitmq/

ENV RABBITMQ_SERVER_ADDITIONAL_ERL_ARGS="-rabbitmq_management load_definitions \"/etc/rabbitmq/definitions.json\""

Use the following command to build the image: docker build --tag myrabbit:1.0.0 .

Then run it: docker run -d -p 5672:5672 -p 15672:15672 --restart unless-stopped --name rabbitmq myrabbit:1.0.0

1
  • Thanks. This worked for me, the env variable was the key – xbmono Aug 24 '20 at 4:06
0

Here is an example of how I add an unprivileged user gg RUN useradd -d /home/gg -m -s /bin/bash gg RUN echo gg:gg | chpasswd RUN echo 'gg ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD:ALL' >> /etc/sudoers.d/gg RUN chmod 0440 /etc/sudoers.d/gg

0

I had to make a few changes to the script in the accepted answer to get it working based on the comments above.

Dockerfile

FROM rabbitmq

# Define environment variables.
ENV RABBITMQ_USER user
ENV RABBITMQ_PASSWORD user

ADD init.sh /init.sh
EXPOSE 15672

# Define default command
CMD ["/init.sh"]

init.sh

#!/bin/sh
( sleep 10 && \
rabbitmqctl add_user $RABBITMQ_USER $RABBITMQ_PASSWORD && \
rabbitmqctl set_user_tags $RABBITMQ_USER administrator && \
rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p / $RABBITMQ_USER  ".*" ".*" ".*" ) & \
rabbitmq-server
-3

You can create a new image and use the rabbitmqctl command line.

For example using this Dockerfile:

FROM rabbitmq
# rabbitmqctl command requires to start the rabbitmq server 
RUN service rabbitmq-server start
RUN /usr/lib/rabbitmq/bin/rabbitmqctl add_user test-user mypassword
RUN /usr/lib/rabbitmq/bin/rabbitmqctl add_vhost myvhost 
RUN /usr/lib/rabbitmq/bin/rabbitmqctl set_permissions -p /myvhost test-user ".*" ".*" ".*"

And build the image using

sudo docker build -t anImageName .

I have not test my answer, I cannot use docker at work

1
  • 2
    It wont work, the build process is stateless, no daemons will be running on that process – markcial Apr 27 '16 at 11:13

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