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I'm making a Choose Your Own Text Adventure game which, so far, contains far too much nesting. Example code is below = mine's in the same format, just with far more nesting - sometimes approaching 10 layers deep.

My question is: Any way to flatten it? The strings mean I need every IF statement to print something every time it's valid, so I can't just use 'AND' like this:

if A and B:
    do something
elif C and D:
    do something else

I've thought of putting the parts that repeat in their own functions, but then that won't improve readability in this case - at least, not that I can figure out.

Help?

print "First String"
choice = raw_input("Choose A or B")
if choice == "A":
    print "You Chose A"
    choice = raw_input("Choose C or D")
    if choice == "C":
        print "You Chose C"
        choice = raw_input("Choose E or F")
        if choice == "E" or choice == "F":
            print "END"
    elif choice == "D":
        print "You Chose D"
        choice = raw_input("Choose G or H")
        if choice == "G" or choice == "H":
            print "END"
elif choice == "B":
    print "You Chose B"
    choice = raw_input("Choose I or J")
    if choice == "I":
        print "You Chose I"
        choice = raw_input("Choose C or D")
        if choice == "C":
            print "You Chose C"
            choice = raw_input("Choose E or F")
            if choice == "E" or choice == "F":
                print "END"
        elif choice == "D":
            print "You Chose D"
            choice = raw_input("Choose G or H")
            if choice == "G":
                print "END"
            elif choice == "H":
                print "You Chose H"
                choice = raw_input("Choose K or L")
                if choice == "K" or choice == "L":
                    print "END"
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  • No. Please use functions. Imperative programming is just that; unmaintainable and unwieldy. Jun 10 '15 at 6:39
  • 2
    use a dictionary for the mapping: e.g. acceptable_choices = {'A': ('C', 'D'), ...}
    – Pynchia
    Jun 10 '15 at 6:39
  • Recommend you to consider game states (print in you example) as a nodes of graph and possible inputs (chooses) as an edges. So you will describe game logic in graph structure and use one function to jump from state to state.
    – mr0re1
    Jun 10 '15 at 6:39
  • You said in your OP "The strings mean I need every IF statement to print something every time it's valid" So when the user inputs A,B,C or D and get the next prompt with the next two strings to input, then what happens exactly? Do you just need to print new strings when the user inputs A,B,C or D? Jun 10 '15 at 11:52
3

If the mappings are straightforward, like , lets say , if I chose A first, i can chose C or D , also if I chose B first I can chose C or E. Now when in C , irrespective of whether the first choice was A or B, the choices you get are same. Then you can use recursion along with a dictionary like -

dict = {'-1':['A','B'], 'A' : ['C','D'] , 'B':['I','J'], 'C':['E','F'] ..}

Then a recursive function like -

def choose(previousChoice, num):
    print str(num) + " String"
    choice = raw_input("Choose " + ' or '.join(dict[previousChoice]) + " :")
    if dict.get(choice) != None and len(dict.get(choice)) > 0:
        choose(choice, num + 1)

In the above example you start with -

choose('-1',1)
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  • Thanks for your help, Anand S Kumar. I'm confused by the 2nd line of the recursive function, and when I try it out it gives me a syntax error at 'or.join' - are you sure it's correct? What's it supposed to do? Jun 11 '15 at 11:16
  • Fixed - its ' or '.join(dict[previousChoice]) It is used to join the lists with or in between, like ' or '.join(['A','B']) would output 'A or B' Jun 11 '15 at 12:02

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