12

Which clause performs first in a SELECT statement?

I have a doubt in select query on this basis.

consider the below example

SELECT * 
FROM #temp A 
INNER JOIN #temp B ON A.id = B.id 
INNER JOIN #temp C ON B.id = C.id 
WHERE A.Name = 'Acb' AND B.Name = C.Name
  1. Whether, First it checks WHERE clause and then performs INNER JOIN

  2. First JOIN and then checks condition?

If it first performs JOIN and then WHERE condition; how can it perform more where conditions for different JOINs?

16

The conceptual order of query processing is:

1. FROM
2. WHERE
3. GROUP BY
4. HAVING
5. SELECT
6. ORDER BY

But this is just a conceptual order. In fact the engine may decide to rearrange clauses. Here is proof. Lets make 2 tables with 1000000 rows each:

CREATE TABLE test1 (id INT IDENTITY(1, 1), name VARCHAR(10))
CREATE TABLE test2 (id INT IDENTITY(1, 1), name VARCHAR(10))


;WITH cte AS(SELECT -1 + ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) d FROM
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t1(n) CROSS JOIN
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t2(n) CROSS JOIN
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t3(n) CROSS JOIN
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t4(n) CROSS JOIN
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t5(n) CROSS JOIN
(VALUES(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1),(1)) t6(n))

INSERT INTO test1(name) SELECT 'a' FROM cte

Now run 2 queries:

SELECT * FROM dbo.test1 t1
JOIN dbo.test2 t2 ON t2.id = t1.id AND t2.id = 100
WHERE t1.id > 1


SELECT * FROM dbo.test1 t1
JOIN dbo.test2 t2 ON t2.id = t1.id
WHERE t1.id = 1

Notice first will filter most rows out in join condition, second in where condition. Look at produced plans:

1 TableScan - Predicate:[Test].[dbo].[test2].[id] as [t2].[id]=(100)

2 TableScan - Predicate:[Test].[dbo].[test2].[id] as [t2].[id]=(1)

Which means that in first query optimized decided first to evaluate join condition to filter out rows, in second it evaluated where clause first.

8

Logical order of query processing phases is:

  1. FROM - Including JOINs
  2. WHERE
  3. GROUP BY
  4. HAVING
  5. SELECT
  6. ORDER BY

You can have as many as conditions even on your JOINs or WHERE clauses. Like:

Select * from #temp A 
INNER JOIN #temp B ON A.id = B.id AND .... AND ... 
INNER JOIN #temp C ON B.id = C.id AND .... AND ...
Where A.Name = 'Acb'
AND B.Name = C.Name
AND ....
3

You can refer MSDN

The rows selected by a query are filtered first by the FROM clause join conditions, then the WHERE clause search conditions, and then the HAVING clause search conditions. Inner joins can be specified in either the FROM or WHERE clause without affecting the final result.

You can also use the SET SHOWPLAN_ALL ON before executing your query to show the execution plan of your query so that you can measure the performance difference in the two.

  • I had a 1:20 minute query with join, with LIMIT 0,10 , solved only removing join , maybe for INNER could be better and for LEFT not? – giuseppe Apr 3 '18 at 8:42
1

you can refer to this join optimization

SELECT * FROM T1 INNER JOIN T2 ON P1(T1,T2)
                 INNER JOIN T3 ON P2(T2,T3)
  WHERE P(T1,T2,T3)

The nested-loop join algorithm would execute this query in the following manner:

FOR each row t1 in T1 {
  FOR each row t2 in T2 such that P1(t1,t2) {
    FOR each row t3 in T3 such that P2(t2,t3) {
      IF P(t1,t2,t3) {
         t:=t1||t2||t3; OUTPUT t;
      }
    }
  }
}
0

If you come to this site for the question about logical query processing, you really need to read this article on ITProToday by Itzik Ben-Gan.

Figure 3: Logical query processing order of query clauses

1 FROM 
2 WHERE 
3 GROUP BY 
4 HAVING 
5 SELECT
    5.1 SELECT list
    5.2 DISTINCT
6 ORDER BY 
7 TOP / OFFSET-FETCH

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