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What is the difference between SET ANSI NULLS ON and SET ANSI NULLS OFF?

I understand that the operators = and <> in where statement for comparing with nulls does not return any value when SET ANSI NULLS ON is mentioned. As a best practice which statement I should use in procedures? and why?

Regards, Philip

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  • Just in case you have missed it, ansi nulls affects also variables containing nulls in addition to just "NULL". – James Z Jun 10 '15 at 14:37
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Best practice is set ANSI_NULLS always ON according to Microsoft.

MSDN says

In a future version of SQL Server, ANSI_NULLS will always be ON and any applications that explicitly set the option to OFF will generate an error. Avoid using this feature in new development work, and plan to modify applications that currently use this feature.

So I would start practicing my query with ANSI NULL ON from now on.

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SET ANSI NULLS ON Specifies ISO compliant behavior of the Equals (=) and Not Equal To (<>) comparison operators when they are used with null values

Key Point: As Set ANSI NULLS mainly Deals with ATOMICITY of the database you should SET ANSI_NULLS ON

Read "ATOMIC WITH" block in this link

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  • ANSI NULLs does not "mainly deal with ATOMICITY". It mainly deals with the rules for comparison. I don't understand your reference to ATOMIC WITH, a new feature in SQL Server 2014. The documentation merely says that for a procedural block defined with these keywords, then ANSI NULLs is always on. And, although it would be interesting to know why the functionality is required for the block, it doesn't seem relevant to the question. – Gordon Linoff Jun 10 '15 at 13:54
  • As "Atomic with" deals with Atomicity.We should use ANSI_NULLS ON.I meentioned Atomic With here because,the question is about =="As a best practice which statement I should use in procedures? and why?".And i looked in that prespective and gave the answer.@gordon Linoff – Hell Boy Jun 11 '15 at 5:06
  • Let me phrase this differently. Transactions deal with atomicity, and they have no such requirement. – Gordon Linoff Jun 11 '15 at 11:17
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As the documentation states:

In a future version of SQL Server, ANSI_NULLS will always be ON and any applications that explicitly set the option to OFF will generate an error. Avoid using this feature in new development work, and plan to modify applications that currently use this feature.

ON is the default, and is compatible with other databases. Don't bother turning it off, unless you have a really, really good reason.

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