44

Question

How do we use a bearer token with ASP.NET 5 using a username and password flow? For our scenario, we want to let a user register and login using AJAX calls without needing to use an external login.

To do this, we need to have an authorization server endpoint. In the previous versions of ASP.NET we would do the following and then login at the ourdomain.com/Token URL.

// Configure the application for OAuth based flow
PublicClientId = "self";
OAuthOptions = new OAuthAuthorizationServerOptions
{
    TokenEndpointPath = new PathString("/Token"),
    Provider = new ApplicationOAuthProvider(PublicClientId),
    AccessTokenExpireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromDays(14)
};

In the current version of ASP.NET, though, the above doesn't work. We've been trying to figure out the new approach. aspnet/identity example on GitHub, for instance, configures Facebook, Google, and Twitter authentication but does not appear to configure a non-external OAuth authorization server endpoint, unless that's what AddDefaultTokenProviders() does, in which case we're wondering what the URL to the provider would be.

Research

We've learned from reading the source here that we can add "bearer authentication middleware" to the HTTP pipeline by calling IAppBuilder.UseOAuthBearerAuthentication in our Startup class. This is a good start though we're still not sure of how to set its token endpoint. This didn't work:

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{  
    app.UseOAuthBearerAuthentication(options =>
    {
        options.MetadataAddress = "meta";
    });

    // if this isn't here, we just get a 404
    app.Run(async context =>
    {
        await context.Response.WriteAsync("Hello World.");
    });
}

On going to ourdomain.com/meta we just receive our hello world page.

Further research showed that we can also use the IAppBuilder.UseOAuthAuthentication extension method, and that it takes a OAuthAuthenticationOptions parameter. That parameter has a TokenEndpoint property. So though we're not sure what we're doing, we tried this, which of course didn't work.

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    app.UseOAuthAuthentication("What is this?", options =>
    {
        options.TokenEndpoint = "/token";
        options.AuthorizationEndpoint = "/oauth";
        options.ClientId = "What is this?";
        options.ClientSecret = "What is this?";
        options.SignInScheme = "What is this?";
        options.AutomaticAuthentication = true;
    });

    // if this isn't here, we just get a 404
    app.Run(async context =>
    {
        await context.Response.WriteAsync("Hello World.");
    });
}

In other words, in going to ourdomain.com/token, there is no error there is just again our hello world page.

1
  • Need same functionality in .Net Core 2.0, can it be achieved? Sep 20, 2017 at 12:09

2 Answers 2

52

EDIT (01/28/2021): AspNet.Security.OpenIdConnect.Server has been merged into OpenIddict as part of the 3.0 update. To get started with OpenIddict, visit documentation.openiddict.com.


Okay, let's recap the different OAuth2 middleware (and their respective IAppBuilder extensions) that were offered by OWIN/Katana 3 and the ones that will be ported to ASP.NET Core:

  • app.UseOAuthBearerAuthentication/OAuthBearerAuthenticationMiddleware: its name was not terribly obvious, but it was (and still is, as it has been ported to ASP.NET Core) responsible for validating access tokens issued by the OAuth2 server middleware. It's basically the token counterpart of the cookies middleware and is used to protect your APIs. In ASP.NET Core, it has been enriched with optional OpenID Connect features (it is now able to automatically retrieve the signing certificate from the OpenID Connect server that issued the tokens).

Note: starting with ASP.NET Core beta8, it is now namedapp.UseJwtBearerAuthentication/JwtBearerAuthenticationMiddleware.

  • app.UseOAuthAuthorizationServer/OAuthAuthorizationServerMiddleware: as the name suggests, OAuthAuthorizationServerMiddleware was an OAuth2 authorization server middleware and was used to create and issue access tokens. This middleware won't be ported to ASP.NET Core: OAuth Authorization Service in ASP.NET Core.

  • app.UseOAuthBearerTokens: this extension didn't really correspond to a middleware and was simply a wrapper around app.UseOAuthAuthorizationServer and app.UseOAuthBearerAuthentication. It was part of the ASP.NET Identity package and was just a convenient way to configure both the OAuth2 authorization server and the OAuth2 bearer middleware used to validate access tokens in a single call. It won't be ported to ASP.NET Core.

ASP.NET Core will offer a whole new middleware (and I'm proud to say I designed it):

  • app.UseOAuthAuthentication/OAuthAuthenticationMiddleware: this new middleware is a generic OAuth2 interactive client that behaves exactly like app.UseFacebookAuthentication or app.UseGoogleAuthentication but that supports virtually any standard OAuth2 provider, including yours. Google, Facebook and Microsoft providers have all been updated to inherit from this new base middleware.

So, the middleware you're actually looking for is the OAuth2 authorization server middleware, aka OAuthAuthorizationServerMiddleware.

Though it is considered as an essential component by a large part of the community, it won't be ported to ASP.NET Core.

Luckily, there's already a direct replacement: AspNet.Security.OpenIdConnect.Server (https://github.com/aspnet-contrib/AspNet.Security.OpenIdConnect.Server)

This middleware is an advanced fork of the OAuth2 authorization server middleware that comes with Katana 3 but that targets OpenID Connect (which is itself based on OAuth2). It uses the same low-level approach that offers a fine-grained control (via various notifications) and allows you to use your own framework (Nancy, ASP.NET Core MVC) to serve your authorization pages like you could with the OAuth2 server middleware. Configuring it is easy:

ASP.NET Core 1.x:

// Add a new middleware validating access tokens issued by the server.
app.UseOAuthValidation();

// Add a new middleware issuing tokens.
app.UseOpenIdConnectServer(options =>
{
    options.TokenEndpointPath = "/connect/token";

    // Create your own `OpenIdConnectServerProvider` and override
    // ValidateTokenRequest/HandleTokenRequest to support the resource
    // owner password flow exactly like you did with the OAuth2 middleware.
    options.Provider = new AuthorizationProvider();
});

ASP.NET Core 2.x:

// Add a new middleware validating access tokens issued by the server.
services.AddAuthentication()
    .AddOAuthValidation()

    // Add a new middleware issuing tokens.
    .AddOpenIdConnectServer(options =>
    {
        options.TokenEndpointPath = "/connect/token";

        // Create your own `OpenIdConnectServerProvider` and override
        // ValidateTokenRequest/HandleTokenRequest to support the resource
        // owner password flow exactly like you did with the OAuth2 middleware.
        options.Provider = new AuthorizationProvider();
    });

There's an OWIN/Katana 3 version, and an ASP.NET Core version that supports both .NET Desktop and .NET Core.

Don't hesitate to give the Postman sample a try to understand how it works. I'd recommend reading the associated blog post, that explains how you can implement the resource owner password flow.

Feel free to ping me if you still need help. Good luck!

13
  • 1
    From reading what you wrote and relating it to this terrific post by Sakimura, it appears that ASP.NET 5 lets us be both the relying party and the identity provider or to rely on an external, third-party identity provider. Is that right? Jun 12, 2015 at 17:19
  • 1
    OTB, yep, except that you can't natively add an identity provider to your app anymore (the OAuth2 authorization server has not been ported). In other words, you can be a "relying party" (or a "client application" to be exact) and protect the "resource server" with JWT tokens (your API), but you can't be the "identity provider". The project I mentioned allows you to add this last role to your app, so that you can be your own identity provider. Jun 12, 2015 at 18:04
  • 1
    The OAuth 2.0 specification uses the term "Authentication Server." Is that term synonymous with the term Identity Provider that the OpenID Connect documentation uses? Jun 12, 2015 at 19:51
  • 1
    Actually, the OAuth2 specifications only use the term "authorization server" and not "authentication server" (purist will tell you that's because OAuth2 is an authorization protocol). But of course, in OpenID Connect, an identity provider is an authorization/authentication server, so yeah, these concepts are definitely synonyms. Jun 12, 2015 at 21:04
  • 1
    Yup, but I'd recommend directly using the OpenIdConnectServerProvider.GrantResourceOwnerCredentials notification for that: use ASP.NET Identity to create a principal from the username/password couple and call notification.Validated(principal);. You can call notification.Rejected() to reject the token request if the username of the password is incorrect. Jun 13, 2015 at 6:50
33

With @Pinpoint's help, we've wired together the rudiments of an answer. It shows how the components wire together without being a complete solution.

Fiddler Demo

With our rudimentary project setup, we were able to make the following request and response in Fiddler.

Request

POST http://localhost:50000/connect/token HTTP/1.1
User-Agent: Fiddler
Host: localhost:50000
Content-Length: 61
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

grant_type=password&username=my_username&password=my_password

Response

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Cache-Control: no-cache
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Length: 1687
Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8
Expires: -1
X-Powered-By: ASP.NET
Date: Tue, 16 Jun 2015 01:24:42 GMT

{
  "access_token" : "eyJ0eXAiOi ... 5UVACg",
  "expires_in" : 3600,
  "token_type" : "bearer"
}

The response provides a bearer token that we can use to gain access to the secure part of the app.

Project Structure

This is the structure of our project in Visual Studio. We had to set its Properties > Debug > Port to 50000 so that it acts as the identity server that we configured. Here are the relevant files:

ResourceOwnerPasswordFlow
    Providers
        AuthorizationProvider.cs
    project.json
    Startup.cs

Startup.cs

For readability, I've split the Startup class into two partials.

Startup.ConfigureServices

For the very basics, we only need AddAuthentication().

public partial class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddAuthentication();
    }
}

Startup.Configure

public partial class Startup
{
    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
    {
        JwtSecurityTokenHandler.DefaultInboundClaimTypeMap.Clear();
        JwtSecurityTokenHandler.DefaultOutboundClaimTypeMap.Clear();

        // Add a new middleware validating access tokens issued by the server.
        app.UseJwtBearerAuthentication(new JwtBearerOptions
        {
            AutomaticAuthenticate = true,
            AutomaticChallenge = true,
            Audience = "resource_server_1",
            Authority = "http://localhost:50000/",
            RequireHttpsMetadata = false
        });

        // Add a new middleware issuing tokens.
        app.UseOpenIdConnectServer(options =>
        {
            // Disable the HTTPS requirement.
            options.AllowInsecureHttp = true;

            // Enable the token endpoint.
            options.TokenEndpointPath = "/connect/token";

            options.Provider = new AuthorizationProvider();

            // Force the OpenID Connect server middleware to use JWT
            // instead of the default opaque/encrypted format.
            options.AccessTokenHandler = new JwtSecurityTokenHandler
            {
                InboundClaimTypeMap = new Dictionary<string, string>(),
                OutboundClaimTypeMap = new Dictionary<string, string>()
            };

            // Register an ephemeral signing key, used to protect the JWT tokens.
            // On production, you'd likely prefer using a signing certificate.
            options.SigningCredentials.AddEphemeralKey();
        });

        app.UseMvc();

        app.Run(async context =>
        {
            await context.Response.WriteAsync("Hello World!");
        });
    }
}

AuthorizationProvider.cs

public sealed class AuthorizationProvider : OpenIdConnectServerProvider
{
    public override Task ValidateTokenRequest(ValidateTokenRequestContext context)
    {
        // Reject the token requests that don't use
        // grant_type=password or grant_type=refresh_token.
        if (!context.Request.IsPasswordGrantType() &&
            !context.Request.IsRefreshTokenGrantType())
        {
            context.Reject(
                error: OpenIdConnectConstants.Errors.UnsupportedGrantType,
                description: "Only grant_type=password and refresh_token " +
                             "requests are accepted by this server.");

            return Task.FromResult(0);
        }

        // Since there's only one application and since it's a public client
        // (i.e a client that cannot keep its credentials private), call Skip()
        // to inform the server that the request should be accepted without 
        // enforcing client authentication.
        context.Skip();

        return Task.FromResult(0);
    }

    public override Task HandleTokenRequest(HandleTokenRequestContext context)
    {
        // Only handle grant_type=password token requests and let the
        // OpenID Connect server middleware handle the other grant types.
        if (context.Request.IsPasswordGrantType())
        {
            // Validate the credentials here (e.g using ASP.NET Core Identity).
            // You can call Reject() with an error code/description to reject
            // the request and return a message to the caller.

            var identity = new ClaimsIdentity(context.Options.AuthenticationScheme);
            identity.AddClaim(OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Subject, "[unique identifier]");

            // By default, claims are not serialized in the access and identity tokens.
            // Use the overload taking a "destinations" parameter to make sure 
            // your claims are correctly serialized in the appropriate tokens.
            identity.AddClaim("urn:customclaim", "value",
                OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.AccessToken,
                OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.IdentityToken);

            var ticket = new AuthenticationTicket(
                new ClaimsPrincipal(identity),
                new AuthenticationProperties(),
                context.Options.AuthenticationScheme);

            // Call SetResources with the list of resource servers
            // the access token should be issued for.
            ticket.SetResources("resource_server_1");

            // Call SetScopes with the list of scopes you want to grant
            // (specify offline_access to issue a refresh token).
            ticket.SetScopes("profile", "offline_access");

            context.Validate(ticket);
        }

        return Task.FromResult(0);
    }
}

project.json

{
  "dependencies": {
    "AspNet.Security.OpenIdConnect.Server": "1.0.0",
    "Microsoft.AspNetCore.Authentication.JwtBearer": "1.0.0",
    "Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc": "1.0.0",
  }

  // other code omitted
}
18
  • 1
    It looks pretty nice. One remark though: referencing MVC 6 and its services shouldn't be necessary. Have you tried calling services.AddAuthentication(); from ConfigureServices? It internally invokes services.AddWebEncoders(), which registers IUrlEncoder. Also, await Task.Delay(1); should be replaced by return Task.FromResult<object>(null); to avoid an unnecessary thread switch. Jun 16, 2015 at 10:38
  • 1
    If you use the last package, you'll also need to add caching services in ConfigureServices: services.AddCaching() (currently part of the Microsoft.Framework.Caching.Memory package) Jun 24, 2015 at 0:18
  • 1
    For those who don't see the overload for AddClaim that takes the destination(I don't for whatever reason), you can call .WithDestination() on each claim.
    – Evan
    Dec 22, 2015 at 17:18
  • 1
    @ShaunLuttin in "Without our rudimentary [...]" did you actually mean With ?
    – superjos
    Apr 29, 2016 at 14:15
  • 1
    BTW for present requirements, a more fit provider name would probably be AuthenticationProvider
    – superjos
    May 2, 2016 at 16:24

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