17

Just realized a few days ago that Docker seems to bypass my iptable rules. I am not incredible experienced with Docker nor iptables. Tried a lot of different things the last days. Also saw that there was big change in recent docker versions with a special DOCKER-chain that should allow me to do that. However not sure what I am doing wrong but it never does what I expect it to do.

So what I want is quite simple. I want that it behaves like expected. That if I have an ACCEPT-Rule to go through and if not it gets blocked.

My iptable looked originally like that (so before my many unsuccessful attempts):

*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [779:162776]
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m conntrack --ctstate RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 1.2.3.4 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 123 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -j DROP
COMMIT

Hoped that it does exactly what I want. Just allow access to ports 22 and 80 and also allow port 123 from the ip 1.2.3.4. However If I create a container with "-p 123:123" everybody can access it. Can anybody help me and tell me how I have to change the above file?

Thanks!

Docker-Version: 1.6.2

Edit:

Left initially my different tries out to not overcomplicate the question. However adding at least one of them could maybe be helpful.

*nat
:PREROUTING ACCEPT [319:17164]
:INPUT ACCEPT [8:436]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:POSTROUTING ACCEPT [16:960]
:DOCKER - [0:0]
COMMIT


*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [779:162776]
:DOCKER - [0:0]
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m conntrack --ctstate RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
-A DOCKER -s 1.2.3.4 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 123 -j ACCEPT
-A DOCKER -j DROP
-A INPUT -j DROP
COMMIT

The above kind of works. However get then a lot of other problems. For example do I get problems with container linking, DNS does not work anymore, and so on. So then end up adding a lot of additional rules to fix that issues but I get never to a state where it runs properly. So I guess there most be better and easier solution out there.

Solution:

Ended up doing more or less exactly what larsks said. Just did not add it to the FORWARD chain, I added it to the DOCKER chain instead. The problem with the FORWARD chain is that Docker adds its stuff in there when it restarts in first position. Which results in having my rules getting pushed down and not having any effect. However for the DOCKER chain it seems Docker appends only additional rules so mine stay in effect. So when I save my rules and then restart the server everything still works fine.

So now it looks more or less like that:

*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [779:162776]
:DOCKER - [0:0]
# That I can access from IP 1.2.3.4
-A DOCKER -s 1.2.3.4/32 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 123 -j ACCEPT
# That I can access from other Docker containers
-A DOCKER -o docker0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 123 -j ACCEPT
# Does not allow it for anything else
-A DOCKER -p tcp --dport 123 -j DROP

-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -m conntrack --ctstate RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -j DROP
COMMIT

5 Answers 5

10

I'm not an expert on iptables but I know that if you run the container with -p 127.0.0.1:123:123 then the port won't be exposed on all interfaces, just on the loopback.

1
  • 3
    But would it not mean that I could only access it from localhost unless I setup some kind reverse proxy? So I still want ports to be accessible to the outside world. But only if I say so specifically. My current solution is not 100% what I was looking for because it is open by default and I have to close manually but is close enough.
    – janober
    Jun 12, 2015 at 20:12
5

Your iptables configuration looks a little broken right now, as if you cleared it out at some point without restarting Docker. For example, you have a DOCKER chain available in both the filter and nat tables, but no rules that reference it, so rules placed in that chain will have no affect.

In general, if you want to implement iptables rules that affect your Docker containers they need to go in the FORWARD chain of the filter table. Each container has it's own ip address, which means that your host is simply accepting packets and then FORWARDing them to the container address.

Rules in the INPUT chain are only for packets with a final destination of an address on an interface in the host's global network namespace.

However, I'm not sure that iptables is actually your problem.

If you are trying to expose services in containers such that they are available to other systems, you need to publish those ports using the -p flag to docker run. You can read more about that in this section of the documentation.

If you want to update your question with a specific example of what you are trying to accomplish I can provide a more targeted answer.

Update

It's true that when you publish a container port using -p it will generally be available to any source ip address. In order to restrict access to a published port you would need to add a new rule to your FORWARD chain. For example, if I start a web server:

docker run --name web -p 80:8080 larsks/mini-httpd

The web server in the container is now available on port 8080 on my host. If I want to block access to this port, I need to insert a rule into the FORWARD chain that blocks access to port 80 on the container ip. So first I need the container ip address:

$ web_ip=$(docker inspect --format '{{ .NetworkSettings.IPAddress }}' web)
$ echo $web_ip
172.17.0.5

The rule I create in the FORWARD chain needs to come before the rules that docker creates, so I will need to specify an explicit position:

iptables -I FORWARD 1 -d $web_ip -p tcp --dport 80 \! -s 192.168.1.10 -j DROP

This would block all traffic from hosts other than 192.168.1.10.

If you want a rule to apply to all containers, rather than a specific container, you can bind it to the docker0 interface rather than a specific ip address:

-A FORWARD -o docker0 -p tcp --dport 80 \! -s 192.168.1.10 -j DROP

This would prohibit access to port 80 on any container.

2
  • Thank you! Like I wrote I do sadly not really have much knowledge about iptables at all. Did simply create the above file myself because I thought it could maybe somehow work. But is actually not really important, just put it in as example of one of the many things I tried. What I want is that it simply works like expected. That the docker-container-ports behave the same like all other ones. That everything I do not have whitelisted gets blocked. Currently as soon as I start a container with "-p 123:123" the port 123 is open to the world (instead of being blocked because of the drop-all-rule).
    – janober
    Jun 11, 2015 at 2:44
  • Great, thank you seems exactly like what I am looking for. But was wondering if there is a way to avoid hard coding the ip address. Because I would have to add the above to a startup script. When I now stop and start a few containers it will not work anymore because the ip addresses are now totally different and I would then have to edit the iptables again and if I ever forget I would leave it open to the world. To make it simpler. Can I have a rule like above that simply applies to all docker-containers and not to a specific one?
    – janober
    Jun 11, 2015 at 14:35
3

Given: Debian stretch, docker 18.06, and a docker process created via

docker run ... -p 5678:1234 ...

Required: Access to the docker container restricted to multiple external subnetworks.

Solution: (using some example subnetworks)

iptables -I DOCKER-USER                  -p tcp --dport 1234 -j REJECT
iptables -I DOCKER-USER -s 18.204.0.0/16 -p tcp --dport 1234 -j RETURN
iptables -I DOCKER-USER -s 34.192.0.0/16 -p tcp --dport 1234 -j RETURN
iptables -I DOCKER-USER -s 35.153.0.0/16 -p tcp --dport 1234 -j RETURN
iptables -I DOCKER-USER -s 13.56.63.0/24 -p tcp --dport 1234 -j RETURN

Persist the changed rules using iptables-save:

iptables-save > /etc/iptables/rules.v4

(Don't forget to enable netfilter-persistent, which may require to run sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent.)

Result:

iptables -L DOCKER-USER -n -v --line-numbers

Chain DOCKER-USER (1 references)
pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination
0     0 RETURN     tcp  --  *      *       13.56.63.0/24        0.0.0.0/0            tcp dpt:1234
0     0 RETURN     tcp  --  *      *       35.153.0.0/16        0.0.0.0/0            tcp dpt:1234
0     0 RETURN     tcp  --  *      *       34.192.0.0/16        0.0.0.0/0            tcp dpt:1234
0     0 RETURN     tcp  --  *      *       18.204.0.0/16        0.0.0.0/0            tcp dpt:1234
0     0 REJECT     tcp  --  *      *       0.0.0.0/0            0.0.0.0/0            tcp dpt:1234 reject-with icmp-port-unreachable

Background 1: Rules

All rules are added to the chain DOCKER-USER as recommended by the current docker documentation.

The first rule targets REJECT and will end up as the last rule, since the other rules are added on top (option -I without a position number corresponds to adding a rule at position 1). All packages with destination port 1234 reaching this rule will be rejected.

The other rules target RETURN, i.e. a package with destination port 1234 and source IP from one of the given subnetworks will be returned to the calling chain, which is the FORWARD chain.

iptables -L FORWARD -n -v
Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT 0 packets, 0 bytes)
pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination
16471 4568K DOCKER-USER  all  --  *      *       0.0.0.0/0            0.0.0.0/0
16413 4565K DOCKER-ISOLATION-STAGE-1  all  --  *      *       0.0.0.0/0            0.0.0.0/0
7173 2060K ACCEPT     all  --  *      docker0  0.0.0.0/0            0.0.0.0/0            ctstate RELATED,ESTABLISHED
45  2340 DOCKER     all  --  *      docker0  0.0.0.0/0            0.0.0.0/0

From the FORWARD chain, it will be processed by the DOCKER chain, where it is forwarded as desired to the docker container:

iptables -L DOCKER -n -v
Chain DOCKER (1 references)
pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination
45  2340 ACCEPT     tcp  --  !docker0 docker0  0.0.0.0/0            172.17.0.2           tcp dpt:1234

Background 2: Port value

We don't use the external port value 5678 in the forward rule, because the destination port is changed via a rule automatically created by docker and applied before the forward chain is executed. See top section of /etc/iptables/rules.v4:

-A PREROUTING -m addrtype --dst-type LOCAL -j DOCKER
...
-A DOCKER ! -i docker0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 5678 -j DNAT --to-destination 172.17.0.2:1234
2

Ended up doing more or less exactly what larsks said. Just did not add it to the FORWARD chain, I added it to the DOCKER chain instead.

I've found the same in the docs: https://docs.docker.com/v1.5/articles/networking/#the-world

Docker will not delete or modify any pre-existing rules from the DOCKER filter chain. This allows the user to create in advance any rules required to further restrict access to the containers.

Docker's forward rules permit all external source IPs by default. To allow only a specific IP or network to access the containers, insert a negated rule at the top of the DOCKER filter chain. For example, to restrict external access such that only source IP 8.8.8.8 can access the containers, the following rule could be added:

$ iptables -I DOCKER -i ext_if ! -s 8.8.8.8 -j DROP
2

To use iptables on published ports from docker containers, you need a combination of things:

  • DOCKER-USER table: docker uses this table for iptables rules that affect containers and is reserved specifically for user provided rules that won't be overwritten by the docker engine when it restarts.
  • conntrack: port forwarding can publish on one port and forward to another in the container. You can have multiple containers all listening on port 80 with different published ports on the host.

To use these, the resulting iptables rule looks like:

iptables -I DOCKER-USER -i eth0 -s 10.0.0.0/24 -p tcp \
  -m conntrack --ctorigdstport 8080 -j ACCEPT
iptables -I DOCKER-USER -i eth0 ! -s 10.0.0.0/24 -p tcp \
  -m conntrack --ctorigdstport 8080 -j DROP

This handles requests to the published port 8080/tcp (that's on the host, the container could be listening on 80 or any other port), and only accepts the requests from the 10.0.0.0/24 subnet. Everything outside of that subnet is dropped.

Note that the DOCKER-USER table has a default rule to immediately return, so all changes should be inserted before that default rule in the table.

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