80

I was thinking along the lines of using typeid() but I don't know how to ask if that type is a subclass of another class (which, by the way, is abstract)

  • I just wonder if there is a way to check if an object's type is a particular subclass at compile-time in C++, because std::is_base_of won't work as desired. :3 – KaiserKatze Jan 15 at 13:31

11 Answers 11

39

You really shouldn't. If your program needs to know what class an object is, that usually indicates a design flaw. See if you can get the behavior you want using virtual functions. Also, more information about what you are trying to do would help.

I am assuming you have a situation like this:

class Base;
class A : public Base {...};
class B : public Base {...};

void foo(Base *p)
{
  if(/* p is A */) /* do X */
  else /* do Y */
}

If this is what you have, then try to do something like this:

class Base
{
  virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class A : public Base
{
  void bar() {/* do X */}
};

class B : public Base
{
  void bar() {/* do Y */}
};

void foo(Base *p)
{
  p->bar();
}

Edit: Since the debate about this answer still goes on after so many years, I thought I should throw in some references. If you have a pointer or reference to a base class, and your code needs to know the derived class of the object, then it violates Liskov substitution principle. Uncle Bob calls this an "anathema to Object Oriented Design".

| improve this answer | |
  • 20
    +1. I think the correct name for this is "Tell, don't ask". Basically, always favour polymorphism (TELLing an object what to do, letting the implementation take care of it) over a case/if statement where you ASK to find out what type of object you are dealing with. – LeopardSkinPillBoxHat Nov 21 '08 at 4:09
  • 61
    yep - this is all good - but the guy wanted to know about how to resolve type – JohnIdol Nov 21 '08 at 8:50
  • 7
    @Dima, and what if someone wants to know the syntax just for learning purposes (let's say they are going through a book written in Java, about design flaws, and they need to translate that to C++)? – patchwork Feb 5 '14 at 9:38
  • 8
    @Dima Ever worked with external library that defines superclasses? Try applying your answer there please. – Tomáš Zato - Reinstate Monica Sep 15 '15 at 6:20
  • 13
    This answer makes the rather huge assumption that you have control over the types you need to cast to and can rewrite them... For example I'm adding a feature to a GUI library based on another GUI library, and I need to know if the parent of a widget is scrollable. The original library offers no way to test this so I have to try and cast my widgets parent to the base-class of scrollable widgets, which really sucks. Anyway the point is that you left out the actual answer to the question at hand. – AnorZaken Jul 31 '16 at 1:48
124

 

class Base
{
  public: virtual ~Base() {}
};

class D1: public Base {};

class D2: public Base {};

int main(int argc,char* argv[]);
{
  D1   d1;
  D2   d2;

  Base*  x = (argc > 2)?&d1:&d2;

  if (dynamic_cast<D2*>(x) == nullptr)
  {
    std::cout << "NOT A D2" << std::endl;
  }
  if (dynamic_cast<D1*>(x) == nullptr)
  {
    std::cout << "NOT A D1" << std::endl;
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Do you really need a dynamic_cast<> here? Wouldn't a static_cast<> be enough? – krlmlr Dec 14 '16 at 14:03
  • 15
    @krlmlr. Can you tell the type of x at compile time? If so then static_cast<>() would work. If you can't tell the type of x until runtime then you need dynamic_cast<>() – Martin York Dec 15 '16 at 3:45
  • Thanks. I'm using downcasts mostly in the CRTP, I keep forgetting about other use cases ;-) – krlmlr Dec 15 '16 at 10:49
  • Good answer, but something to note here. The ternary conditional operator requires its second and third operands to have the same type. Therefore idk how this can work for anybody this way, use an if/else instead. Maybe this worked in the past? Anyhow. – Nikos Apr 10 at 21:47
  • @Nikos, It works because: 1. C++ does not require ternary's cases be the same type, 2. They're type of derived class pointer, and derived class pointer implicity casts to base. – hazer_hazer Jul 14 at 13:21
30

You can do it with dynamic_cast (at least for polymorphic types).

Actually, on second thought--you can't tell if it is SPECIFICALLY a particular type with dynamic_cast--but you can tell if it is that type or any subclass thereof.

template <class DstType, class SrcType>
bool IsType(const SrcType* src)
{
  return dynamic_cast<const DstType*>(src) != nullptr;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • When is a subclass not a polymorphic type? – OJFord Apr 16 '15 at 11:41
  • 6
    @OllieFord: when there aren't any virtual functions. – Drew Hall Apr 16 '15 at 13:25
  • Said differently, when std::is_polymorphic_v<T> is false. – Xeverous May 30 at 14:44
7

The code below demonstrates 3 different ways of doing it:

  • virtual function
  • typeid
  • dynamic_cast
#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <typeindex>

enum class Type {Base, A, B};

class Base {
public:
    virtual ~Base() = default;
    virtual Type type() const {
        return Type::Base;
    }
};

class A : public Base {
    Type type() const override {
        return Type::A;
    }
};

class B : public Base {
    Type type() const override {
        return Type::B;
    }
};

int main()
{
    const char *typemsg;
    A a;
    B b;
    Base *base = &a;             // = &b;    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Base &bbb = *base;

    // below you can replace    base    with  &bbb    and get the same results

    // USING virtual function
    // ======================
    // classes need to be in your control
    switch(base->type()) {
    case Type::A:
        typemsg = "type A";
        break;
    case Type::B:
        typemsg = "type B";
        break;
    default:
        typemsg = "unknown";
    }
    std::cout << typemsg << std::endl;

    // USING typeid
    // ======================
    // needs RTTI. under gcc, avoid -fno-rtti
    std::type_index ti(typeid(*base));
    if (ti == std::type_index(typeid(A))) {
        typemsg = "type A";
    } else if (ti == std::type_index(typeid(B))) {
        typemsg = "type B";
    } else {
        typemsg = "unknown";
    }
    std::cout << typemsg << std::endl;

    // USING dynamic_cast
    // ======================
    // needs RTTI. under gcc, avoid -fno-rtti
    if (dynamic_cast</*const*/ A*>(base)) {
        typemsg = "type A";
    } else if (dynamic_cast</*const*/ B*>(base)) {
        typemsg = "type B";
    } else {
        typemsg = "unknown";
    }
    std::cout << typemsg << std::endl;
}

The program above prints this:

type A
type A
type A
| improve this answer | |
6

dynamic_cast can determine if the type contains the target type anywhere in the inheritance hierarchy (yes, it's a little-known feature that if B inherits from A and C, it can turn an A* directly into a C*). typeid() can determine the exact type of the object. However, these should both be used extremely sparingly. As has been mentioned already, you should always be avoiding dynamic type identification, because it indicates a design flaw. (also, if you know the object is for sure of the target type, you can do a downcast with a static_cast. Boost offers a polymorphic_downcast that will do a downcast with dynamic_cast and assert in debug mode, and in release mode it will just use a static_cast).

| improve this answer | |
4

I disagree that you should never want to check an object's type in C++. If you can avoid it, I agree that you should. Saying you should NEVER do this under any circumstance is going too far though. You can do this in a great many languages, and it can make your life a lot easier. Howard Pinsley, for instance, showed us how in his post on C#.

I do a lot of work with the Qt Framework. In general, I model what I do after the way they do things (at least when working in their framework). The QObject class is the base class of all Qt objects. That class has the functions isWidgetType() and isWindowType() as a quick subclass check. So why not be able to check your own derived classes, which is comparable in it's nature? Here is a QObject spin off of some of these other posts:

class MyQObject : public QObject
{
public:
    MyQObject( QObject *parent = 0 ) : QObject( parent ){}
    ~MyQObject(){}

    static bool isThisType( const QObject *qObj )
    { return ( dynamic_cast<const MyQObject*>(qObj) != NULL ); }
};

And then when you are passing around a pointer to a QObject, you can check if it points to your derived class by calling the static member function:

if( MyQObject::isThisType( qObjPtr ) ) qDebug() << "This is a MyQObject!";
| improve this answer | |
4

I don't know if I understand your problem correctly, so let me restate it in my own words...

Problem: Given classes B and D, determine if D is a subclass of B (or vice-versa?)

Solution: Use some template magic! Okay, seriously you need to take a look at LOKI, an excellent template meta-programming library produced by the fabled C++ author Andrei Alexandrescu.

More specifically, download LOKI and include header TypeManip.h from it in your source code then use the SuperSubclass class template as follows:

if(SuperSubClass<B,D>::value)
{
...
}

According to documentation, SuperSubClass<B,D>::value will be true if B is a public base of D, or if B and D are aliases of the same type.

i.e. either D is a subclass of B or D is the same as B.

I hope this helps.

edit:

Please note the evaluation of SuperSubClass<B,D>::value happens at compile time unlike some methods which use dynamic_cast, hence there is no penalty for using this system at runtime.

| improve this answer | |
3
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream.h>

class Base
{
  public: virtual ~Base() {}

  template<typename T>
  bool isA() {
    return (dynamic_cast<T*>(this) != NULL);
  }
};

class D1: public Base {};
class D2: public Base {};
class D22: public D2 {};

int main(int argc,char* argv[]);
{
  D1*   d1  = new D1();
  D2*   d2  = new D2();
  D22*  d22 = new D22();

  Base*  x = d22;

  if( x->isA<D22>() )
  {
    std::cout << "IS A D22" << std::endl;
  }
  if( x->isA<D2>() )
  {
    std::cout << "IS A D2" << std::endl;
  }
  if( x->isA<D1>() )
  {
    std::cout << "IS A D1" << std::endl;
  }
  if(x->isA<Base>() )
  {
    std::cout << "IS A Base" << std::endl;
  }
}

Result:

IS A D22
IS A D2
IS A Base
| improve this answer | |
1

You can only do it at compile time using templates, unless you use RTTI.

It lets you use the typeid function which will yield a pointer to a type_info structure which contains information about the type.

Read up on it at Wikipedia

| improve this answer | |
  • Voted up for mentioning RTTI in this context, which everybody else just ignored. – ManuelSchneid3r Jul 19 '16 at 20:57
1

In c# you can simply say:

if (myObj is Car) {

}
| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    I answered this before the poster edit-ed his question and indicated his language choice. – Howard Pinsley Nov 21 '08 at 20:05
  • 1
    I am upvoting, it's not answer's fault that the OP specified his request. – Tomáš Zato - Reinstate Monica Sep 15 '15 at 14:43
1

I was thinking along the lines of using typeid()...

Well, yes, it could be done by comparing: typeid().name(). If we take the already described situation, where:

class Base;
class A : public Base {...};
class B : public Base {...};

void foo(Base *p)
{
  if(/* p is A */) /* do X */
  else /* do Y */
}

A possible implementation of foo(Base *p) would be:

#include <typeinfo>

void foo(Base *p)
{
    if(typeid(*p) == typeid(A))
    {
        // the pointer is pointing to the derived class A
    }  
    else if (typeid(*p).name() == typeid(B).name()) 
    {
        // the pointer is pointing to the derived class B
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Why do you mix comarison of typeid().name() and typeid()? Why not always comparing typeid()? – Silicomancer Mar 5 at 21:14

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