31

How can I list the contents of a zipped folder in C#? For example how to know how many items are contained within a zipped folder, and what is their name?

  • 1
    In case of .NET 4.5 or newer you don't need 3rd party library any more! See my answer below! – Csaba Toth Jul 7 '15 at 15:32
34

DotNetZip - Zip file manipulation in .NET languages

DotNetZip is a small, easy-to-use class library for manipulating .zip files. It can enable .NET applications written in VB.NET, C#, any .NET language, to easily create, read, and update zip files.

sample code to read a zip:

using (var zip = ZipFile.Read(PathToZipFolder))
{
    int totalEntries = zip.Entries.Count; 
    foreach (ZipEntry e in zip.Entries)
    {
        e.FileName ...
        e.CompressedSize ...
        e.LastModified...
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
28

.NET 4.5 or newer finally has built-in capability to handle generic zip files with the System.IO.Compression.ZipArchive class (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.compression.ziparchive%28v=vs.110%29.aspx) in assembly System.IO.Compression. No need for any 3rd party library.

string zipPath = @"c:\example\start.zip";
using (ZipArchive archive = ZipFile.OpenRead(zipPath))
{
    foreach (ZipArchiveEntry entry in archive.Entries)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(entry.FullName);
    }
} 
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  • 5
    Works fine and out of the box without 3rd party components. Be sure to add references System.IO.Compression.dll and System.IO.Compression.FileSystem.dll. – Matt Nov 17 '15 at 12:22
21

If you are using .Net Framework 3.0 or later, check out the System.IO.Packaging Namespace. This will remove your dependancy on an external library.

Specifically check out the ZipPackage Class.

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  • 1
    It removes dependency on an external library, but the usability of ZipPackage is really not very good. Everything is a trade off! – Cheeso Mar 8 '09 at 22:46
  • ZipPackage is tailored to handle mainly those Microsoft related file formats which internally are zip files, such as: docx, xlsx, XPS, nupkg... . From generic zip file point of view these only differ because of the presence of Content_Type.xml file placed in the root of the archive. If you cannot use .NET 4.5, but can use .NET 3.0, ZipPackage can be perfect given that you produce and consume the files. – Csaba Toth Feb 13 '14 at 23:22
  • 1
    For .NET 4.5 or later though should use ZipArchive class for generic zip purposes, see my answer below – Csaba Toth Jul 8 '15 at 22:29
12

Check into SharpZipLib

ZipInputStream inStream = new ZipInputStream(File.OpenRead(fileName));

while (inStream.GetNextEntry())
{

     ZipEntry entry = inStream.GetNextEntry();
     //write out your entry's filename
}
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6

Ick - that code using the J# runtime is hideous! And I don't agree that it is the best way - J# is out of support now. And it is a HUGE runtime, if all you want is ZIP support.

How about this - it uses DotNetZip (Free, MS-Public license)

using (ZipFile zip = ZipFile.Read(zipfile) )
{
    bool header = true;
    foreach (ZipEntry e in zip)
    {
        if (header)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Zipfile: {0}", zip.Name);
            if ((zip.Comment != null) && (zip.Comment != ""))
                System.Console.WriteLine("Comment: {0}", zip.Comment);

            System.Console.WriteLine("\n{1,-22} {2,9}  {3,5}   {4,9}  {5,3} {6,8} {0}",
                                     "Filename", "Modified", "Size", "Ratio", "Packed", "pw?", "CRC");
            System.Console.WriteLine(new System.String('-', 80));
            header = false;
        }

        System.Console.WriteLine("{1,-22} {2,9} {3,5:F0}%   {4,9}  {5,3} {6:X8} {0}",
                                 e.FileName,
                                 e.LastModified.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"),
                                 e.UncompressedSize,
                                 e.CompressionRatio,
                                 e.CompressedSize,
                                 (e.UsesEncryption) ? "Y" : "N",
                                 e.Crc32);

        if ((e.Comment != null) && (e.Comment != ""))
            System.Console.WriteLine("  Comment: {0}", e.Comment);
    }
}
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4

I'm relatively new here so maybe I'm not understanding what's going on. :-) There are currently 4 answers on this thread where the two best answers have been voted down. (Pearcewg's and cxfx's) The article pointed to by pearcewg is important because it clarifies some licensing issues with SharpZipLib. We recently evaluated several .Net compression libraries, and found that DotNetZip is currently the best aleternative.

Very short summary:

  • System.IO.Packaging is significantly slower than DotNetZip.

  • SharpZipLib is GPL - see article.

So for starters, I voted those two answers up.

Kim.

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  • 1
    The GPL itself specifically addresses the issue of portions of a program that are not "derivative" of the GPLed code, and their right to be licensed independently. I fail to see how SharpZipLib being GPL is a significant issue. – GalacticCowboy Nov 24 '08 at 21:26
  • 2
    GC, you are saying that if a group or org has a problem with the GPL, then the group is wrong? Or is it that you just cannot possibly understand how anyone would have an issue with the GPL, ever? It's not so hard to believe. The press is rife with stories of expensive legal tests. – Cheeso Mar 8 '09 at 22:45
  • 3
    Yeah, GPL is viral. If he's making commercial closed source software, and he links his code to a GPLed library, then he has to release his source under a GPL compatible license. So yes, the fact that the SharpZibLib is GPL is a significant issue. – cdmckay Jun 1 '09 at 23:59
  • 1
    This post is: a commentary on other answers; a discussion about licencing (important in any context but not uniquely so here and not relevant to the question); a record of how you voted; and some library recommendations. What it isn't: an answer to the question "How to list the contents of a .zip folder in c#?". – Stephen Kennedy Apr 5 '18 at 11:16
4

If you are like me and do not want to use an external component, here is some code I developed last night using .NET's ZipPackage class.

var zipFilePath = "c:\\myfile.zip";
var tempFolderPath = "c:\\unzipped";

using (Package package = ZipPackage.Open(zipFilePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
{
    foreach (PackagePart part in package.GetParts())
    {
        var target = Path.GetFullPath(Path.Combine(tempFolderPath, part.Uri.OriginalString.TrimStart('/')));
        var targetDir = target.Remove(target.LastIndexOf('\\'));

        if (!Directory.Exists(targetDir))
            Directory.CreateDirectory(targetDir);

        using (Stream source = part.GetStream(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            source.CopyTo(File.OpenWrite(target));
        }
    }
}

Things to note:

  • The ZIP archive MUST have a [Content_Types].xml file in its root. This was a non-issue for my requirements as I will control the zipping of any ZIP files that get extracted through this code. For more information on the [Content_Types].xml file, please refer to: A New Standard For Packaging Your Data There is an example file below Figure 13 of the article.

  • This code uses the Stream.CopyTo method in .NET 4.0

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0

The best way is to use the .NET built in J# zip functionality, as shown in MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164129.aspx. In this link there is a complete working example of an application reading and writing to zip files. For the concrete example of listing the contents of a zip file (in this case a Silverlight .xap application package), the code could look like this:


ZipFile package = new ZipFile(packagePath);
java.util.Enumeration entries = package.entries();
//We have to use Java enumerators because we
//use java.util.zip for reading the .zip files
while ( entries.hasMoreElements() )
{
    ZipEntry entry = (ZipEntry) entries.nextElement();

    if (!entry.isDirectory())
    {
        string name = entry.getName();
        Console.WriteLine("File: " + name + ", size: " + entry.getSize() + ", compressed size: " + entry.getCompressedSize());
    }
    else
    {
        // Handle directories...
    }                        
}

Aydsman had a right pointer, but there are problems. Specifically, you might find issues opening zip files, but is a valid solution if you intend to only create pacakges. ZipPackage implements the abstract Package class and allows manipulation of zip files. There is a sample of how to do it in MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms771414.aspx. Roughly the code would look like this:

             string packageRelationshipType = @"http://schemas.microsoft.com/opc/2006/sample/document";
            string resourceRelationshipType = @"http://schemas.microsoft.com/opc/2006/sample/required-resource";
            // Open the Package.
            // ('using' statement insures that 'package' is
            //  closed and disposed when it goes out of scope.)
            foreach (string packagePath in downloadedFiles)
            {
                Logger.Warning("Analyzing " + packagePath);
                using (Package package = Package.Open(packagePath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
                {
                    Logger.OutPut("package opened");
                    PackagePart documentPart = null;
                    PackagePart resourcePart = null;

                    // Get the Package Relationships and look for
                    //   the Document part based on the RelationshipType
                    Uri uriDocumentTarget = null;
                    foreach (PackageRelationship relationship in
                        package.GetRelationshipsByType(packageRelationshipType))
                    {
                        // Resolve the Relationship Target Uri
                        //   so the Document Part can be retrieved.
                        uriDocumentTarget = PackUriHelper.ResolvePartUri(
                            new Uri("/", UriKind.Relative), relationship.TargetUri);

                        // Open the Document Part, write the contents to a file.
                        documentPart = package.GetPart(uriDocumentTarget);
                        //ExtractPart(documentPart, targetDirectory);
                        string stringPart = documentPart.Uri.ToString().TrimStart('/');
                        Logger.OutPut("  Got: " + stringPart);
                    }

                    // Get the Document part's Relationships,
                    //   and look for required resources.
                    Uri uriResourceTarget = null;
                    foreach (PackageRelationship relationship in
                        documentPart.GetRelationshipsByType(
                                                resourceRelationshipType))
                    {
                        // Resolve the Relationship Target Uri
                        //   so the Resource Part can be retrieved.
                        uriResourceTarget = PackUriHelper.ResolvePartUri(
                            documentPart.Uri, relationship.TargetUri);

                        // Open the Resource Part and write the contents to a file.
                        resourcePart = package.GetPart(uriResourceTarget);

                        //ExtractPart(resourcePart, targetDirectory);
                        string stringPart = resourcePart.Uri.ToString().TrimStart('/');
                        Logger.OutPut("  Got: " + stringPart);
                    }

                }
            }

The best way seems to use J#, as shown in MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164129.aspx

There are pointers to more c# .zip libraries with different licenses, like SharpNetZip and DotNetZip in this article: how to read files from uncompressed zip in c#?. They might be unsuitable because of the license requirements.

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  • 5
    no, this is not the best. The J# runtime is based on an old Java library, the zip stuff has bugs, and it is going out of support. – Cheeso Mar 27 '09 at 5:15

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