40

I have the following code:

List<Long> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add(4L);
list.add(92L);
list.add(100L);
List<Long> newList = list.stream().map(i -> i * 2.5)
                                  .mapToLong(Double::doubleToRawLongBits)
                                  .collect(Collectors.toList());

This code doesn't work and the compilation error is:

method collect in interface java.util.stream.LongStream cannot be applied to given types;
required: java.util.function.Supplier<R>,java.util.function.ObjLongConsumer<R>,java.util.function.BiConsumer<R,R>
found: java.util.stream.Collector<java.lang.Object,capture#1 of ?,java.util.List<java.lang.Object>>
reason: cannot infer type-variable(s) R (actual and formal argument lists differ in length)

I have tried many usages of Collectors but I still can't make it to work. What am I doing wrong?

4
  • 1
    What exactly do you think Double.doubleToRawLongBits does? I don't think you know what it does... Jun 11, 2015 at 15:39
  • It becomes DoubleStream after multiplication by 2.5.
    – aldrael
    Jun 11, 2015 at 15:40
  • 1
    @aldrael: incorrect. It becomes a Stream<Double>, which is not the same thing. Jun 11, 2015 at 15:40
  • @LouisWasserman could you tell me something more?
    – aldrael
    Jun 11, 2015 at 15:46

6 Answers 6

103

mapToLong gives you a LongStream which is not able to be collect-ed by Collectors.toList.

This is because LongStream is

A sequence of primitive long-valued elements

We can't have a List<long>, we need a List<Long>. Therefore to be able to collect them we first need to box these primitive longs into Long objects:

list.stream().map(i -> i * 2.5)
    .mapToLong(Double::doubleToRawLongBits)
    .boxed()                                //< I added this line
    .collect(Collectors.toList());

The boxed method gives us a Stream<Long> which we're able to collect to a list.

Using map rather than mapToLong will also work because that will result in a Steam<Long> where the values are automatically boxed:

list.stream().map(i -> i * 2.5)
    .map(Double::doubleToRawLongBits)
    .collect(Collectors.toList());
1
  • 7
    This is the best answer because it helps me, as a programmer who is new to Java 8, understand the "why". Thank you so much!
    – Eddified
    Feb 14, 2018 at 17:34
17

This should compile if you use map instead of mapToLong. (I'm not sure what you are trying to do with doubleToRawLongBits makes any sense, but that will at least compile.)

2
  • The point is I want to receive List<Long>, but using only map() and collect() I receive List<Double>.
    – aldrael
    Jun 11, 2015 at 15:45
  • 2
    @aldrael: no. Replacing mapToLong with map works fine. Just try. Jun 11, 2015 at 15:48
6

Not sure what you expect your results to look like but this generates a List<Long>.

public void test() {
    List<Long> list = new ArrayList<>();
    list.add(4L);
    list.add(92L);
    list.add(100L);
    List<Long> newList = list.stream()
            // Times 1.5.
            .map(i -> i * 2.5)
            // Grab the long bits.
            .mapToLong(Double::doubleToRawLongBits)
            // Box them.
            .boxed()
            // Make a list.
            .collect(Collectors.toList());
    System.out.println(newList);
}
1
  • 4
    mapToLong(f).boxed() is fully equivalent to map(f). Jun 11, 2015 at 16:11
1

It’s not clear why you want to use doubleToRawLongBits. If your problem is that the multiplication with 2.5 produces double rather than long, you need a type cast to convert the value, as doubleToRawLongBits is not the canonical way of converting double to long. Instead, this method returns the IEEE 754 representation of the value which is only interesting in very special cases. Note that you can perform the conversion right inside the first map operation:

List<Long> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add(4L);
list.add(92L);
list.add(100L);

List<Long> newList = list.stream().map(i -> (long)(i * 2.5))
                         .collect(Collectors.toList());

This even applies if you really want the IEEE 754 representation of double values:

List<Long> newList = list.stream().map(i -> Double.doubleToRawLongBits(i * 2.5))
                         .collect(Collectors.toList());

But note that if you have a temporary list whose type matching the result type, you may perform the operation in-place instead of creating two lists (and going through the Stream API):

List<Long> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add(4L);
list.add(92L);
list.add(100L);
list.replaceAll(i -> (long)(i * 2.5));

again, the same applies even if you want IEEE 754 bits:

List<Long> list = new ArrayList<>();
list.add(4L);
list.add(92L);
list.add(100L);
list.replaceAll(i -> Double.doubleToRawLongBits(i * 2.5));

If you insist on using the Stream API, you may use the builder rather than an ArrayList for the source data:

Stream.Builder<Long> b = Stream.builder();
b.add(4L);
b.add(92L);
b.add(100L);
List<Long> newList = b.build().map(i -> (long)(i * 2.5))
                      .collect(Collectors.toList());
newList.forEach(System.out::println);
1

The essence of this problem is that the return value of function mapToLong is LongStream interface. LongStream only has method

 <R> R collect(Supplier<R> supplier,
               ObjLongConsumer<R> accumulator,
               BiConsumer<R, R> combiner);

You may be want to use method

<R, A> R collect(Collector<? super T, A, R> collector);

You can find this method in java.util.stream.Stream class.

the LongStream and Stream have no extend relationship.

0
    HashMap<String, Map<String, Long>> map = new HashMap<>();

    List<Entry<String, Map<String, Long>>> sortedList = map
    .entrySet()
    .stream()
    .sorted((a, b) -> Long.compare(
                                   a.getValue().values().stream().mapToLong(l -> l).sum(),
                                   b.getValue().values().stream().mapToLong(l -> l).sum()))

    .collect(Collectors.toList());

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