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What is the difference between performance.now() and Date.now()?

Should I consider performance.now() as a replacement for Date.now() since performace.now() is more consistent and independent?

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    No! Date.now()returns the number of milliseconds elapsed since 1 January 1970 00:00:00 UTC, performance.now() returns the number of milliseconds/microseconds elapsed since an arbitrary epoch. Basically, performance.now() should only be used when you want to measure the relative distance between two time points, not their "absolute" position in time. – user703016 Jun 12 '15 at 4:59
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    What @buttifulbuttefly says, plus ... performance.now offers more precise timing (sub-millisecond precision). – markE Jun 12 '15 at 4:59
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    Indeed, more precise timing, not more precise time. – Amadan Jun 12 '15 at 5:00
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    @markE This is not true anymore. Due to Spectre, the precision of performance.now is being limited – user5532169 Aug 6 '18 at 6:39
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They both serve different purposes.

performance.now() is relative to page load and more precise in orders of magnitude. Use cases include benchmarking and other cases where a high-resolution time is required such as media (gaming, audio, video, etc.)

It should be noted that performance.now() is only available in newer browsers (including IE10+).

Date.now() is relative to the Unix epoch (1970-01-01T00:00:00Z) and dependent on system clock. Use cases include same old date manipulation ever since the beginning of JavaScript.

See When milliseconds are not enough: performance.now and now method (Internet Explorer) - MSDN for more information.

The official W3C spec can be found here: High Resolution Time API

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    That precision comes at a cost. It's 50% slower. Good to know if you need it in a tight loop. jsperf.com/perf-vs-date/1 – Eyal May 4 '17 at 6:42
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    Oops, I meant 80% slower. :-( – Eyal May 4 '17 at 7:47
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    Keep in mind what google audits think about date.now() developers.google.com/web/tools/lighthouse/audits/date-now – StLia Oct 19 '17 at 9:08
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    currently in Firefox performance.now() is like 20% faster but in other browsers suprasingly slower like 60% - you can check for yourselfs: jsbench.me/s6jz9v29i3/1 – Picard Aug 13 '19 at 13:35
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    3x slower on my Raspberry Firefox. performance.now() seems not performant but is more precise. A few hundred measures will not affect performance anyway. – user985399 Oct 30 '19 at 15:33
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Date.now() returns the number of milliseconds elapsed since 1 January 1970 00:00:00 UTC, performance.now() returns the number of milliseconds, with microseconds in the fractional part, from performance.timing.navigationStart, the start of navigation of the document, to the performance.now() call. Another important difference between Date.now() and performance.now() is that the latter is monotonically increasing, so the difference between two calls will never be negative.

For better understanding visit the link.

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