1

This is my code:

class Horse:

    def talk(self):
        print 'Hihaaa!'


class Farm:

    def __init__(self, animal):
        self.animal = animal

    def animaltalk(self):
        self.animal.sing()


def main():
    horse = Horse()
    farm = Farm(horse)
    farm.animaltalk()


main()

This is my pylint:

$ pylint --version
No config file found, using default configuration
pylint 1.4.3, 
astroid 1.3.6, common 0.63.2
Python 2.7.6 (default, Mar 22 2014, 22:59:56) 
[GCC 4.8.2]

This is the output of pylint:

$ pylint farm.py

************* Module farm
C:  1, 0: Missing module docstring (missing-docstring)
C:  1, 0: Missing class docstring (missing-docstring)
C:  1, 0: Old-style class defined. (old-style-class)
W:  1, 0: Class has no __init__ method (no-init)
C:  3, 4: Missing method docstring (missing-docstring)
R:  3, 4: Method could be a function (no-self-use)
R:  1, 0: Too few public methods (1/2) (too-few-public-methods)
C:  7, 0: Missing class docstring (missing-docstring)
C:  7, 0: Old-style class defined. (old-style-class)
C: 12, 4: Missing method docstring (missing-docstring)
R:  7, 0: Too few public methods (1/2) (too-few-public-methods)
C: 16, 0: Missing function docstring (missing-docstring)

I am not interested in all those warnings/messages, unless they really have to do with my problem, which is: pylint is unable to tell me that self.animal.sing() is an error (it should be self.animal.talk()).

  • Is there a way of forcing pylint to perform a deeper analysis, or is this a fundamental limitation of the Python language?

  • Or is there a better pattern to code this kind of functionality (an object collecting other pre-instantiated objects), so that pylint can perform better error-checking?

The reason why I need this is that, in complex code, big refactorings cause errors that are not caught by pylint, which means that the only way to catch them is with testing; unfortunately, I have no tests for all my code paths. A better pylint analysis would go a long way towards solving obvious problems in my code.

  • I haven't found a "linter" for python that satisfies me. Try mypy, it's buggy in some cases but quite useful: mypy-lang.org Note that the pypi package mypy is unrelaged, you want pip3 install --user mypy-lang – o11c Jun 12 '15 at 7:40
  • 1
    That's not what pylint is for. Python is a dynamic language, and a static analysis cannot tell you whether Horse.sing is patched at runtime, or handled by __getattr__/__getattribute__, or ... – jonrsharpe Jun 12 '15 at 7:45
  • 1
    @jonrsharpe: well, pylint will very readily complain with Instance of 'Farm' has no 'animaltalk2' member if you are making the mistake of doing farm.animaltalk2(), and Farm could also be patched at runtime. – blueFast Jun 12 '15 at 7:48
  • 1
    That's true, but it only goes so deep; animal isn't required to be a Horse! – jonrsharpe Jun 12 '15 at 7:51
  • 1
    There are various options for type hinting (e.g. annotations in 3.x) but I don't think they'd catch this. You're going to need to add those tests! – jonrsharpe Jun 12 '15 at 7:59
4

Please report it to pylint's bug tracker: https://bitbucket.org/logilab/pylint/. That's actually a problem because in pylint, Instances don't know their arguments. This should be easily fixable.

0

Is there a way of forcing pylint to perform a deeper analysis

No.

or is this a fundamental limitation of the Python language?

Well, it’s theoretically possible to keep writing smarter and smarter analyzers. You could certainly write a Pylint plugin that would catch your particular error (but fail in other similar cases). There is PySonar2 which may or may not cover your case.

Or is there a better pattern to code this kind of functionality (an object collecting other pre-instantiated objects), so that pylint can perform better error-checking?

Good question. I find that there is often a way to tweak the code to make Pylint more useful on it. In your case, however, the best I can think of is using special subclasses of Farm, such as SingingFarm or HorseFarm, like this:

class Farm:

    def __init__(self, animal):
        self.animal = animal


class SingingFarm(Farm):

    def animalsing(self):
        self.animal.sing()

Then Pylint will complain if you call animalsing on a wrong type of Farm. Of course, this is a very limited approach that may not work for you.

Still, I believe grep is the only tool that can give you any sort of assurance when refactoring Python code. If I make my symbols unique enough (i.e. specific_term instead of value), and avoid dynamic attribute access as much as possible, at least I can count on grep to get me 99% of the way.

  • Your pattern does not fit my case. My farm is (in the general case) a group of three animals, horse, pig and duck, two persons, a truck and other stuff, and it gets passed those parameters on initialization. I prefer not to derive from many classes (pylint will complain if you derive from more than 6 classes I think), so what I do is to define the members of my Farm as attributes. – blueFast Jun 12 '15 at 13:54
  • I agree with your comment on grep, and I also use it extensively. – blueFast Jun 12 '15 at 13:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.