3

Is it possible to rewrite the following code, so that it would be ISO C compliant ? The following macros are doing a malloc & init for a given type and value.

The current code works with the gcc compilers (uses a gcc extension), but it's not standard. If I use -pedantic, I receive warnings.

#ifdef __GNUC__

#define NM_CVPTR(type, value) \
    ({ \
        type * var = NULL; \
        var = nm_malloc(sizeof(*var)); \
        *var = value; \
        (const void*) var; \
    }) \

#define NM_VPTR(type, value) \
    ({ \
        type * var = NULL; \
        var = nm_malloc(sizeof(*var)); \
        *var = value; \
        (void*) var; \
    }) \

#define NM_PTR(type, value) \
    ({ \
        type * var = NULL; \
        var = nm_malloc(sizeof(*var)); \
        *var = value; \
        (type *) var; \
    }) \

#endif
  • Please provide some explanation why inline functions cannot be used in the case. – Dummy00001 Jun 20 '10 at 20:03
  • Are inlines part of standard ? – Andrei Ciobanu Jun 20 '10 at 21:28
  • inline is part of C99. But I don't think it would help here, unless you want to write such an inline function for each type. (This is what I would do, too, but this wasn't the question.) – Jens Gustedt Jun 20 '10 at 21:57
3

This can be done using the comma operator, but in standard C you won't be able to declare a variable as part of an expression, so you will have to pass the name of var's replacement to the macro:

// C - comma operator but not able to declare the storage during the
// expression.
#define NM_PTR(type, var, value) \
    (var = nm_malloc(sizeof(*var)), \
    *var = value, \
    (type * var))

In some compilers and in C++, you can declare storage for var in-line as follows:

// C99 and C++
#define NM_PTR(type, value) \
    (type * var = nm_malloc(sizeof(*var)), \
    *var = value, \
    (type * var))

The difficulty with using the above macro is that there is no block scope in the macro body, so the definition of var is 'visible' at the block level and each macro can only be used once per block.

Edit: Thanks to Jens Gustedt for catching that the suggested C++ macro did not work.

  • Nice solution, thank you! – Andrei Ciobanu Jun 20 '10 at 17:57
  • I would be curious to know what compiler accepts your second version. I don't think this is C99 as your comment suggests, at least my compiler (gcc 4.3) is not happy with it. – Jens Gustedt Jun 20 '10 at 21:59
3

You can use memcpy to assign a value and then have the pointer returned. The following uses two different versions depending on whether or not your initial value is a primitive type (integer,float, pointers...) or if it is a struct. The value version uses a compound literal (type){ (value) }, so it is only valid in C99.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

static inline
void* memcpy_safe(void* target, void const* source, size_t n) {
  if (target) memcpy(target, source, n);
  return target;
}

#define NM_PTR_RVALUE(type, rvalue)                                     \
  ((type*)memcpy_safe(malloc(sizeof(type)), &(type){ (rvalue) }, sizeof(type)))

#define NM_PTR_LVALUE(type, lvalue)                                     \
  ((type*)memcpy_safe(malloc(sizeof(type)), &(lvalue), sizeof(type)))

typedef struct {
  int a;
} hoi;

hoi H7 = {.a = 7};

int main() {
  int* a = NM_PTR_RVALUE(int, 7);
  hoi* b = NM_PTR_LVALUE(hoi, H7);
}

(Added a NULL check here that uses an inline function, although this wasn't requested originally.)

BTW, in C++ in contrast to C the assignment operator = returns an lvalue, so for C++ you could probably play games with that.

  • Isn't it dangerous if malloc returns NULL? – Nyan Jun 21 '10 at 4:13
  • 1
    sure, but not more dangerous than the original version as presented in the question :-) – Jens Gustedt Jun 21 '10 at 6:03
  • Thanks for the solution. – Andrei Ciobanu Jun 21 '10 at 7:33

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