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Hi I am new to Linux Kernel Development. So want some clearity for the following statement.

*> In memory, every process is given a 4GB of virtual address space

considering a 32-bit architecture. The lower 3GB virtual addresses is accessible to the user space portion of the process and the upper 1GB is accessible to the kernel space portion.*

  1. Does it mean that each process in linux is allocated that much memory space 1GB+3GB?
  2. If yes then there are hundreds of process in linux , so 100*4GB space from where the system gets so much of memory space?
  3. What it has relation with the kernel stack and user stack ?
  4. Does every process in linux has kernel and user stack ?
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    You should learn how Virtual Memory is working. There is physical memory (actual RAM) and virtual memory (mappings to a RAM, which may exist or not). 4Gb is a limit of mappings (that is not necessary to be used entirely). – myaut Jun 13 '15 at 15:33
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Intro

Linux, like most modern operating systems, uses virtual pages provided by most modern architectures, including the x86 family.

In a system with virtual memory, the physical memory (actual RAM resource) is abstract from the process running on the system. An address space is just all the numbers where memory could be.

Paging

Memory can be mapped (put at an address) in pages which is the architecture dependent size of a memory chunk. So if you want to put memory at some address so the process can use it, then you'd have to pick a page aligned number (a multiple of the page size) and place at least one page there.

Protection

Virtual memory also allows for memory protection which sets what permissions the process will have. When a process's executable memory is mapped (the instructions it executes to do stuff) it is read/execute only. This means that the processor can execute that memory, and you can read it, but you can't write to it.

When a process is loaded from disk (in Linux with the exec system call) it is placed in memory with several regions of memory already mapped. These regions are the executable code from the program, data sections, and stack. The process can request more memory to be mapped later by using the mmap or brk system calls.

When a process tries to access memory it does not have mapped, it triggers the infamous SEGFAULT error, and the kernel will kill your program. Other times, the hardware will fault but the program does have memory mapped, this is because the kernel unmapped it to save it until it is needed. What happens here is the process stops running, the kernel remaps the memory, and your process starts running again like nothing happened.

Address Space

So the size of the address space is just the upper limit of the memory you could have if the program had mapped every address it possibly could to actual RAM memory.

The one gig address space to the kernel part is about the process's meta-data that the kernel keeps track of. For instance, it will keep a listing of open files, and mapped memory in the process headers. It will also keep thread headers there. Again, all of it is not mapped, only what it needs.

Note that each process has its own universe of addresses, it never sees what another process has mapped at those addresses. This way, the process can act as if it is the only process on the machine, mapping memory to any address it chooses.

Also note, the 4gb number is because the hardware that does addressing supports only 32 bit numbers, the largest number one can hold in a 32 bit number is 2^32 = 4,294,967,296. This is 4 gb. So one can only map 4gb of addresses to memory.

This is just a crappy intro, please do some googling on virtual memory.

  • This much i now but my question is that there are many processes running at a time like firefox chrome running at same time in linux. But if 4 gb is allocated to chrome how firefox will get memory fot its operation. – Dpk Jun 14 '15 at 16:45
  • Also what is the things that the kernel stack size is limites to 8KB. and what is its relation to the 1 GB of space. – Dpk Jun 14 '15 at 17:42
  • @Dpk That's what I attempted to say. A process doesn't have 4gb of actual RAM allocated to it. Each process starts off with a very small amount of memory (a few pages, a page on x86_64 is 4kb), as it allocates more memory, more pages are added. Each process is running by itself (exclusively on its own core) and is swapped out for other processes, when it is swapped in (scheduled) the memory for that process is mapped in the address space. So each process gets its own 4gb address space that does not clash with other programs. – cptaffe Jun 15 '15 at 0:09
  • @Dpk as for the stack size. I think you may be thinking 8mb, and its the kernel's limit on stack size. When a program is launched, it is given some pages for stack. To save memory, it does not map all of the stack pages at once, and the stack will grow. The stack is positioned at a high address and grows down towards lower addresses. When your program tries to access memory lower than what memory the kernel has mapped, the kernel will map more memory (same thing as SEGFAULT hardware interrupt except the kernel will just map more memory). That is, until it reaches a limit (8mb). – cptaffe Jun 15 '15 at 0:15
  • @Dpk Remember that there are never really more than one process running at a time (on a core). And each core has its own hardware for mapping memory (MMU). This is why firefox and chrome are not competing for space in the same 4gb memory space, because they never see each other. Their address spaces will never collide. – cptaffe Jun 15 '15 at 0:18
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Does it mean that each process in linux is allocated that much memory space 1GB+3GB?

No. All processes share the same kernel space. In addition, these are the maximum theoretical limits. They can be further restricted by system settings, process settings, and the size of the page file. Even if a system allowed a process to grow to the maximum side, processes generally start small and have to grow to reach the maximum.

If yes then there are hundreds of process in linux , so 100*4GB space from where the system gets so much of memory space?

See above. If allowed, such memory space would be on disk in the page file (partition).

What it has relation with the kernel stack and user stack ?

They are separate stacks. The kernel stack is located in the kernel space and the user stack is in the user space. The processor uses the kernel stack when executing in kernel mode and the user stack while in user mode. The switch is automatic as part of hardware switch between modes.

Does every process in linux has kernel and user stack ?

Yes. There is one for each thread. Kernel stacks tend to be small.

  • what is the things that the kernel stack size is limites to 8KB. and what is its relation to the 1 GB of space. Also how to know the size of user stack for the process ? – Dpk Jun 14 '15 at 19:28
  • I believe Linux limits the kernel stack to 2 pages (8KB). The kernel stack does relatively simple things so it does not need to be large. All kernel stacks are within the 1GB of system space. The stack size for a thread or process can change. – user3344003 Jun 14 '15 at 21:40
  • How ot know the size of user stack for a process/thread in linux. – Dpk Jun 15 '15 at 5:55

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