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So I'm trying to make an algorithm that starts at the first "room" and then recursively goes outward and starts deleting all rooms from the outside in. A room is a struct with 4 "doors" (pointers to rooms): North, South, East, and West.

The function takes two arguments: pointer to the current room and a char (to identify the direction: North, South, East, or West).

Here is my logic for the algorithm (roomDelete):

Base Case

  1. Start at the first room and call the function (roomDelete) on any non-NULL pointers; input to the function calls should be appropriate pointer to the room to the N/S/E/W, and appropriate char representing the direction N/S/E/W.
  2. Check to see that all pointers (N/S/E/W) are NULL --> delete this current room.
  3. Done/return.

Recursion

  1. Make sure not to backtrack (travel back in the direction you came from), by using a char to hold the value opposite of the direction char.
  2. Call the function on any non-NULL, non-backtrack pointers/directions.
  3. Break connection to previous room.
  4. Check to see that all pointers are NULL --> delete this current room.

Here is a simple picture on what the rooms/pointers look like: http://i.imgur.com/btKz5JB.png

I have code that I tried to test. If I have a room (by itself), then the function works. But as soon as another room is thrown into the mix, then the function never returns/finishes. I'm not sure why. Is my logic sound? Am I missing something? Any help is appreciated.

CODE:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
using namespace std;

#define NUM_DOORS 4

struct room {
    struct room * north;
    struct room * south;
    struct room * east;
    struct room * west;
} ;

int roomDelete(room *, char);

int main(void)
{
    room * test_ptr = new room;
    cout << "Created room at location: " << test_ptr << endl;
    test_ptr->north = NULL;
    test_ptr->south = NULL;
    test_ptr->east = NULL;
    test_ptr->west = NULL;

    test_ptr->north = new room;
    cout << "Created room at location: " << test_ptr->north << endl;
    test_ptr->north->north = NULL;
    test_ptr->north->south = test_ptr;
    test_ptr->north->east = NULL;
    test_ptr->north->west = NULL;

    int test = roomDelete(test_ptr, '\0');

    cout << test << endl;

    return 0;
}

int roomDelete(room * room_ptr, char coord)
{
    char coordinate[NUM_DOORS] = {'N', 'S', 'E', 'W'};
    char coordinate_opposite[NUM_DOORS] = {'S', 'N', 'W', 'E'};
    char coord_opp = '\0';

    // call function on any remaining rooms
    if(coord == '\0')   // this is the beginning/initial room
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < NUM_DOORS; i++)
        {
            switch (coordinate[i])
            {
                case 'N':
                {
                    if(room_ptr->north != NULL)
                        roomDelete(room_ptr->north, 'N');
                    break;
                }
                case 'S':
                {
                    if(room_ptr->south != NULL)
                        roomDelete(room_ptr->south, 'S');
                    break;
                }
                case 'E':
                {
                    if(room_ptr->east != NULL)
                        roomDelete(room_ptr->east, 'E');
                    break;
                }
                case 'W':
                {
                    if(room_ptr->west != NULL)
                        roomDelete(room_ptr->west, 'W');
                    break;
                }
                default:
                    cout << "There was an error deallocating for the room at location: " << room_ptr << endl;
            }
        }

        // delete the current room
        if(room_ptr->north == NULL && room_ptr->south == NULL && room_ptr->east == NULL && room_ptr->west == NULL)
        {
            cout << "Deleting room at location: " << room_ptr << endl;
            delete room_ptr;
        }
        else
            return 2;       // outward rooms have not been deleted yet
    }

    else        // recursion
    {
        // this sets the value for the door that won't be handed to the delete function
        for(int j = 0; j < NUM_DOORS; j++)
        {
            if(coord == coordinate[j])
                coord_opp = coordinate_opposite[j];
        }

        if(coord_opp == '\0')
        {
            cout << "An error occurred while setting the value of the opposite coordinate.\n";
            return 1;
        }

        // call the function on any remaining rooms
        for(int k = 0; k < NUM_DOORS; k++)
        {
            if(coordinate[k] != coord_opp)      // this is to avoid backtracking (which would cause infinite recursion)
            {
                switch (coordinate[k])
                {
                    case 'N':
                    {
                        if(room_ptr->north != NULL)
                            roomDelete(room_ptr->north, 'N');
                        break;
                    }
                    case 'S':
                    {
                        if(room_ptr->south != NULL)
                            roomDelete(room_ptr->south, 'S');
                        break;
                    }
                    case 'E':
                    {
                        if(room_ptr->east != NULL)
                            roomDelete(room_ptr->east, 'E');
                        break;
                    }
                    case 'W':
                    {
                        if(room_ptr->west != NULL)
                            roomDelete(room_ptr->west, 'W');
                        break;
                    }
                    default:
                        cout << "There was an error deallocating for the room at location: " << room_ptr << endl;
                }
            }
        }

        // delete connection (ptr's) between current room and previous
        switch(coord)
        {
            case 'N':
            {
                room_ptr->south->north = NULL;
                room_ptr->south = NULL;
            }
            case 'S':
            {
                room_ptr->north->south = NULL;
                room_ptr->north = NULL;
            }
            case 'E':
            {
                room_ptr->west->east = NULL;
                room_ptr->west = NULL;
            }
            case 'W':
            {
                room_ptr->east->west = NULL;
                room_ptr->east = NULL;
            }
            default:
                cout << "There was a problem with severing the connection for the room at location: " << room_ptr << endl;
        }

        // delete current room
        if(room_ptr->north == NULL && room_ptr->south == NULL && room_ptr->east == NULL && room_ptr->west == NULL)
        {
            cout << "Deleting room at location: " << room_ptr << endl;
            delete room_ptr;
        }
        else
            return 3;       // outward rooms have not been deleted yet
    }

    return 0;   // successful in deallocating the entire complex
}
  • Oh dear. You have to much complexity in your code. There is a very important coding rule - DRY: Don't Repeat Yourself. You have the same for and nested switch code two times in your code. Your code would be a lot easier to read if this would be another function. Functions are intended to be small and to call other functions. Robert C. Martin - the author of "Clean Code" suggests using at most 21 line functions which do exactly one thing and operate on the same abstraction level. Furthermore - the braces in the switch statements are not necessary - they only expand the code. – Adrian Jałoszewski Jun 13 '15 at 17:40
  • Thank you for the advice! – Max Jacob Jun 13 '15 at 17:55
  • Here's a more C++-like approach to implementing this: ideone.com/jAqWX9 But you might also want to consider looking at std::unique_ptr, std::shared_ptr and std::map. – kfsone Jun 13 '15 at 19:25
1

I don't understand your algorithm, but I can tell where you are failing.

switch (coord)
    {
    case 'N':{
        room_ptr->south->north = NULL;
        room_ptr->south = NULL;
    }

    case 'S':{
        room_ptr->north->south = NULL;  // <-- Program Fails Here
        room_ptr->north = NULL;
    }

room_ptr->north at this moment is a null pointer and you are thus writing at location you are not allowed to.

Maybe you don't fully understand switch statements? It has so called "fall-through" behavior , i.e. it doesn't break out by itself just because it is a new case, it will just find a place where to start executing code and keep executing it until it hits "}" or finds explicitly written "break;" in it's way.

  • Thank you so much! Great catch! I can't believe I forgot to put in break statements, haha. – Max Jacob Jun 13 '15 at 17:28
  • You are welcome. Besides... try separating big functions into smaller ones - your code will become more readable and maintainable. – Karlis Olte Jun 13 '15 at 17:31

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