8

I have a two lists and I want to check the similarity between each words in the two list and find out the maximum similarity.Here is my code,

from nltk.corpus import wordnet

list1 = ['Compare', 'require']
list2 = ['choose', 'copy', 'define', 'duplicate', 'find', 'how', 'identify', 'label', 'list', 'listen', 'locate', 'match', 'memorise', 'name', 'observe', 'omit', 'quote', 'read', 'recall', 'recite', 'recognise', 'record', 'relate', 'remember', 'repeat', 'reproduce', 'retell', 'select', 'show', 'spell', 'state', 'tell', 'trace', 'write']
list = []

for word1 in list1:
    for word2 in list2:
        wordFromList1 = wordnet.synsets(word1)[0]
        wordFromList2 = wordnet.synsets(word2)[0]
        s = wordFromList1.wup_similarity(wordFromList2)
        list.append(s)

print(max(list)) 

But this will result an error:

wordFromList2 = wordnet.synsets(word2)[0]
        IndexError: list index out of range

Please help me to fix this.
Thanking you

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12

You're getting an error if a synset list is empty, and you try to get the element at (non-existent) index zero. But why only check the zero'th element? If you want to check everything, try all pairs of elements in the returned synsets. You can use itertools.product() to save yourself two for-loops:

from itertools import product
sims = []

for word1, word2 in product(list1, list2):
    syns1 = wordnet.synsets(word1)
    syns2 = wordnet.synsets(word2)
    for sense1, sense2 in product(syns1, syns2):
        d = wordnet.wup_similarity(sense1, sense2)
        sims.append((d, syns1, syns2))

This is inefficient because the same synsets are looked up again and again, but it is the closest to the logic of your code. If you have enough data to make speed an issue, you can speed it up by collecting the synsets for all words in list1 and list2 once, and taking the product of the synsets.

>>> allsyns1 = set(ss for word in list1 for ss in wordnet.synsets(word))
>>> allsyns2 = set(ss for word in list2 for ss in wordnet.synsets(word))
>>> best = max((wordnet.wup_similarity(s1, s2) or 0, s1, s2) for s1, s2 in 
        product(allsyns1, allsyns2))
>>> print(best)
(0.9411764705882353, Synset('command.v.02'), Synset('order.v.01'))
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  • The second piece of code is awesome! Can you please tell me how to compare the synsets of the first list with the same words of the second list, without synsets? I tried to modify allsyns2 but I felt, I am fairly new to python and sorry this one line of code with two loops is confusing for me! – Hussein Sep 22 '17 at 19:32
  • 1
    I'm afraid i can't tell what you mean. Please expand this into a proper question, including example input & desired output (and any code you can manage, of course). – alexis Sep 23 '17 at 8:28
  • What I meant was one of the two lists is fixed and known, like this: list1 = ['word.n.01', 'word2.v.01'] . I stuck because I didn't know that there are two functions : 'wordnet.synsets(word)' and 'wordnet.synset(word)'. I removed the 's' like this: set(wordnet.synset(word) for word in list1) and it finally worked – Hussein Sep 23 '17 at 13:36
8

Try checking whether these lists are empty before you use then:

from nltk.corpus import wordnet

list1 = ['Compare', 'require']
list2 = ['choose', 'copy', 'define', 'duplicate', 'find', 'how', 'identify', 'label', 'list', 'listen', 'locate', 'match', 'memorise', 'name', 'observe', 'omit', 'quote', 'read', 'recall', 'recite', 'recognise', 'record', 'relate', 'remember', 'repeat', 'reproduce', 'retell', 'select', 'show', 'spell', 'state', 'tell', 'trace', 'write']
list = []

for word1 in list1:
    for word2 in list2:
        wordFromList1 = wordnet.synsets(word1)
        wordFromList2 = wordnet.synsets(word2)
        if wordFromList1 and wordFromList2: #Thanks to @alexis' note
            s = wordFromList1[0].wup_similarity(wordFromList2[0])
            list.append(s)

print(max(list))
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  • Pretty sure the if len... line will be a syntax error. Can also just test if len(blah1) and len(blah2): since he just needs to know they aren't empty. If an empty return from .synsets is rare, others would probably suggest just catching the IndexError. – abathur Jun 14 '15 at 13:07
  • @abathur Thanks, I corrected it. Regarding catch blocks - I agree, but I think that a word blah not having synonyms inside a second list is very common, hence I used if block – omerbp Jun 14 '15 at 13:15
  • 1
    Certainly; I haven't fiddled with that one, so I wasn't sure how common of a case it was. Sorry--I should've put that in a second comment directed at @punuth, I was mostly just noting it for their benefit, since they're the only one who'll know how often it's coming up empty. – abathur Jun 14 '15 at 13:19
  • 2
    Better and more "pythonic": if wordFromList2 and wordFromList2: .... Empty lists count as False. – alexis Jun 14 '15 at 23:45

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