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How do I interleave strings in Python?

Given

s1 = 'abc'
s2 = 'xyz'

How do I get axbycz?

  • 4
    No one is going to help you if you don't show some effort. Besides that, this question can be solved using Google. I don't like to say it, but in this case it is true: Google is your friend! – Felix Kling Jun 21 '10 at 10:28
  • 1
    Not sure what to call this - I've gone with "interleaving". – Dominic Rodger Jun 21 '10 at 10:33
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    I think I'd call it zip -ping ;) – badp Jun 21 '10 at 10:33
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    related: Most pythonic way to interleave two strings – jfs Mar 13 '18 at 20:34
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Here is one way to do it

>>> s1 = "abc"
>>> s2 = "xyz"
>>> "".join(i for j in zip(s1, s2) for i in j)
'axbycz'

It also works for more than 2 strings

>>> s3 = "123"
>>> "".join(i for j in zip(s1, s2, s3) for i in j)
'ax1by2cz3'

Here is another way

>>> "".join("".join(i) for i in zip(s1,s2,s3))
'ax1by2cz3'

And another

>>> from itertools import chain
>>> "".join(chain(*zip(s1, s2, s3)))
'ax1by2cz3'

And one without zip

>>> b = bytearray(6)
>>> b[::2] = "abc"
>>> b[1::2] = "xyz"
>>> str(b)
'axbycz'

And an inefficient one

>>> ((s1 + " " + s2) * len(s1))[::len(s1) + 1]
'axbycz'
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  • 2
    What to choose? Which one is the "preferably only one obvious way to do it"? – Vi. Jun 30 '11 at 19:43
  • @gnibbler And this one ? :) print ''.join(sum([ [a,b] for [a,b] in zip(s1,s2)],[])) . Upvoted though. – eyquem Jul 21 '11 at 17:56
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    I'd choose "".join("".join(i) for i in zip(s1,s2,s3)) since it's probably the easiest to parse with my eyeballs. – lysdexia Jul 21 '11 at 20:16
  • @eyquem, sum(...,[]) has quadradic performance (because it makes a new list each time it adds an element) – John La Rooy Jul 21 '11 at 21:38
  • @gnibbler In the doc: "sum(iterable[, start]) Sums start and the items of an iterable from left to right and returns the total." It doesn't say that a new object is created after each adding of an item rather than an in place adding. But you must be right, because if I do: li=[] print id(li) tot = sum([ [a,b] for [a,b] in zip(s1,s2)],li) print id(tot) , I obtain 18718112 and 18748560 – eyquem Jul 22 '11 at 1:02
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What about (if the strings are the same length):

s1='abc'
s2='xyz'
s3=''
for x in range(len(s1)):
   s3 += '%s%s'%(s1[x],s2[x])

I'd also like to note that THIS article is now the #1 Google search result for "python interleave strings," which given the above comments I find ironic :-)

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  • 1
    Stuff like this always happens on SO ;) – BoltClock Jul 21 '11 at 16:26
  • And it still is the #1 google search result for python interleave strings – cat Jan 2 '16 at 22:42
0
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A mathematical one, for fun

s1="abc"
s2="xyz"

lgth = len(s1)

ss = s1+s2

print ''.join(ss[i//2 + (i%2)*lgth] for i in xrange(2*lgth))

And another one:

s1="abc"
s2="xyz"

lgth = len(s1)

tu = (s1,s2)

print ''.join(tu[i%2][i//2] for i in xrange(2*lgth))
# or
print ''.join((tu[0] if i%2==0 else tu[1])[i//2] for i in xrange(2*lgth))
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