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I wasn't able to find a documentation for the widely used autoload command in zsh. Does anybody can explain it in plain English?

A bit more specific: What does autoloading of modules mean, for example in this line:

autoload -Uz vcs_info

What does it do?


I've tried autoload --help, man autoload, googling - no success. Thanks!

2
  • This question seems relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/4493173/… May 19, 2016 at 21:12
  • As a sidebar I'll just comment, since it's not mentioned in the answers and often omitted from web mentions of this feature -- if you're going to create function definitions, you probably will want a dedicated directory for them, and you have to tell zsh how to find that directory -- without clobbering the existing $FPATH value. (This is much like extending $PATH in most shells.) E.g. my .zshrc has this line: export FPATH=$HOME/dotfiles/zsh_functions:$FPATH Oct 30, 2020 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

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The autoload feature is not available in bash, but it is in ksh (korn shell) and zsh. On zsh see man zshbuiltins.

Functions are called in the same way as any other command. There can be a name conflict between a program and a function. What autoload does is to mark that name as being a function rather than an external program. The function has to be in a file on its own, with the filename the same as the function name.

autoload -Uz vcs_info

The -U means mark the function vcs_info for autoloading and suppress alias expansion. The -z means use zsh (rather than ksh) style. See also the functions command.

Edit (from comment, as suggested by @ijoseph):

So it records the fact that the name is a function and not an external program - it does not call it unless the -X option is used, it just affects the search path when it is called. If the function name does not collide with the name of a program then it is not required. Prefix your functions with something like f_ and you will probably never need it.

For more detail see http://zsh.sourceforge.net/Doc/Release/Functions.html.

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  • I've edited the question due to your answer. But I'm not able to get informations via man zshbuiltins, either. The following I get from zsh --version: zsh 5.0.2 (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu).
    – BairDev
    Jun 15, 2015 at 8:58
  • OK, I'm using 5.0.5 but on a MacBook. Did you try man zsh then search for autoload? Sorry if you already know this, but to do a search in a man page use the same mechanism as you would use in vim. For example, type: /autoload when you get the first page displayed. Type n for the next occurrence.
    – cdarke
    Jun 15, 2015 at 9:02
  • 1
    @malte: I just found this which explains the missing man pages: askubuntu.com/questions/399444/…
    – cdarke
    Jun 15, 2015 at 12:11
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    I still don't know what autoload actually does. Does it call a function? Is there any relationship to eval or source? Why would I use autoload -U compinit and not simple compinit? What does mark for autloading mean?
    – xeruf
    May 30, 2018 at 22:41
  • 3
    Above: "What autoload does is to mark that name as being a function rather than an external program.". So it records the fact that the name is a function and not an external program - it does not call it unless the -X option is used, it just affects the search path when it is called. If the function name does not collide with the name of a program then it is not required. Prefix your functions with something like f_ and you will probably never need it.
    – cdarke
    May 31, 2018 at 21:31
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autoload tells zsh to look for a file in $FPATH/$fpath containing a function definition, instead of a file in $PATH/$path containing an executable script or binary.

Script

A script is just a sequence of commands that get executed when the script is run. For example, suppose you have a file called hello like this:

echo "Setting 'greeting'"
greeting='Hello'

If the file is executable and located in one of the directories in your $PATH, then you can run it as a script by just typing its name. But scripts get their own copy of the shell process, so anything they do can't affect the calling shell environment. The assignment to greeting above will be in effect only within the script; once the script exits, it won't have had any impact on your interactive shell session:

$ hello
Setting 'greeting'
$ echo $greeting

$ 

Function

A function is instead defined once and stays in the shell's memory; when you call it, it executes inside the current shell, and can therefore have side effects:

hello() {
  echo "Setting 'greeting'"
  greeting='Hello'
}

$ hello
Setting 'greeting'
$ echo $greeting
Hello

So you use functions when you want to modify your shell environment. The Zsh Line Editor (ZLE) also uses functions - when you bind a key to some action, that action is defined as a shell function (which has to be added to ZLE with the zle -N command).

Now, if you have a lot of functions, then you might not want to define all of them in your .zshrc every time you start a new shell; that slows down shell startup and uses memory to store functions that you might not wind up calling during the lifetime of that shell. So you can instead put the function definitions into their own files, named after the functions they define, and put the files into directories in your $FPATH, which works like $PATH.
Zsh comes with a bunch of standard functions in the default $FPATH already. But it won't know to look for a command there unless you've first told it that the command is a function.

That's essentially what autoload does: it says "Hey, Zsh, this command name here is a function, so when I try to run it, go look for its definition in my FPATH, instead of looking for a command in my PATH."

Worth noting is that the first time you run an autoloaded function, Zsh sources the definition file, but – unlike ksh - it does not then call the function. It's up to you to call the function inside the file after defining it so that first invocation will work. An autoloadable definition of hello might look like this:

hello() {
  echo "Setting 'greeting'"
  greeting='Hello'
}
hello "$@"
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  • 9
    Such very useful explanation should be in the mainstream docs/guides because it really explains the "why" behind the features. IMHO every feature should have this purpose-oriented "why" in addition to the usage-oriented manual. Thanks a lot.
    – Giuseppe
    Jun 6, 2021 at 8:42

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