3

Let's say that I have a dataset on car sales, and I'm building components that display charts that show different aspect of that data.

One component could for example show the average selling price of cars by year, while another one could show how the amount of cylinders relates to mileage in cars bought last year.

These components could additionally be further parameterised, so that they show data only for cars bought in a given country, etc. It appears that using props to pass both the parameters and data seems appropriate, so that these components can be used like this:

<MileageByCylinder country="US" year="2014" dataset={data} />
<AvgSellingPricesByYear country="US"  dataset={data} />

So far, so good. Let's say however that I'm building two views (pages) that compose these components differently. The first one would be statically showing selling prices by year for different countries, while the other one would have an UI for choosing a country and also show mileage by cylinder. Both views need to somehow get the dataset that they pass to the chart components. But how can the logic for fetching the dataset be re-used?

With mixins, it can be done as follows:

var CarDataMixin = {

  componentDidMount: {
    // fetch car data and
    // call this.setState({carData: fetchedData}),
    // once data has been (asynchronously) fetched
  }

}

var FirstView = React.createClass({

  mixins: [CarDataMixin],

  render: function() {
    return (
        <div>
          <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="US"  dataset={this.state.carData} />
          <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="UK"  dataset={this.state.carData} />
          <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="FI"  dataset={this.state.carData} />
        </div>
      )
   }

})

var SecondView = React.createClass({

  mixins: [CarDataMixin],

  handleNewCountry: function(country) {
    this.state{country: country}
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
        <div>
          <CountryChooser onChange={this.handleNewCountry} />
          <MileageByCylinder country="{country}" year="2014" dataset={this.state.carData} />
          <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="{country}"  dataset={this.state.carData} />
        </div>
      )
   }

})

OK, nice. But a lot of people are advising not to use mixins, and that composition should be used instead. The only way to solve this using composition I have come up with is as follows:

  1. Make a root component that passes its state to children as props:

    var CarSalesRoot = React.createClass({
        componentDidMount: {
          // fetch car data and
          // call this.setState({carData: fetchedData}),
          // once data has been (asynchronously) fetched
        }
    
        renderChildren: function () {
            return React.Children.map(this.props.children, function (child) {
              return React.addons.cloneWithProps(child, {
                  carData: this.state.carData
              })
            }.bind(this))
        },
    
    
        render: function() {
          return <div>{this.renderChildren()}</div>
        } 
    });
    
  2. Create the view without the mixin:

    var FirstView = React.createClass({
        render: function() {
          return (
              <div>
                <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="US"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
                <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="UK"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
                <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="FI"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
              </div>
            )
         }
    });
    
  3. Create a wrapper component which wraps both the root component and the main view component:

    var FirstViewMain = React.createClass({
        render: function() {
          return (
              <CarSalesRoot>
                <FirstView />
              </CarSalesRoot>
            )
         }
    });
    

This feels a bit tricky, and makes data flows less explicit. I feel that this is something very basic and should be solvable in a clean way. Am I missing something obvious? Or is this actually an idiomatic and clean solution?

6

Another option for using composition is to create a "higher-order component," which is analogous to a higher-order function in functional programming, but really it is just a wrapper that is a slight variation on the code you presented.

  1. Define the higher-order component:

    var bindToCarData = function (Component) {
      return React.createClass({
        componentDidMount: {
          // fetch car data and
          // call this.setState({carData: fetchedData}),
          // once data has been (asynchronously) fetched
        },
    
        render: function() {
          return <Component carData={ this.state.carData } />
        }
      });
    });
    
  2. Then wrap your component when you define it.

    var FirstView = bindToCarData(React.createClass({
      render: function() {
        return (
            <div>
              <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="US"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
              <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="UK"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
              <AvgSellingPricesByYear country="FI"  dataset={this.props.carData} />
            </div>
          )
       }
    }));
    

This save you from writing the extra component (number 3 in your question), and it ties in the data flow logic directly in the component that needs the data.

You can pass additional parameters into the bindToCarData function if you need to.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank! This already looks better. This approach might be the way to go. – Juho Ojala Jun 15 '15 at 15:53
  • 2
    I would also recommend a ...this.props spread on the higher-order component's rendering of component, so that any props assigned to the wrapped version will still receive them. – max Jun 16 '15 at 10:57
  • Yes, max. This would in most cases be desirable. – Juho Ojala Jun 17 '15 at 13:31

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