1

Is it possible to determine whether a source file is being preprocessed due to an #include statement vs. being preprocessed due to it being a primary source file passed to the compiler?

Basically, I want to be able to write something like the following:

// foo.x:
#if COMPILING_FOO_MODULE
/* FOO code that's only visible when compiling foo.x module */
#endif
/* FOO code that's visible when compiling foo.x module or included in other modules */

// bar.cpp:
#include "foo.x"
...

When preprocessing foo.x, I want both sections of code to be passed on to the compiler, but when preprocessing bar.cpp, I only want the second section to be used:

// foo.x.preprocessed:
/* FOO code that's only visible when compiling foo.x module */
/* FOO code that's visible when compiling foo.x module or included in other modules */

// bar.cpp.preprocessed:
/* FOO code that's visible when compiling foo.x module or included in other modules */
...

I realize I could easily accomplish this by adding #define COMPILING_FOO_MODULE 0 just before the #include, but my goal is to avoid requiring any other code besides the #include to be added to the bar.cpp file.

Including both and since I assume the answer is the same for both.

EDIT:

To be clear, I understand that having a separate .h and .cpp file exactly solves this problem, and in almost all cases that's the right thing to do. But for various reasons I only want one source file that can be used as both the main module source file and the header file for other modules.

  • I think you can make use of #ifdef and #elsein your header file and have the definition #define in your source file where you include this header file. – Vinay Shukla Jun 16 '15 at 4:20
  • Can't you just #define HIDE_THE_FIRST_PART at the top of bar.cpp before #include "foo.x" and then ifdef the part you don't want to see away in foo.x? – user657267 Jun 16 '15 at 4:27
  • How about passing -DCOMPILING_FOO_MODULE=1 into the build just for foo.x? Would that be acceptable? – kaylum Jun 16 '15 at 4:27
  • There is no portable way. Some specific compilers will provide non-portable ways, like in @agamagarwal's answer – Ben Voigt Jun 16 '15 at 4:31
  • The error you are trying to solve is likely, that symbols are multiply defined. C++ has the inline keyword to prevent just that. – IInspectable Feb 12 '16 at 0:51
2

There is a way to do exactly what you want. Try this out:

foo.c

#if __INCLUDE_LEVEL__ == 0
/* FOO code that's only visible when compiling foo.x module */
#endif
/* FOO code that's visible when compiling foo.x module or included in other modules */

bar.c

#include <foo.c>
//other lines of code

Note that the macro __INCLUDE_LEVEL__ is predefined. It represents the depth of nesting in the include files.

I hope this helps.

Source: https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Common-Predefined-Macros.html

  • This looks like exactly what I'm looking for but unfortunately I'm using the Visual Studio compiler and this seems to be GCC-specific. – MooseBoys Jun 16 '15 at 4:33
0

The way this is traditionally done is to split foo.x into two files: foo.h and foo.c (or foo.cpp).

foo.h contains "FOO code that's visible when compiling foo.x module or included in other modules" and foo.c / foo.cpp contains "FOO code that's only visible when compiling foo.x module".

Inside foo.c / foo.cpp you #include "foo.h" so that it has both sets of code, and bar.cpp also has #include "foo.h".

  • 1
    Unfortunately that's exactly what led me to this problem in the first place - I'm trying to avoid the need for two separate files. I'll update the question to clarify. – MooseBoys Jun 16 '15 at 4:24
-1

Instead of

#define COMPILING_FOO_MODULE 0

in the files which aren't foo.cpp, use

#define COMPILING_FOO_MODULE 1

in foo.cpp and nothing in other compilation units.

#if works fine with undefined macros, and treats them as zero.

  • There is no foo.cpp, it's just foo.x which is both used as the module's main source file and #included by other modules. – MooseBoys Jun 16 '15 at 4:25
  • @MooseBoys: Well, pass -DCOMPILING_FOO_MODULE when compiling foo as a separate module. Or, make a foo.cpp with just #define COMPILING_FOO_MODULE 1 followed by #include "foo.x" – Ben Voigt Jun 16 '15 at 4:30

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