16

Two similar definitions in Java and C++, but totally different behaviour.

Java version:

class base{
    public void func1(){
        func2();
    }
    public void func2(){
        System.out.println(" I am in base:func2() \n");
    }

}

class derived extends base{
    public void func1(){
        super.func1();
    }
    public void func2(){
        System.out.println(" I am in derived:func2() \n");
    }
};
public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        derived d = new derived();
        d.func1();
    }
}

output:

I am in derived:func2()

C++ version:

#include <stdio.h>

class base
{
    public:
        void func1(){
            func2();
        }
        void func2(){
            printf(" I am in base:func2() \n");
        }
};

class derived : public base
{
    public:
        void func1(){
            base::func1();
        }
        void func2(){
            printf(" I am in derived:func2() \n");
        }
};

int main()
{
    derived *d = new derived();
    d->func1();
    return 0;
}

output:

I am in base:func2()

I don't know why they have different behaviour.

Even I know Java has auto polymorphism behaviour.

The Java output is hard to understand personally.

In my view, according to static scope, the base class function func1() should only be able to call the base class function func2(), as it knows nothing about the derived class at all. Otherwise the calling behaviour belongs to dynamic scope. Maybe in C++, func2() in base class is bind static, but in Java it is bind dynamic?

Member field is statically scoped.


The type inferring part is confusing. I thought this is converted to base type in the base::func1(). In C++, the base::func2() is not polymorphism, so the base::func1() is called. While in Java, base::func2() is polymorphism, so devried::func2() is called.

How the func2() class binding being inferred? Or Which fun2() should be called and how it is determined.

What happened behind base::func1()? Is there any cast here for this (from derive to base)? If no, how this is able to reach to the function in base class?

        void func1(){
            func2();
        }

Useful discussion on coderanch.

9
  • I am sorry, but it is the last part of my comment. I really want to know how the type inference is implemented when calling func2() from base::func1().
    – Kamel
    Jun 17, 2015 at 12:46
  • Do you mean How the func2() class binding being inferred?
    – aioobe
    Jun 17, 2015 at 12:47
  • Exactly. Which fun2() should be called and how it is determined.
    – Kamel
    Jun 17, 2015 at 12:48
  • Expanded my answer. Please let me know if it's still unclear.
    – aioobe
    Jun 17, 2015 at 12:57
  • Your expansion is great. But it would be more helpful if things behind base::func1() is explained.
    – Kamel
    Jun 17, 2015 at 13:07

2 Answers 2

23

In Java all methods that can be overridden are automatically virtual. There is no opt-in mechanism (virtual keyword) for it as it is in C++ (and there's no way to opt-out either).

Java behaves as if you had declared base::func2 as

virtual void func2(){
    printf(" I am in base:func2() \n");
}

In which case your program would have printed "I am in derived:func2()".

How the func2() class binding being inferred?
Which fun2() should be called and how it is determined.

For non-virtual methods (C++ methods without virtual modifier) it is the static type that determines which method to call. The static type of the variable is determined by the variable declaration and does not depend on how the code is executed.

For virtual methods (C++ methods with the virtual modifier and all Java methods) it is the runtime type that determines which method to call. The runtime type is the type of the actual object in runtime.

Example: If you have

Fruit f = new Banana();

the static type of f is Fruit and the runtime type of f is Banana.

If you do f.someNonVirtualMethod() the static type will be used and Fruit::someNonVirtualMethod will be called. If you do f.someVirtualMethod() the runtime type will be used and Banana::someVirtualMethod will be called.

The underlying implementation for how the compiler achieves this is basically implementation dependent, but typically a vtable is used. For details refer to


If no, how this is able to reach to the function in base class?

void func1(){
    func2();
}

If you're wondering why func2() here calls base's func2 it is because

A) You're in the scope of base which means that the static type of this is base, and

B) func2 in base is not virtual, so it is the static type that decides which implementation to call.

11
  • 1
    (And conversely, making a method final does let you "opt out"...) Jun 17, 2015 at 6:44
  • 1
    @LouisWasserman Yes and no. It is the decision of the base class to not let the sub classes override a method when it is final. You even cannot declare a method with the same signature. As far as I understand, that is somewhat different to C++. Jun 17, 2015 at 6:56
  • 1
    If a method can't be overridden it's meaningless to discuss whether it's virtual or not. I'd say private, final and static methods are neither virtual nor non-virtual because no one knows which method would be called if someone managed to override it.
    – aioobe
    Jun 17, 2015 at 6:59
  • But how to understand the base::func1() ? Does it mean to change the this from derived type to base type?
    – Kamel
    Jun 17, 2015 at 8:12
  • 1
    @aioobe: how do you define “non-virtual” then, if the absence of a virtual method call (actual runtime class based arbitration) does not suffice?
    – Holger
    Jun 17, 2015 at 13:18
0

In C++ you can only override a base class function if it is declared virtual. Since in your c++ example you haven't declared 'func2()' as virtual so it has not been overridden by derived class 'func2()`.

Whereas in Java you don't need to declare a function in the base class as virtual in order to override them.

Consider this Java example.

class Base{
  public void func2(){
    System.out.println("Base class func2()");
  }
}

class Derived extends Base{
  public void func2(){
    System.out.println("Derived class func2()");
  }
}

class Main extends Base{
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Derived derived = new Derived();
    derived.func2();

    Base base = new Derived();
    base.func2();
  }
}

Output

Derived class func2()
Derived class func2()

If you want to declare a base class function as non-virtual in java, then declare that function as final. This will prevent the override of base class function in the derived class.

Example:

class Base{
  public final void func2(){
    System.out.println("Base class func2()");
  }
}

Some external links belong to my site.

1
  • Based on the domain/URL of your link(s) being the same as, or containing, your user name, you appear to have linked to your own site/a site you're affiliated with. If you do, you must disclose that it's your site. If you don't disclose affiliation, it's considered spam. See: What signifies "Good" self promotion? and the help center on self-promotion. Disclosure must be explicit, but doesn't need to be formal. When it's your own personal content, it can just be something like "on my site…", "on my blog…", etc.
    – Makyen
    Oct 6, 2019 at 15:28

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