3

I am currently working on code that is using dynamic-linq, I ran into a problem when using a List<BaseClass>, where the list actually contains a list of the Person Class.

When I execute the following code I get a ParseException:

var list = new List<BaseClass>();

list.Add(new Person
{
  FirstName = "Joe",
  Surname   = "Bloggs"
});

list.Where("FirstName == @0", "Joe");

And the Exception:

enter image description here

Please see BaseClass below:

public class BaseClass 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

And the Person class:

public class Person : BaseClass
{
   public string FirstName { get; set; }
   public string Surname   { get; set; }
}

I can overcome the error by implementing the following code:

var list = new List<BaseClass>();

list.Add(new Person
{
  FirstName = "Joe",
  Surname   = "Bloggs"
});            

var newList = CreateListOfCorrectType<BaseClass>(list);
newList.Where("FirstName == @0", "Joe");

Please see CreateListOfCorrectType<T> method below:

private IList CreateListOfCorrectType<T>(
         List<T> list) 
{
  if (list.Count == 0)
  {
    return list;
  }

  var typeInfo = list.FirstOrDefault().GetType();

  var correctListType   = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(typeInfo.UnderlyingSystemType);
  var listOfCorrectType = (Activator.CreateInstance(correctListType)) as IList;

  list.ForEach(x => listOfCorrectType.Add(x));

  return listOfCorrectType;
}

My Question is if using the CreateListOfCorrectType is the best way of overcoming the issue? and if not what alternatives do I have in getting the List<BaseClass> to the correct Type.

I am looking to use this with existing code, and changing the existing List<>types are not possible. And the CreateListOfCorrectType method is not aware of the Person class.

Please note that class names and variables are for demonstrative purposes only.

UPDATE

Optimist's answer below leaded me to the solution for my issue, please see extension method used below:

public static IList ToDerivedListType(this IList list)
    {
        if (list == null || list.Count == 0) 
        {
            return list;
        }

        var type       = list.Cast<object>().FirstOrDefault().GetType();
        var castedList = typeof(Enumerable).GetMethod("Cast", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
                                           .MakeGenericMethod(type)
                                           .Invoke(null, new[] { list });

        return typeof(Enumerable).GetMethod("ToList", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
                                 .MakeGenericMethod(type)
                                 .Invoke(null, new[] { castedList }) as IList;           
    }

System.Linq.Enumerable.Cast and MakeGenericMethod was the key.

  • Try this: list.Select(b => Convert.ChangeType(b, b.GetType().UnderlyingSystemType)).Where(...) – cbr Jun 17 '15 at 14:18
  • @cubrr when trying your suggested code I get No property or field 'FirstName' exists in type 'Object' – Tjaart van der Walt Jun 17 '15 at 14:24
  • Ah, damn. Was worrh a try! – cbr Jun 17 '15 at 14:31
0

depending on the actual use cases, some things can be improved:

  • runtime expenses: the CreateListOfCorrectType function copies all elements into a new collection which results in unnecessary expense in case only a subset is taken out of the returned collection .
  • scope of applicability of the mapping function: this could be widened to work with IEnumerable.
  • finally, both the mapping and the filtering function can be combined into one to reduce the amount of code in consuming functions.

System.Linq.Enumerable.Cast and MakeGenericMethod can be employed to achieve that:

static public class Extension
{
    static public IEnumerable CastDynamic(this  IEnumerable Source, Type Type)
    {
        return
            (IEnumerable)
            typeof(Enumerable)
            .GetMethod("Cast", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Static | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public)
            .MakeGenericMethod(Type)
            .Invoke(null, new[] { Source });
    }

    static public IEnumerable CastToFirstType(this  IEnumerable Source)
    {
        if (0 == Source.Take(1).Count())
        {
            return Source;
        }

        return CastDynamic(Source, Source.Cast<object>().FirstOrDefault().GetType());
    }

    static public IEnumerable WhereCastToFirstType(this IEnumerable Source, string Predicate, params object[] values)
    {
        return Source.CastToFirstType().Where(Predicate, values);
    }
}

If tried to mimic the function you showed in terms of exceptions thrown. There is a difference because the casting is done after the mapping function returns.

| improve this answer | |
  • thanks @Optimist, System.Linq.Enumerable.Cast and MakeGenericMethod was the key. – Tjaart van der Walt Jun 23 '15 at 7:02
2

How about using the OfType linq method:

list.OfType<Person>().Where("FirstName == @0", "Joe");

See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb360913(v=vs.100).aspx

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the answer, but unfortunately the CreateListOfCorrectType is not aware of the type 'Person' so I have to get the type dynamically. – Tjaart van der Walt Jun 17 '15 at 14:10
  • I guess its not problem with the linq rather list.Add where he is adding a person to a List<BaseClass>. There wouldnt be a problem if it was declared like - List<BaseClass> list = new List<Person>();. I guess the OP doesnt want to declare it like that. Correct me if I am wrong @TjaartvanderWalt – Carbine Jun 17 '15 at 14:10
  • Oh I see, you don't know the type beforehand. – Daniel James Bryars Jun 17 '15 at 14:12
  • @CarbineCoder you are correct in saying I do not want to declare it like that as I have no control over the declaration of the list. – Tjaart van der Walt Jun 17 '15 at 14:16

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