12

I am concerned about references I have seen to Parse using JQuery-compatible promises, as I have read that jQuery promises allow consumers to mutate the state of the promise. Is it possible to use another promise implementation that is known to be Promises/A+ compliant (e.g. the ECMAScript 6 implementation, or Bluebird) with the Parse JavaScript SDK?

Normally I would assume that this isn’t possible, but in v1.4.2 of the Parse JavaScript SDK, the implementation of Parse.Promise defines the property “_isPromisesAPlusCompliant” as false which is then checked in various functions within the library.

N.B. This question was originally asked on the Parse Developers group, but received no responses.

  • 1
    I would love to help you but unfortunately I think the only people who can answer the question of whether or not other implementations are supported are Parse's programmers. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 17 '15 at 19:26
  • "jQuery promises allow consumers to mutate the state of the promise" - this bug has been fixed with jQuery 1.8 - 3 years ago! – Bergi Jun 27 '15 at 19:11
  • Are you looking for the Parse library methods returning promises of your custom implementation, or just asking about importing an arbitrary library in the Parse environment? – Bergi Jun 27 '15 at 19:13
  • @Bergi: The Parse library isn’t using jQuery’s promise implementation—it’s using its own custom promise implementation, which is what I don’t trust. I’m looking for a way to get the library to return anything that is known to be Promises/A+ compliant: it doesn’t have to be a library of my choosing, I just want to know that the promises I’m getting back will behave as expected without having to audit Parse’s code. – Jason Whittle Jun 30 '15 at 21:45
  • @JasonWhittle: Parse promises do behave as expected afaik. And until then, they still are valid A+ thenables that can be assimilated by the promise implementation of your choice. – Bergi Jun 30 '15 at 21:47
5

I am concerned that Parse uses jQuery-compatible promises, as I have read that jQuery promises allow consumers to mutate the state of the promise.

You don't need to be concerned. "jQuery-compatible" can mean a lot of things, and Parse promises do certainly not allow consumers to mutate their state1 (as jQuery doesn't do either since years now). Btw, they're A+ "compatible" as well :-)

1: through the public methods. So not more than most other implementations, that is.

Is it possible to use another promise implementation that is known to be Promises/A+ compliant with the Parse JavaScript SDK?

Yes. The Parse SDK does return valid A+ thenables, which means that you can return Parse promises from then callbacks of your favourite promise implementation and expect it to work flawlessly:

myCompliantPromise.then(function(res) {
    return parse_query.get(…);
}).then(…)

You can also cast them into valid promises of your implementation by using Promise.resolve, for example:

Promise.resolve(parse_query.get(…)).then(…);

Normally I would assume that this isn’t possible, but in v1.4.2 of the Parse JavaScript SDK, the implementation of Parse.Promise defines the property _isPromisesAPlusCompliant as false which is then checked in various functions within the library.

He! Although it is unfortunately undocumented, this flag does actually allow you to make the native Parse.com promise library A+ compliant in your app:

Parse.Promise._isPromisesAPlusCompliant = true;

Update: In newer versions, this is not exposed as an underscored property, but rather you have to call the (undocumented) Parse.Promise.enableAPlusCompliant() method. For details see issue #57.

I've reviewed the code, and this flag basically changes 3 things:

  • Exceptions in then callbacks are caught and lead to the rejection of the result promise, instead of a global error. So you can use throw in them.
  • If you return a value from the onRejected callback (second parameter to then), the error is supposed to be handled and the result promise is fulfilled instead of being rejected.
  • All then callbacks are executed asynchronously.

These are indeed solving exactly the problems inherent to the jQuery Deferred implementation at the current time.

I'll assume that Parse are planning to silently migrate this true setting to become the default, and are testing whether it breaks anything for the users. I'd guess that it is pretty safe to use even if undocumented yet.

I'd like to make all Parse APIs return promises of my custom library.

That's not so simple, although it can be done. There are basically two approaches:

  • decorate all promise-returning methods in the API by composing them with Promise.resolve, which is basically what @dancamper suggested
  • overwriting Parse.Promise with a wrapper around your library.

The second seems to be more efficient and stable, it's more maintainable as it doesn't require tweaking when Parse change their API.

Parse.Promise = (function(oldPromise, Promise) {
    function promise() {
        var res, rej;
        var p = new Promise(function(_res, _rej) {
            res = _res;
            rej = _rej;
        });
        p.resolve = res;
        p.reject = rej;
        return p;
    }
    promise.is = oldPromise.is;
    promise.as = Promise.resolve;
    promise.error = Promise.reject;
    promise.when = Promise.all; // ²
    promise._continueWhile = oldPromise._continueWhile;
    Promise.prototype._continueWith = oldPromise.prototype._continueWith;
    Promise.prototype._thenRunCallback = oldPromise.prototype._thenRunCallback;

    // you might not need / want these ³
    Promise.prototype.always = oldPromise.prototype.always;
    Promise.prototype.done = oldPromise.prototype.done; 
    Promise.prototype.fail = oldPromise.prototype.fail;

    return promise;
}(Parse.Promise, require("Bluebird"))); // or whatever

2: Promise.all resolves to an array, while Parse.Promise.when resolves with multiple arguments (see below). You may want / need to preserve this and use promise.when = oldPromise.when; instead.
3: Make sure not to overwrite methods of your custom library here. Parse doesn't need these methods, they're for jQuery compatibility.

Notice that Parse does, like jQuery, sometimes resolve its promises with multiple values, e.g. in Parse._ajax. It doesn't rely on this feature internally, but you should check how your favourite promise library copes with them.

  • 1
    "I'll assume that Parse are planning to silently migrate this true setting to become the default": this is indeed the case, cf. github.com/ParsePlatform/Parse-SDK-JS/issues/57 – Lane Rettig Jan 19 '16 at 0:19
  • @LaneRettig: Thanks for the confirmation :-) – Bergi Jan 19 '16 at 1:19
  • The code snippet is missing a ) at the end! – fatuhoku Jan 31 '16 at 22:24
  • How are you actually supposed to require this snippet of code? It says that Parse is not defined... – fatuhoku Jan 31 '16 at 22:26
  • @fatuhoku: That depends on your environment (node etc). The code just expects to get the Parse.Promise object in the first and the constructor of the replacement library in the second argument. – Bergi Jan 31 '16 at 23:37
5
+25

You can use native Promises, or a good polyfill. You can encapsulate any thenable (a Promise-like object with a public then method) in Promise.resolve call, like this:

var promise = Promise.resolve($.getJSON("/something.json"));

This will also have a then method, but without any headaches. It should still work.

3

One option is to modify the Parse SDK prototypes to return a different type of Promise.

A good starting point is this library https://github.com/brandid/parse-angular-patch/blob/master/src/parse-angular.js which patches the Parse prototypes to return AngularJS promises

            // Keep a handy local reference
            var Parse = $window.Parse;

            //-------------------------------------
            // Structured object of what we need to update
            //-------------------------------------

            var methodsToUpdate = {
                "Object": {
                    prototype: ['save', 'fetch', 'destroy'],
                    static: ['saveAll', 'destroyAll']
                },
                "Collection": {
                    prototype: ['fetch'],
                    static: []
                },
                "Query": {
                    prototype: ['find', 'first', 'count', 'get'],
                    static: []
                },
                "Cloud": {
                    prototype: [],
                    static: ['run']
                },
                "User": {
                    prototype: ['signUp'],
                    static: ['requestPasswordReset', 'logIn']
                },
                "FacebookUtils": {
                    prototype: [],
                    static: ['logIn', 'link', 'unlink']
                },
                "Config": {
                    prototype: [],
                    static: ['get']
                }
            };

            //// Let's loop over Parse objects
            for (var k in methodsToUpdate) {

                var currentClass = k;
                var currentObject = methodsToUpdate[k];

                var currentProtoMethods = currentObject.prototype;
                var currentStaticMethods = currentObject.static;


                /// Patching prototypes
                currentProtoMethods.forEach(function(method){

                    var origMethod = Parse[currentClass].prototype[method];

                    // Overwrite original function by wrapping it with $q
                    Parse[currentClass].prototype[method] = function() {

                        return origMethod.apply(this, arguments)
                        .then(function(data){
                            var defer = $q.defer();
                            defer.resolve(data);
                            return defer.promise;
                        }, function(err){
                            var defer = $q.defer();
                            defer.reject(err);
                            return defer.promise;
                        });


                    };

                });


                ///Patching static methods too
                currentStaticMethods.forEach(function(method){

                    var origMethod = Parse[currentClass][method];

                    // Overwrite original function by wrapping it with $q
                    Parse[currentClass][method] = function() {

                        return origMethod.apply(this, arguments)
                        .then(function(data){
                            var defer = $q.defer();
                            defer.resolve(data);
                            return defer.promise;
                        }, function(err){
                            var defer = $q.defer();
                            defer.reject(err);
                            return defer.promise;
                        });

                    };

                });


            }

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