398

When I ask the model manager to get an object, it raises DoesNotExist when there is no matching object.

go = Content.objects.get(name="baby")

Instead of DoesNotExist, how can I have go be None instead?

24 Answers 24

526

There is no 'built in' way to do this. Django will raise the DoesNotExist exception every time. The idiomatic way to handle this in python is to wrap it in a try catch:

try:
    go = SomeModel.objects.get(foo='bar')
except SomeModel.DoesNotExist:
    go = None

What I did do, is to subclass models.Manager, create a safe_get like the code above and use that manager for my models. That way you can write: SomeModel.objects.safe_get(foo='bar').

14
  • 10
    Nice use of SomeModel.DoesNotExist instead of importing the exception, too.
    – supermitch
    Mar 31, 2014 at 18:37
  • 308
    This solution is four lines long. For me this is too much. With django 1.6 you can use SomeModel.objects.filter(foo='bar').first() this returns the first match, or None. It does not fail if there are several instances like queryset.get()
    – guettli
    Apr 14, 2014 at 13:21
  • 32
    I think it is bad style to overuse exceptions for handling default cases. Yes, "it is easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission". But an exception should still be used, in my eyes, for exceptions. Apr 28, 2015 at 20:57
  • 12
    Explicit is better than implicit. Unless there's a performance reason to use filter().first() I think the exception is the way to go. Aug 5, 2016 at 20:39
  • 12
    Using first() is only a good idea if you don't care when there are multiples. Otherwise, this solution is superior, because it will still throw an Exception if you unexpectedly find multiple objects, which is normally what you would want to happen in that case.
    – rossdavidh
    Mar 19, 2018 at 16:10
329

Since django 1.6 you can use first() method like so:

Content.objects.filter(name="baby").first()
10
  • 57
    In this case, no Error is raised if there is more than one match. Apr 28, 2015 at 20:54
  • 9
    'FeroxTL' you need to credit @guettli for this answer, as he commented this on the accepted answer a year prior to your post.
    – colm.anseo
    May 12, 2016 at 14:15
  • 10
    @colminator I'd rather say guettli should learn that a new answer does not belong as a comment if he wants to raise his stackoverflow reputaiton :) FeroxTL should get points for making something hidden as a comment more clear as an answer. Your comment is credit enough for guettli I think and should not be added to the answer if that was your suggestion.
    – Joakim
    Sep 23, 2016 at 13:21
  • 4
    @Joakim I have no problem with posting a new "answer" - just to give credit where it is due :-)
    – colm.anseo
    Oct 4, 2016 at 14:39
  • 5
    What about performance of this approach comparing to accepted answer?
    – MaxCore
    Jun 26, 2018 at 12:03
61

You can create a generic function for this.

def get_or_none(classmodel, **kwargs):
    try:
        return classmodel.objects.get(**kwargs)
    except classmodel.DoesNotExist:
        return None

Use this like below:

go = get_or_none(Content,name="baby")

go will be None if no entry matches else will return the Content entry.

Note:It will raises exception MultipleObjectsReturned if more than one entry returned for name="baby".

You should handle it on the data model to avoid this kind of error but you may prefer to log it at run time like this:

def get_or_none(classmodel, **kwargs):
    try:
        return classmodel.objects.get(**kwargs)
    except classmodel.MultipleObjectsReturned as e:
        print('ERR====>', e)

    except classmodel.DoesNotExist:
        return None
1
  • Great! if it is a client side error: from django.shortcuts import get_object_or_404 else it is a server side problem so get_or_none is the best.
    – F.Tamy
    Sep 2, 2020 at 10:29
52

From django docs

get() raises a DoesNotExist exception if an object is not found for the given parameters. This exception is also an attribute of the model class. The DoesNotExist exception inherits from django.core.exceptions.ObjectDoesNotExist

You can catch the exception and assign None to go.

from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist
try:
    go  = Content.objects.get(name="baby")
except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    go = None
28

You can do it this way:

go  = Content.objects.filter(name="baby").first()

Now go variable could be either the object you want or None

Ref: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/1.8/ref/models/querysets/#django.db.models.query.QuerySet.first

1
  • 2
    But... This is the same answer as above by @FeroxTL
    – Peter K
    Aug 23, 2023 at 18:03
24

To make things easier, here is a snippet of the code I wrote, based on inputs from the wonderful replies here:

class MyManager(models.Manager):

    def get_or_none(self, **kwargs):
        try:
            return self.get(**kwargs)
        except ObjectDoesNotExist:
            return None

And then in your model:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    objects = MyManager()

That's it. Now you have MyModel.objects.get() as well as MyModel.objetcs.get_or_none()

2
  • 7
    also, don't forget to import: from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist Jul 22, 2014 at 13:07
  • 1
    Or except self.model.DoesNotExist to avoid the import.
    – rsanden
    Nov 14, 2020 at 11:50
19

you could use exists with a filter:

Content.objects.filter(name="baby").exists()
#returns False or True depending on if there is anything in the QS

just an alternative for if you only want to know if it exists

3
  • 4
    That would cause an extra database call when exists. Not a good idea Nov 25, 2015 at 16:36
  • @Christoffer not sure why would that be an extra db call. As per the docs: Note: If you only want to determine if at least one result exists (and don’t need the actual objects), it’s more efficient to use exists().
    – Anupam
    May 1, 2018 at 9:03
  • 3
    @Christoffer I think you are right. I now read the question again and the OP actually wants the actual object to be returned. So exists() will be used with if clause before fetching the object hence causing a double hit to the db. I'll still keep the comment around in case it helps someone else.
    – Anupam
    May 1, 2018 at 9:07
11

It's one of those annoying functions that you might not want to re-implement:

from annoying.functions import get_object_or_None
#...
user = get_object_or_None(Content, name="baby")
1
  • 1
    I checked the code of get_object_or_None but found that it still raise MultipleObjectsReturned if more than one object. So, user might consider surrounding with a try-except (which the function itself has a try-except already).
    – John Pang
    Jan 23, 2019 at 16:56
9

Maybe is better you use:

User.objects.filter(username=admin_username).exists()
1
  • 2
    The problem with this is if the User is deleted between this line and the line where it's actually retrieved.
    – Neil
    Sep 26, 2021 at 11:51
7

Handling exceptions at different points in your views could really be cumbersome..What about defining a custom Model Manager, in the models.py file, like

class ContentManager(model.Manager):
    def get_nicely(self, **kwargs):
        try:
            return self.get(kwargs)
        except(KeyError, Content.DoesNotExist):
            return None

and then including it in the content Model class

class Content(model.Model):
    ...
    objects = ContentManager()

In this way it can be easily dealt in the views i.e.

post = Content.objects.get_nicely(pk = 1)
if post:
    # Do something
else:
    # This post doesn't exist
1
  • 1
    I really like this solution, but wasn't able to get it to work as is when using python 3.6. Wanted to leave a note that modifying the return in the ContentManager to return self.get(**kwargs) got it to work for me. Not to say anything's wrong with the answer, just a tip for anyone trying to use it with later versions (or with whatever else kept it from working for me).
    – skagzilla
    Oct 4, 2017 at 15:10
6

I think it isn't bad idea to use get_object_or_404()

from django.shortcuts import get_object_or_404

def my_view(request):
    my_object = get_object_or_404(MyModel, pk=1)

This example is equivalent to:

from django.http import Http404

def my_view(request):
    try:
        my_object = MyModel.objects.get(pk=1)
    except MyModel.DoesNotExist:
        raise Http404("No MyModel matches the given query.")

You can read more about get_object_or_404() in django online documentation.

5

If you want a simple one-line solution that doesn't involve exception handling, conditional statements or a requirement of Django 1.6+, do this instead:

x = next(iter(SomeModel.objects.filter(foo='bar')), None)
3

From django 1.7 onwards you can do like:

class MyQuerySet(models.QuerySet):

    def get_or_none(self, **kwargs):
        try:
            return self.get(**kwargs)
        except self.model.DoesNotExist:
            return None


class MyBaseModel(models.Model):

    objects = MyQuerySet.as_manager()


class MyModel(MyBaseModel):
    ...

class AnotherMyModel(MyBaseModel):
    ...

The advantage of "MyQuerySet.as_manager()" is that both of the following will work:

MyModel.objects.filter(...).get_or_none()
MyModel.objects.get_or_none()
1
  • Sometimes, the best answers are not the most upvoted ;) Nov 2, 2022 at 12:15
3

I use Django 2.2.16. And this is how I solve this problem:

from typing import Any

from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist
from django.db import models
from django.db.models.base import ModelBase
from django.db.models.manager import Manager


class SManager(Manager):
    def get_if_exist(self, *args: Any, **kwargs: Any):
        try:
            return self.get(*args, **kwargs)
        except ObjectDoesNotExist:
            return None


class SModelBase(ModelBase):
    def _prepare(cls):
        manager = SManager()
        manager.auto_created = True
        cls.add_to_class("objects", manager)

        super()._prepare()

    class Meta:
        abstract = True


class SModel(models.Model, metaclass=SModelBase):
    managers = False

    class Meta:
        abstract = True

And after that, in every models, you just need to import in:

from custom.models import SModel


class SUser(SModel):
    pass

And in views, you can call like this:

SUser.objects.get_if_exist(id=1)
2

This is a copycat from Django's get_object_or_404 except that the method returns None. This is extremely useful when we have to use only() query to retreive certain fields only. This method can accept a model or a queryset.

from django.shortcuts import _get_queryset


def get_object_or_none(klass, *args, **kwargs):
    """
    Use get() to return an object, or return None if object
    does not exist.
    klass may be a Model, Manager, or QuerySet object. All other passed
    arguments and keyword arguments are used in the get() query.
    Like with QuerySet.get(), MultipleObjectsReturned is raised if more than
    one object is found.
    """
    queryset = _get_queryset(klass)
    if not hasattr(queryset, 'get'):
        klass__name = klass.__name__ if isinstance(klass, type) else klass.__class__.__name__
        raise ValueError(
            "First argument to get_object_or_none() must be a Model, Manager, "
            "or QuerySet, not '%s'." % klass__name
        )
    try:
        return queryset.get(*args, **kwargs)
    except queryset.model.DoesNotExist:
        return None
1

Here's a variation on the helper function that allows you to optionally pass in a QuerySet instance, in case you want to get the unique object (if present) from a queryset other than the model's all objects queryset (e.g. from a subset of child items belonging to a parent instance):

def get_unique_or_none(model, queryset=None, **kwargs):
    """
        Performs the query on the specified `queryset`
        (defaulting to the `all` queryset of the `model`'s default manager)
        and returns the unique object matching the given
        keyword arguments.  Returns `None` if no match is found.
        Throws a `model.MultipleObjectsReturned` exception
        if more than one match is found.
    """
    if queryset is None:
        queryset = model.objects.all()
    try:
        return queryset.get(**kwargs)
    except model.DoesNotExist:
        return None

This can be used in two ways, e.g.:

  1. obj = get_unique_or_none(Model, **kwargs) as previosuly discussed
  2. obj = get_unique_or_none(Model, parent.children, **kwargs)
0
1

Without exception:

if SomeModel.objects.filter(foo='bar').exists():
    x = SomeModel.objects.get(foo='bar')
else:
    x = None

Using an exception:

try:
   x = SomeModel.objects.get(foo='bar')
except SomeModel.DoesNotExist:
   x = None

There is a bit of an argument about when one should use an exception in python. On the one hand, "it is easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission". While I agree with this, I believe that an exception should remain, well, the exception, and the "ideal case" should run without hitting one.

1

We can use Django builtin exception which attached to the models named as .DoesNotExist. So, we don't have to import ObjectDoesNotExist exception.

Instead doing:

from django.core.exceptions import ObjectDoesNotExist

try:
    content = Content.objects.get(name="baby")
except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    content = None

We can do this:

try:
    content = Content.objects.get(name="baby")
except Content.DoesNotExist:
    content = None
1

I was facing with the same problem too. It's hard to write and read try-except for each time when you want to get an element from your model as in @Arthur Debert's answer. So, my solution is to create an Getter class which is inherited by the models:

class Getter:
    @classmethod
    def try_to_get(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        try:
            return cls.objects.get(**kwargs)
        except Exception as e:
            return None

class MyActualModel(models.Model, Getter):
    pk_id = models.AutoField(primary_key=True)
    ...

In this way, I can get the actual element of MyActualModel or None:

MyActualModel.try_to_get(pk_id=1)
1

Simple way:

if query.exists(): do something....

or

if query.exists() is False: do something...

0

I prefer this method without using exceptions. It also handles multiple objects as well as no objects.

go_list = Content.objects.filter(name="baby")
if (len(go_list) == 1):
    go = go_list[0]
else:
    go = None # optionally do other things if there are multiple objects / no objects.
0

What if something like this?

go = (Content.objects.filter(name="value") or [None])[0]
0

As it has been mentioned in other answers, you can use

filter(**kwargs).first()

The issue with this method is it never throws a MultipleObjectsReturned error if the query returns multiple objects. This may not always be desirable. Assume you have the following database table

id first_name last_name
1 Keenen Wayans
2 Marlon Wayans
3 Shawn Wayans

Person.objects.filter(last_name="Wayans").first()

will always return Keenen Wayans. The user will never know there are other 'Wayans'

If you don't like this, below is my reimplementation of Django's shortcut method get_object_or_404. If no object is found, it returns None, but if the query returns multiple objects, it throws a MultipleObjectsReturned exception. I would rather handle MultipleObjectsReturned exception, instead of returning a bogus value to the user.

In a separate file called shortcuts.py, create a method called get_object_or_none.

def get_object_or_none(klass, *args, **kwargs):
    """
    Use get() to return an object, or returns None if the object
    does not exist instead of throwing an exception.
    klass may be a Model, Manager, or QuerySet object. All other passed
    arguments and keyword arguments are used in the get() query.
    Like with QuerySet.get(), MultipleObjectsReturned is raised if more than
    one object is found.
    """
    queryset =  klass._default_manager.all() if hasattr(klass, "_default_manager") else klass
    if not hasattr(queryset, "get"):
        klass__name = (
            klass.__name__ if isinstance(klass, type) else klass.__class__.__name__
        )
        raise ValueError(
            "First argument to get_object_or_none() must be a Model, Manager, "
            "or QuerySet, not '%s'." % klass__name
        )
    try:
        return queryset.get(*args, **kwargs)
    except queryset.model.DoesNotExist:
        return None

Then in views.py

from myapp.shortcuts import get_object_or_none

person = get_object_or_none(Person, first_name='Shawn', last_name='Wayans')
#person is 'Shawn Wayans'

person = get_object_or_none(Person, last_name='Hendrix')
#person is None as database has no person with last name 'Hendrix'

person = get_object_or_none(Person, last_name='Wayans')
#throws 'MultipleObjectsReturned' error since multiple persons returned.
-2

How about a slice? It will parse to a limit 1.

go = Content.objects.filter(name="baby")[0]
1
  • Being sarcastic, is not aligned with SO best practices. Reporting.
    – ivanleoncz
    Aug 7, 2023 at 18:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.