How can I pass a unique_ptr into a function? Lets say I have the following class:

class A
{
public:
    A(int val)
    {
        _val = val;
    }

    int GetVal() { return _val; }
private:
    int _val;
};

The following does not compile:

void MyFunc(unique_ptr<A> arg)
{
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    unique_ptr<A> ptr = unique_ptr<A>(new A(1234));
    MyFunc(ptr);

    return 0;
}

Why can I not pass a unique_ptr into a function? Surely this is the primary purpose of the construct? Or did the C++ committee intend for me to fall back to raw C-style pointers and pass it like this:

MyFunc(&(*ptr)); 

And most strangely of all, why is this an OK way of passing it? It seems horribly inconsistent:

MyFunc(unique_ptr<A>(new A(1234)));
  • 3
    There is nothing wrong with "falling back" to raw C-style pointers as long as they are non-owning raw pointers. You might prefer to write 'ptr.get()'. Although, if you don't need nullability a reference would be preferred. – Chris Drew Jun 18 '15 at 4:51
up vote 34 down vote accepted

There's basically two options here:

Pass the smart pointer by reference

void MyFunc(unique_ptr<A> & arg)
{
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    unique_ptr<A> ptr = unique_ptr<A>(new A(1234));
    MyFunc(ptr);
}

Move the smart pointer into the function argument

Note that in this case, the assertion will hold!

void MyFunc(unique_ptr<A> arg)
{
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    unique_ptr<A> ptr = unique_ptr<A>(new A(1234));
    MyFunc(move(ptr));
    assert(ptr == nullptr)
}
  • @VermillionAzure: The feature you are referring to is normally called noncopyable, not unique. – Bill Lynch Jun 18 '15 at 2:35
  • Thanks. In this case I wanted to create an instance, perform some actions on it and then pass off ownership to someone else, which move() seems perfect for. – user3690202 Jun 18 '15 at 2:42
  • 3
    You should only pass a unique_ptr by reference if the function might or might-not move from it. And then it should be an rvalue reference. To observe an object without requiring anything about its ownership semantics, use a reference like A const& or A&. – Potatoswatter Jun 18 '15 at 3:56
  • 4
    Listen to Herb Sutters talk on CppCon 2014. He strongly discourages, to pass references to unique_ptr<> . The essence is, that you should just use smart pointers like unique_ptr<> or shared_ptr<> when you deal with ownership. See www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnqTKD8uD64 Here you can find the slides github.com/CppCon/CppCon2014/tree/master/Presentations/… – schorsch_76 Jun 18 '15 at 5:43
  • 1
    @Furihr: It's just a way of showing what the value of ptr is after the move. – Bill Lynch Jun 18 '15 at 14:35

You're passing it by value, which implies making a copy. That wouldn't be very unique, would it?

You could move the value, but that implies passing ownership of the object and control of its lifetime to the function.

If the lifetime of the object is guaranteed to exist over the lifetime of the call to MyFunc, just pass a raw pointer via ptr.get().

Why can I not pass a unique_ptr into a function?

You cannot do that because unique_ptr has a move constructor but not a copy constructor. According to the standard, when a move constructor is defined but a copy constructor is not defined, the copy constructor is deleted.

12.8 Copying and moving class objects

...

7 If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy constructor, one is declared implicitly. If the class definition declares a move constructor or move assignment operator, the implicitly declared copy constructor is defined as deleted;

You can pass the unique_ptr to the function by using:

void MyFunc(std::unique_ptr<A>& arg)
{
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

and use it like you have:

or

void MyFunc(std::unique_ptr<A> arg)
{
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

and use it like:

std::unique_ptr<A> ptr = std::unique_ptr<A>(new A(1234));
MyFunc(std::move(ptr));

Important Note

Please note that if you use the second method, ptr does not have ownership of the pointer after the call to std::move(ptr) returns.

void MyFunc(std::unique_ptr<A>&& arg) would have the same effect as void MyFunc(std::unique_ptr<A>& arg) since both are references.

In the first case, ptr still has ownership of the pointer after the call to MyFunc.

Why can I not pass a unique_ptr into a function?

You can, but not by copy - because std::unique_ptr<> is not copy-constructible.

Surely this is the primary purpose of the construct?

Among other things, std::unique_ptr<> is designed to unequivocally mark unique ownership (as opposed to std::shared_ptr<> ).

And most strangely of all, why is this an OK way of passing it?

Because in that case, there is no copy-construction.

  • Thanks for your answer. Just out of interest, can you explain why the last way of passing it isn't using the copy constructor? I would have thought that the use of the unique_ptr's constructor would generate an instance on the stack, which would be copied into the arguments for MyFunc() using the copy constructor? Though I admit my recollection is a little vague in this area. – user3690202 Jun 18 '15 at 2:47
  • As it is an rvalue, the move-constructor is called instead. Though your compiler will certainly optimize this out anyway. – Nielk Jun 18 '15 at 2:53

As MyFunc doesn't take ownership, it would be better to have:

void MyFunc(const A* arg)
{
    assert(arg != nullptr); // or throw ?
    cout << arg->GetVal() << endl;
}

or better

void MyFunc(const A& arg)
{
    cout << arg.GetVal() << endl;
}

If you really want to take ownership, you have to move your resource:

std::unique_ptr<A> ptr = std::make_unique<A>(1234);
MyFunc(std::move(ptr));

or pass directly a r-value reference:

MyFunc(std::make_unique<A>(1234));

std::unique_ptr doesn't have copy on purpose to guaranty to have only one owner.

  • This answer is missing what the call to MyFunc looks like for your first two cases. Not sure if you're using ptr.get() or just passing the ptr into the function? – taylorstine May 31 at 19:03

Since unique_ptr is for unique ownership, if you want to pass it as argument try

MyFunc(move(ptr));

But after that the state of ptr in main will be nullptr.

  • 2
    "will be undefined" - no, it will be null, or unique_ptr would be rather useless. – T.C. Jun 18 '15 at 2:37

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