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I want to use expression trees to dynamically create a method to call a lambda. The following code runs fine for the first call to the ComposeLambda function, but the second call fails with the following error message.

Incorrect number of arguments supplied for call to method 'Int32 lambda_method(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Closure, Int32)'

{
    Func<int, int> innerLambda = i => i + 1;    
    var composedLambda = ComposeLambda(innerLambda);
    Console.WriteLine(composedLambda.DynamicInvoke(0));
    var composedLambda2 = ComposeLambda(composedLambda);
    Console.WriteLine(composedLambda2.DynamicInvoke(0));
}

private static Delegate ComposeLambda(Delegate innerLambda)
{
    Func<int, int> outerLambda = i => i + 2;
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (int));
    var callInner = Expression.Call(innerLambda.GetMethodInfo(), parameter);
    var callOuter = Expression.Call(outerLambda.GetMethodInfo(), callInner);
    var composedLambdaType = typeof (Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeof (int), typeof (int));
    var composedLambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(composedLambdaType, callOuter, parameter);
    var composedLambda = composedLambdaExpression.Compile();
    return composedLambda;
}

How can I get and pass on this closure object?

4
  • 1
    @jp2code It's in 4.5: GetMethodInfo – James Thorpe Jun 18 '15 at 13:36
  • Don't use Expression.Call(innerLambda.GetMethodInfo(), ...), that's just asking for trouble. Invoke the delegate instead - you have no business messing around with the delegate's "method" - not only do you lose the target (quite important in instance methods), but you're also violating privacy (anonymous methods are internal or private, for example). And in this case, you didn't pass the closure parameter to the method :) – Luaan Jun 18 '15 at 13:36
  • @Luaan expression trees are to mess around with low-level stuff - that is what they are there for – Philipp Kramer Jun 18 '15 at 13:41
  • Well, obviously you don't know your "low-level" stuff :) See my answer. – Luaan Jun 18 '15 at 13:41
11

Don't use Expression.Call(innerLambda.GetMethodInfo(), ...), that's just asking for trouble. Invoke the delegate instead - you have no business messing around with the delegate's "method" - not only do you lose the target (quite important in instance methods), but you're also violating privacy (anonymous methods are internal or private, for example).

And in this case, you didn't pass the closure parameter to the method :) This should be rather obvious from the error message - it shows you the signature of the actual method (which includes the closure).

If you use Expression.Invoke (as you should with delegates), it works as expected:

void Main()
{
    Func<int, int> innerLambda = i => i + 1;    
    var composedLambda = ComposeLambda(innerLambda);
    Console.WriteLine(composedLambda.DynamicInvoke(0));
    var composedLambda2 = ComposeLambda(composedLambda);
    Console.WriteLine(composedLambda2.DynamicInvoke(0));
}

private static Delegate ComposeLambda(Delegate innerLambda)
{
    Func<int, int> outerLambda = i => i + 2;
    var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (int));

    var callInner = Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(innerLambda), parameter);
    var callOuter = Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(outerLambda), callInner);
    var composedLambdaType = typeof (Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeof (int), typeof (int));
    var composedLambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(composedLambdaType, callOuter, parameter);
    var composedLambda = composedLambdaExpression.Compile();
    return composedLambda;
}

In addition to this, if you know the proper delegate type at compile-time, don't use Delegate. In this case, it's pretty trivial to use Func<int, int>, which you can then invoke as composedLambda2(0), for example:

private static Func<int, int> ComposeLambda(Func<int, int> innerLambda)
{
  Func<int, int> outerLambda = i => i + 2;
  var parameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof (int));

  var callInner = Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(innerLambda), parameter);
  var callOuter = Expression.Invoke(Expression.Constant(outerLambda), callInner);

  var composedLambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<int, int>>(callOuter, parameter);
  return composedLambdaExpression.Compile();
}
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    Where would be a good place to go to ...understand what this is doing, what it is for, and what it is called? It is just blowing me away over here. – jp2code Jun 18 '15 at 13:45
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    @jp2code I don't know about any nice explanation or a tutorial. Those are called "expression trees" - basic intro on MSDN is at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397951.aspx. Try blogs.msdn.com/b/charlie/archive/2008/01/31/… as well, for some explanation and examples. – Luaan Jun 18 '15 at 13:50
  • @Luaan thanks that is a great help. Of course, I would not use expression trees, if I would not be forced; and of course I am always as specific as possible with the types. But if one writes very generic pieces of code, that is what happens in the worst case. – Philipp Kramer Jun 18 '15 at 14:11
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    @EmperorOrionii Expression.Constant works fine for anything that behaves as a constant value - that is, no dependencies on other parts of the expression, and ideally, immutable. It does work with mutable values as well, but make sure you know what you're doing - most of these features are designed in a functional mindset, with immutability being the default. Of course, all of this is only true if the Expression is compiled - if you use the Expression for something else (e.g. Entity Framework), you need to look up the specific limitations etc. of the consumer. – Luaan Sep 2 '20 at 5:41
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    @EmperorOrionii It's no hard rule; even though the expression is named Constant, what it really means is "this is passed by reference". The reference is baked into the expression (and the delegate if you compile the expression tree). Of course, value types are copied (unless you reuse the boxed value). I just tend to treat anything mutable outside of a scope of a function with a healthy dose of suspicion nowadays :) – Luaan Sep 3 '20 at 11:27

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