19

Is there a more effective way to return true if n is a power of two or false if not?

function isPowerOfTwo(n) {
  return Math.pow(2, Math.round(Math.log(n) / Math.log(2)));
}
5
  • So far, I have been able to convert a number to a valid power of two number here: jsfiddle.net/marcusdei/b0uggk34/1
    – Marco V
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:38
  • 3
    just do this: return x == n; jsfiddle.net/6txdrrdv
    – blex
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:41
  • Thanks, sometimes my thoughts are clouded and I can't think logically
    – Marco V
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:43
  • 2
    return (Math.log(n)/Math.log(2)) % 1 === 0
    – Josh Beam
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:49
  • ok I will give you the upvote ;) Give me a tip too?
    – Marco V
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:53

7 Answers 7

37

You can actually use ECMAScript5 Math.log:

function powerOfTwo(x) {
    return (Math.log(x)/Math.log(2)) % 1 === 0;
}

Remember, in math, to get a logarithm with an arbitrary base, you can just divide log10 of the operand (x in this case) by log10 of the base. And then to see if the number is a regular integer (and not a floating point), just check if the remainder is 0 by using the modulus % operator.

In ECMAScript6 you can do something like this:

function powerOfTwo(x) {
    return Math.log2(x) % 1 === 0;
}

See the MDN docs for Math.log2.

2
  • Math.log(1000)/Math.log(10) % 1 == 0 will give false, however it should give true, due to rounding off error in decimal points so this is not the best way. Commented Mar 16, 2022 at 6:04
  • const isPowerOfTwo2 = (x) => (Math.log(x) / Math.log(2)) % 1 === 0; isPowerOfTwo2(2147483648); false yet 2147483648 = 2^31 Commented Oct 18, 2022 at 19:10
30

Source: Bit twiddling Hacks,

function powerOf2(v) {
    return v && !(v & (v - 1));
}

You just bitwise AND the previous number with the current number. If the result is falsy, then it is a power of 2.

The explanation is in this answer.

Note:

  • This will not be 100% true for programming, mathematical, [also read 'interviewing']. Some edge cases not handled by this are decimals (0.1, 0.2, 0.8…) or zero values (0, 0.0, …)
3

Using bitwise operators, this is by far the best way in terms of efficiency and cleanliness of your code:

function PowerofTwo(n){
    return ((x != 0) && !(x & (x - 1)));
}

what it does is checks the bits that make up the number, i.e. 8 looks like this:

1 0 0 0

x-1 or 7 in this case looks like this

0 1 1 1

when the bitwise operator & is used it invokes an && on each bit of the number (thus 1 & 1 = 1, 1 & 0 = 0, 0 & 1 = 0, 0 & 0 = 1):

 1 0 0 0
-0 1 1 1
=========
 0 0 0 0

since the number turns into an exact 0 (or false when evaluted as a boolean) using the ! flag will return the correct answer

if you were to do this with a number like 7 it would look like this:

 0 1 1 1
-0 1 1 0
=========
 1 1 1 0

returning a number greater than zero causing the ! flag to take over and give the correct answer.

5
  • (x != 0) is the same as x . Thus, your answer is the same as @thefourtheye 's
    – blex
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:43
  • 1
    @blex: Wrong. x != 0 converts x to a number, just using x would convert it to a boolean. Big difference! Still, the answer is unnecessary. Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 19:55
  • @FelixKling Of course, I meant that in this case, it made no difference, since 0 and false are falsey values, and any other integer and true are truthy.
    – blex
    Commented Jun 18, 2015 at 21:26
  • 1
    with ES6 isPowerOfTwo = n => !(n&n-1) Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 10:42
  • Great explanation doesn't cover the negative tho. return (x>0) && ((x != 0) && !(x & (x - 1)));
    – fizampou
    Commented Mar 26, 2020 at 5:58
3

A number is a power of 2 if and only if log base 2 of that number is whole. The function below computes whether or not that is true:

function powerOfTwo(n){
    // Compute log base 2 of n using a quotient of natural logs
    var log_n = Math.log(n)/Math.log(2);
    // Round off any decimal component
    var log_n_floor = Math.floor(log_n);
    // The function returns true if and only if log_n is a whole number
    return log_n - log_n_floor == 0; 
}
2

Making use of ES6's Math.clz32(n) to count leading zeros of a 32-bit integer from 1 to 2³² - 1:

function isPowerOf2(n) {
  return Math.clz32(n) < Math.clz32(n - 1);
}
2

/**
 * @param {number} n
 * @return {boolean}
 */
const isPowerOfTwo = function(n) {
    if(n == 0) return false;

    while(n % 2 == 0){
        n = n/2
    }
    return n === 1
};

2

function PowerOfTwo(n){
  // Exercise for reader: confirm that n is an integer
  return (n !== 0) && (n & (n - 1)) === 0;
}
console.log(PowerOfTwo(3))
console.log(PowerOfTwo(4))

0

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