42

I'm new to reactjs, I want to fetch data in server, so that it will send page with data to client.

It is OK when the function getDefaultProps return dummy data like this {data: {books: [{..}, {..}]}}.

However not work with code below. The code execute in this sequence with error message "Cannot read property 'books' of undefined"

  1. getDefaultProps
  2. return
  3. fetch
  4. {data: {books: [{..}, {..}]}}

However, I expect the code should run in this sequence

  1. getDefaultProps
  2. fetch
  3. {data: {books: [{..}, {..}]}}
  4. return

Any Idea?

statics: {
    fetchData: function(callback) {
      var me = this;

      superagent.get('http://localhost:3100/api/books')
        .accept('json')
        .end(function(err, res){
          if (err) throw err;

          var data = {data: {books: res.body} }

          console.log('fetch');                  
          callback(data);  
        });
    }


getDefaultProps: function() {
    console.log('getDefaultProps');
    var me = this;
    me.data = '';

    this.fetchData(function(data){
        console.log('callback');
        console.log(data);
        me.data = data;      
      });

    console.log('return');
    return me.data;            
  },


  render: function() {
    console.log('render book-list');
    return (
      <div>
        <ul>
        {
          this.props.data.books.map(function(book) {
            return <li key={book.name}>{book.name}</li>
          })
        }
        </ul>
      </div>
    );
  }
23

What you're looking for is componentWillMount.

From the documentation:

Invoked once, both on the client and server, immediately before the initial rendering occurs. If you call setState within this method, render() will see the updated state and will be executed only once despite the state change.

So you would do something like this:

componentWillMount : function () {
    var data = this.getData();
    this.setState({data : data});
},

This way, render() will only be called once, and you'll have the data you're looking for in the initial render.

| improve this answer | |
  • 46
    ...but if getData fires a async request? – nav Jun 28 '16 at 13:20
  • 10
    @nav For async requests, you're going to have to set some initial state that indicates to the user that data is being fetched (perhaps a loading icon). You can still perform the fetch in componentWillMount, and when the data is retrieved, you can set that state again to indicate that the data is finished loading, and display it to the user. – Michael Parker Jun 28 '16 at 14:12
  • 1
    Yes, but then the data is fetched on the client and not the server. Isn't the OP asking to save this roundtrip if what is being requested is being rendered on the server and the async request is hitting that same server surely its better to process this all BEFORE sending the response down to the client? – nav Jul 4 '16 at 11:00
  • @nav you can fire this request synchronously by using await this.getData() – Nick Lucas Mar 5 '18 at 20:33
  • 3
    @MichaelParker componentWillMount is deprecated. Do you have any other alternatives? – Ivan Salo Dec 11 '19 at 14:41
12

A very simple example of this

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import { View, Text } from 'react-native';

export default class App extends React.Component  {

    constructor(props) {
      super(props);

      this.state = {
        data : null
      };
    }

    componentWillMount() {
        this.renderMyData();
    }

    renderMyData(){
        fetch('https://your url')
            .then((response) => response.json())
            .then((responseJson) => {
              this.setState({ data : responseJson })
            })
            .catch((error) => {
              console.error(error);
            });
    }

    render(){
        return(
            <View>
                {this.state.data ? <MyComponent data={this.state.data} /> : <MyLoadingComponnents /> }
            </View>
        );
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
7

The best answer I use to receive data from server and display it

 constructor(props){
            super(props);
            this.state = {
                items2 : [{}],
                isLoading: true
            }

        }

componentWillMount (){
 axios({
            method: 'get',
            responseType: 'json',
            url: '....',

        })
            .then(response => {
                self.setState({
                    items2: response ,
                    isLoading: false
                });
                console.log("Asmaa Almadhoun *** : " + self.state.items2);
            })
            .catch(error => {
                console.log("Error *** : " + error);
            });
    })}



    render() {
       return(
       { this.state.isLoading &&
                    <i className="fa fa-spinner fa-spin"></i>

                }
                { !this.state.isLoading &&
            //external component passing Server data to its classes
                     <TestDynamic  items={this.state.items2}/> 
                }
         ) }
| improve this answer | |
5

In React, props are used for component parameters not for handling data. There is a separate construct for that called state. Whenever you update state the component basically re-renders itself according to the new values.

var BookList = React.createClass({
  // Fetches the book list from the server
  getBookList: function() {
    superagent.get('http://localhost:3100/api/books')
      .accept('json')
      .end(function(err, res) {
        if (err) throw err;

        this.setBookListState(res);
      });
  },
  // Custom function we'll use to update the component state
  setBookListState: function(books) {
    this.setState({
      books: books.data
    });
  },
  // React exposes this function to allow you to set the default state
  // of your component
  getInitialState: function() {
    return {
      books: []
    };
  },
  // React exposes this function, which you can think of as the
  // constructor of your component. Call for your data here.
  componentDidMount: function() {
    this.getBookList();
  },
  render: function() {
    var books = this.state.books.map(function(book) {
      return (
        <li key={book.key}>{book.name}</li>
      );
    });

    return (
      <div>
        <ul>
          {books}
        </ul>
      </div>
    );
  }
});
| improve this answer | |
  • em... but as I know that data can be fetch and ready before render. your example will render twice. first render (with empty props) > fetch data and setState > render again with state. Correct me if I'm wrong – fingercross Jun 19 '15 at 6:28
  • You are right, the component will render twice. Making ajax calls is asynchronous, which was the issue with the original code. The only way you're getting the data before render is called is if you have a parent component that is in charge of data fetching and mounting BookList. Even in then, you will have to update the state of that component which will call render twice. – hkal Jun 19 '15 at 14:13
1

As a supplement of the answer of Michael Parker, you can make getData accept a callback function to active the setState update the data:

componentWillMount : function () {
    var data = this.getData(()=>this.setState({data : data}));
},
| improve this answer | |
0

Responded to a similar question with a potentially simple solution to this if anyone is still after an answer, the catch is it involves the use of redux-sagas:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/38701184/978306

Or just skip straight to the article I wrote on the topic:

https://medium.com/@navgarcha7891/react-server-side-rendering-with-simple-redux-store-hydration-9f77ab66900a

| improve this answer | |
0

You can use redial package for prefetching data on the server before attempting to render

| improve this answer | |
0

I've just stumbled upon this problem too, learning React, and solved it by showing spinner until the data is ready.

    render() {
    if (this.state.data === null) {
        return (
            <div className="MyView">
                <Spinner/>
            </div>
        );
    }
    else {
        return(
            <div className="MyView">
                <ReactJson src={this.state.data}/>
            </div>
        );
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

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