-4

Im writing this script here:

http://www.codeskulptor.org/#user40_OuVcoJ2Dj1_8.py

my fault lies in this code:

if 'i' not in globals():
    global i
    if 'j' in globals():
        i = j
    else:
        i = 0

I want to assign i to j if j exist in the global scope. if j doesn't exist i begins at 0. and j might get globally declared later in the script, if the input are right.

You run the script by pressing play in top left.

  • why is this downvoted with out commands – The6thSense Jun 19 '15 at 13:34
  • 1
    Please take a look at it before you downvote. I'm seeking help with the code not your opinion of the question. if you think its to easy, then tell me why I can't do it like this.. – Paal Pedersen Jun 19 '15 at 13:53
  • The link is legit. its to a python programming script-site from our school. – Paal Pedersen Jun 19 '15 at 13:55
  • The code fragment you posted "works" for me. Can you please post a fragment that fails? – cdarke Jun 19 '15 at 13:59
  • The error comes when I later in the script declare j globally – Paal Pedersen Jun 19 '15 at 14:03
2

This is not how global variables work in Python. If I'm guessing your intent correctly, you want this code:

if 'i' not in globals():
    global i

to be interpreted something like "If there's not currently a global variable named i, then create a global variable with that name." That's not what that code says (and as written, it doesn't make sense). The closest translation of that code is something like:

If there's no global variable named i, when I attempt to use a variable i in this scope, I'm referring to the global i (which doesn't exist) instead of creating a new variable i that only exists inside the current scope.

global never creates anything, it only tells the interpreter where to look for what you're referring to.

Some possibly useful links:

https://docs.python.org/2/faq/programming.html#what-are-the-rules-for-local-and-global-variables-in-python

https://infohost.nmt.edu/tcc/help/pubs/python/web/global-statement.html

  • it doesn't make sence cause i cannot post the whole code, thats why i posted the link to my script. – Paal Pedersen Jun 19 '15 at 14:01
  • Your entire code is wrong for exactly the same reason the excerpt you posted is wrong. Globals in Python work differently than your code thinks they work, and until you fix that, your code is broken. Did you read those links? Better yet, think about how to solve the problem without using global variables and why experienced developers prefer to avoid them. – bgporter Jun 19 '15 at 14:06
  • class Tester(): def i_(self): if 'i' not in globals(): global i if 'j' in globals(): i = j else: i = 0 else: i += 1 def j_(self): if 'j' not in globals(): global j j=0 else: j += 1 def close(self): global i global j del i del j A = Tester() A.i_() A.j_() A.j_() A.i_() print i print j A.close() – Paal Pedersen Jun 19 '15 at 14:18
  • I don't see any better explanation than this... – Iron Fist Jun 19 '15 at 18:53
0

it is possible to declare globals without setting them and they will not show in the globals() call. for example at the beginging of your program you can declare all your globals but not set them until you want.

global test
if 'test' in globals():
    print("test is in globals")
else:
    print ("test is not in globals")

this will result in test is not in globals however if you then set a value to test after doing this it will be in globals()

global test
if 'test' in globals():
    print("test is in globals")
    print(test)
else:
    print ("test is not in globals")
    test=45
if 'test' in globals():
    print("test is now in globals")
    print(test)
else:
    print ("test is still not in globals")

this will return:

test is not in globals

test is now in globals

45

meaning that you can declare the name of the variable check to see if it is in globals() then set it and check again. in your code you could try:

global i
global j
if 'i' not in globals():
    if 'j' in globals():
        i = j
    else:
        i = 0
if 'j' not in globals():
    j = something
else:
    j =somethingElse

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