4

I was going through this problem in one of exam paper and found one solution in answer book. I am not able to understand algorithm behind it. Can anyone explain me how this algorithm works?

Given n non-negative integers representing an elevation map where the width of each bar is 1, compute how much water it is able to trap after raining.

For example, Given the input

[0,1,0,2,1,0,1,3,2,1,2,1] 

the return value would be

6

Solution as per answer book is this

public class Solution {
    public int trap(int[] height) {
        if (height.length <=2 )
            return 0;
        int h = 0, sum = 0, i = 0, j = height.length - 1;
        while(i < j)
        {
            if ( height[i] < height[j] )
            {
                h = Math.max(h,height[i]);
                sum += h - height[i];
                i++;
            }
            else
            {   
                h = Math.max(h,height[j]);
                sum += h - height[j];
                j--;
            }
        }
        return sum;
    }
}

Thanks

3

WoDoSc was nice enough to draw a diagram of the elevations and trapped water. The water can only be trapped between two higher elevations.

What I did was run the code and output the results so you can see how the trapped water is calculated. The code starts at both ends of the "mountain" range. Whichever end is lower is moved closer to the center.

In the case where the two ends are the same height, the right end is moved closer to the center. You could move the left end closer to the center instead.

The first column is the height and index of the elevations on the left. The second column is the height and index of the elevations on the right.

The third column is the maximum minimum height. In other words, the maximum height of the left or the right, whichever maximum is smaller. This number is important to determine the local water level.

The fourth column is the sum.

Follow along with the diagram and you can see how the algorithm works.

0,0   1,11   0   0
1,1   1,11   1   0
1,1   2,10   1   0
0,2   2,10   1   1
2,3   2,10   2   1
2,3   1,9    2   2
2,3   2,8    2   2
2,3   3,7    2   2
1,4   3,7    2   3
0,5   3,7    2   5
1,6   3,7    2   6

6

And here's the code. Putting print and println statements in appropriate places can help you understand what the code is doing.

package com.ggl.testing;

public class RainWater implements Runnable {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new RainWater().run();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        int[] height = { 0, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 1, 3, 2, 1, 2, 1 };
        System.out.println(trap(height));
    }

    public int trap(int[] height) {
        if (height.length <= 2) {
            return 0;
        }

        int h = 0, sum = 0, i = 0, j = height.length - 1;

        while (i < j) {
            System.out.print(height[i] + "," + i + "   " + height[j] + "," + j
                    + "   ");

            if (height[i] < height[j]) {
                h = Math.max(h, height[i]);
                sum += h - height[i];
                i++;
            } else {
                h = Math.max(h, height[j]);
                sum += h - height[j];
                j--;
            }

            System.out.println(h + "   " + sum);
        }

        return sum;
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
  • That was nice of you but can you please explain me the logic of algorithm. I was thinking to calculate running sum of elevation till maximum elevation and then calculate running sum of elevation till maximum elevation but in reverse direction. I am not sure how above solution achieves this ? – anonymous Jun 19 '15 at 14:56
  • @anonymous: See if the enhanced explanation is better. – Gilbert Le Blanc Jun 19 '15 at 15:10
4

I know that probably it's not the best way to represent it graphically, but you can imagine the situation as the following figure:

enter image description here

Where the red bars are the terrain (with elevations according to the array of your example), and the blue bars are the water that can be "trapped" into the "valleys" of the terrain.

Simplifying, the algorithm loops all the bar left-to-right (if left is smaller) or right-to-left (if right is smaller), the variable h stores the maximum height found during each step of the loop, because the water can not be higher than the maximum height of the terrains, and to know how much water can be trapped, it sums the differences between the height of the water (maximum height h) and the elevation of the terrain on a specific point, to get the actual quantity of water.

| improve this answer | |
  • The key insight from this graph is that the filled up terrain is monotonically rising until it reaches a maximum and is monotonically sinking from there. – biziclop Jun 19 '15 at 14:54
0

The algorithm works by processing the land from the left (i) and the right (j). i and j are counters that work towards each other approaching the middle of the land.

h is a variable that tracks the max height found thus far considering the lower side.

The land is processed by letting i and j worked "toward each other." When I read the code, I pictured two imaginary walls squeezing the water toward the middle where the lowest wall moves toward the higher wall. The algorithm continues to sum up the volume of water. It uses h - height[x] because water can only be contained by inside the lowest point between two walls. So essentially it continues to sum up the volume of water from the left and right and subtracts out and water displaced by higher elevation blocks.

Maybe better variable names would have been

  • leftWall instead of i
  • rightWall instead of j
  • waterMaxHeight instead of h
| improve this answer | |
0

I think above solution is difficult to understand.I have a simple solution which take o(n) extra space & o(n) time complexity.

Step of algorithm

1.Maintain an array which contain maximum of all element which is right side of current element.

2.maintain a variable max from left side which contain maximum of all element which is left side of current element.

3.find minimum of max from left & max from right which is already present in array.

4.if minimum value is greater than the current value in array than add difference of than in ans & add the difference with current value & update max from left.

import java.util.*;
import java.lang.*;
import java.io.*;


class Solution
{
	public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
	{
		int[] array= {0, 1, 0, 2, 1, 0, 1, 3, 2, 1, 2, 1 };
		int[] arrayofmax=new int[array.length];
		int max=0;
		arrayofmax[array.length-1]=0;
		for(int x=array.length-1;x>0;x--){
		    if(max<array[x]){
		        max=array[x];
		    }
		    arrayofmax[x-1]=max;
		}
		int ans=0;
		int maxfromleft=0;
		
		for(int i=0;i<array.length-1;i++){
		    if(maxfromleft<array[i]){
		        maxfromleft=array[i];
		    }
		    int min=maxfromleft>arrayofmax[i+1]?arrayofmax[i+1]:maxfromleft;
		    if(min>array[i+1]){
		        ans+=min-array[i+1];
		        array[i+1]=min;
		    }
		}
		System.out.println(ans);
	}
}

May be my algorithm is same as above but i think this implementation is easy to understand

| improve this answer | |
0

Trapping Rain Water problem solved in Java.

class Store
{
    static int arr[] = new int[]{0, 1, 0, 2, 2};

    // Method for maximum amount of water
    static int StoreWater(int n)
    {
         int max = 0;
         int f = 0;
         for (int i = 1; i < n; i++)
         {
             max = Math.max(arr[i], max);
             f += Math.max(arr[i], max) - arr[i];
         }
         return f;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        System.out.println("Maximum water that can be accumulated is " + 
                                        findWater(arr.length));
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    OP is looking for an explanation of a solution. This is not a relevant answer. Also, add an explanation with your code snippet. – nkshio Sep 9 '18 at 18:46
0

Here is a different and easy approach for water trapping problem. O(1) space and O(N) time complexity.
Logic:
-> Let’s loop from 0 index to the end of the input values.
-> If we find a wall greater than or equal to the previous wall
-> make note of the index of that wall in a var called prev_index
-> keep adding previous wall’s height minus current (ith) wall to the variable water.
-> have a temp variable that also stores the same value as water.
-> Loop till the end, if you dont find any wall greater than or equal to the previous wall, then quit.
-> If the above point is true (i.e, if prev_index < size of input array), then subtract the temp variable from water, and loop from end of the input array to prev_index and find a wall greater than or equal to the previous wall (in this case, the last wall from backwards)

The concept here is if there is a larger wall to the right you can retain water with height equal to the smaller wall on the left.
If there are no larger walls to the right, then start from left. There must be a larger wall to your left now. You're essentially looping twice, so O(2N), but asymptotically O(N), and of course O(1) space.

JAVA Code Here:

class WaterTrap 
{ 

    public static void waterTrappingO1SpaceOnTime(){
        int arr[] = {1,2,3,2,1,0}; // answer = 14
        int size = arr.length-1;
        int prev = arr[0];  //Let first element be stored as previous, we shall loop from index 1
        int prev_index = 0; //We need to store previous wall's index
        int water = 0;
        int temp = 0;   //temp will store water until a larger wall is found. If there are no larger walls, we shall delete temp value from water
        for(int i=1; i<= size; i++){
            if(arr[i] >= prev){     // If current wall is taller then previous wall, make current wall as the previous wall, and its index as previous wall's index for the subsequent loops
                prev = arr[i];
                prev_index = i;
                temp = 0;   //because larger or same height wall is found
            } else {
                water += prev - arr[i]; //Since current wall is shorter then previous, we subtract previous wall height from current wall height and add to water
                temp += prev - arr[i];  // Store same value in temp as well, if we dont find larger wall, we will subtract temp from water
            }
        }
// If the last wall was larger than or equal to the previous wall, then prev_index would be equal to size of the array (last element)

// If we didn't find a wall greater than or equal to the previous wall from the left, then prev_index must be less than index of last element
        if(prev_index < size){
            water -= temp; //Temp would've stored the water collected from previous largest wall till the end of array if no larger wall was found. So it has excess water. Delete that from 'water' var 
            prev = arr[size];   // We start from the end of the array, so previous should be assigned to the last element. 
            for(int i=size; i>= prev_index; i--){ //Loop from end of array up to the 'previous index' which would contain the "largest wall from the left"
                if(arr[i] >= prev){ //Right end wall will be definitely smaller than the 'previous index' wall 
                    prev = arr[i];
                } else {
                    water += prev - arr[i];
                }
            }

        }
        System.out.println("MAX WATER === " + water);
    }
 public static void main(String[] args)  { 
          waterTrappingO1SpaceOnTime();
   } 

}
| improve this answer | |

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