6

I need to write a method in java to return the power of only integer number and i want this method to return -1 or fire exception if the number exceeds the Integer.MAX_VALUE:

I tried the first and easy step:

public static int GetPower(int base, int power)
{
    int result = 1;

    for(int i = 1; i<=power; i++)
    {
        result *= base;
        if (result <  0 ) {
            break; // not very acurate
        }
    }
    if (result < 0 ) {
        return -1;
    }
    return result;
}

Is the above method accurate, as after debugging i found that when the result exceeds the Integer.MAX_VALUE it will go to negative number, or there is another way to handle this?

  • 1
    you could convert your base and power to BigDecimals, and then result compare with Integer.MAX_VALUE – user902383 Jun 19 '15 at 14:20
  • 1
    @user902383 while you have absolutely right for the case int (where you can use bigint to validate) it would be interesting how you can handle this for bigints then? – dognose Jun 19 '15 at 14:24
  • Alternativly you could divide Integer.MAX_VALUE by base, and when your result will be bigger than that value return error – user902383 Jun 19 '15 at 14:24
  • @dognose BigInteger is limited by memory. – Maroun Jun 19 '15 at 14:27
  • 1
    What if power is a negative integer value? – Buhake Sindi Jun 19 '15 at 14:29
4

Your method will work if the base can only be positive integer. Underflow might occur your base is a negative integer and your power is an odd number.

An easy but not optimal way to handle this situation is to use long data type to store the output and compare the output to check whether it is between Integer.MAX_VALUE and Integer.MIN_VALUE.

public static int GetPower(int base, int power){
 long result = 1;

 for(int i = 1; i <= power; i++)
 {
    result *= base;
    if (result > Integer.MAX_VALUE || result < Integer.MIN_VALUE) {
        return -1;
    }
 }
 return result;
}
  • 2
    Ha. If you want to allow the base to be negative this answer is better than mine. – Nitram Jun 19 '15 at 14:40
3

Nitram and PythaLye's answers work but I don't like the idea of using another data type to check boundaries. Instead, I'd suggest you use this simple check :

// This basically means result * base > boundary
if ((base > 0 && result > (Integer.MAX_VALUE / base))
   || (base < 0 && result < (Integer.MIN_VALUE / -base)) // Negative base case
{
    return -1;
}

So the code would be :

public static int GetPower(int base, int power)
{
    int result = 1;

    for(int i = 1; i<=power; i++)
    {
        if ((base > 0 && result > (Integer.MAX_VALUE / base))
           || (base < 0 && result < (Integer.MIN_VALUE / -base)) {
            return -1;
        }

        result *= base;
    }

    return result;
}
  • 1
    That actually does not work. For example if base is negative the (Integer.MIN_VALUE / base) will result in some big positive value. Legal values of result will always be smaller than this value. You want your negative case to read (Integer.MIN_VALUE / -base) – Nitram Jun 19 '15 at 15:24
  • 1
    Good catch @Nitram, corrected now – Arminius Jun 19 '15 at 15:51
2

The effect you noticed is a numeric overflow. If you add one to Integer.MAX_VALUE you will get Integer.MIN_VALUE as result.

Now what you need is more space to store your value. As you want to work inside the 32-bit Integer space, you need the next bigger thing. And this would be a 64-bit Long value. This is in any case faster compared to any BigDecimals usage.

You just have to check inside any loop step if your value exceeded Integer.MAX_VALUE and cancel it, if that happens.

So the resulting code would be something like this:

public static int GetPower(int base, int power)
{
    long result = 1;

    for(int i = 1; i <= power; i++)
    {
        result *= base;
        if (result > Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
            return -1;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

In addition I suggest you validate the input of the function to ensure that base is not negative.

2

As you have simple implementation of method pow, which does not accept negative numbers or values, my suggestion will be to create highest allowed value, and just check is your result is smaller than it.

public static int getPower(int base, int power)
    {
        int result = 1;
        int maxAllowed = Integer.MAX_VALUE / base;

        for(int i = 1; i<=power; i++)
        {
            result *= base;
            if (i!=power && result>=maxAllowed){
                return -1;
            }

        }

        return result;
    }

But in general, I strongly recommend do not reinventing wheel, and go with Math.pow method

2

As already mentioned, using a "bigger" datatype allows validation and easy computation - but what if there is no bigger datatype?

You can mathematically test, if it would result in an overflow:

If you are caluclating base^power, that means base^power = result - it also means power-th square of result = base - The Maximum result allowed is Integer.MAX_VALUE - else you have an overflow.

The power-th root of ANY number larger than zero will ALWAYS be inside the range ]0,number] - no chance of arithmetic overflows.

So - let's compare the base you are using with the power-th root of Integer.MAX_VALUE - is base LARGER? Then you will encounter an overflow - else it would stick bellow (or be equal to) the result of Integer.MAX_VALUE

private static double powSafe(double base, int pow){
    //this is the p-th root of the maximum integer allowed
    double root = Math.pow(Integer.MAX_VALUE, 1.0/pow); 

    if (root < base){
        throw new ArithmeticException("The calculation of " + base + "^" + pow + " would overflow.");
    }else{
        return Math.pow(base, pow);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] argv)
{
    double rootOfMaxInt = Math.pow(Integer.MAX_VALUE, 1.0/2);
    try{
        //that should be INTEGER.MAX_VALUE, so valid.
        double d1 = powSafe(rootOfMaxInt, 2);  
        System.out.println(rootOfMaxInt + "^2 = " + d1);
    }catch (ArithmeticException e){
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    try{
        //this should overflow cause "+1"
        double d2 = powSafe(rootOfMaxInt +1, 2); 
        System.out.println("("rootOfMaxInt + "+ 1)^2 = " + d1);
    }catch (ArithmeticException e){
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }

    double the67thRootOfMaxInt = Math.pow(Integer.MAX_VALUE, 1.0/67);
    try{
        //and so, it continues
        double d3 = powSafe(the67thRootOfMaxInt, 67); 
        System.out.println(the67thRootOfMaxInt + "^67 = " + d3);

        double d4 = powSafe(the67thRootOfMaxInt +1, 67); 
        System.out.println("(" + the67thRootOfMaxInt + " + 1)^67 = " + d3);

    }catch (ArithmeticException e){
        System.out.println(e.getMessage());
    }
}   

leads to

46340.950001051984^2 = 2.147483647E9
The calculation of 46341.950001051984^2 would overflow.
1.3781057199632372^67 = 2.1474836470000062E9
The calculation of 2.378105719963237^67 would overflow.

Note, that there are imprecisions appearing cause double has no infinite precision, which already truncates the Expression 2nd square of Integer.Max_Value, cause Integer.Max_value is odd.

0

You check is wrong. Try your method with 1<<32 and 2 as parameters.

Correct check will be something like this result==result*base/base if it is true than you can multiply result and base without overflow.

0

There is already a perfectly viable power function in java.lang.Math. I strongly suggest to make use of it to cover for the edge cases.

public class GetPower {

    public static int getPower(int base, int power) {
        double result = Math.pow(base, power);
        // check result in range
        if (result > Integer.MAX_VALUE)
            return -1;
        if (result < Integer.MIN_VALUE)
            return -1;
        return (int) result;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int base=0; base<=10; ++base) {
            for (int power=0; power<=10; ++power) {
                int result = getPower(base, power);
                System.out.println("getPower(" + base + ", " + power + ") = " + result);
            }
        }
    }

}

There is no need to reinvent the wheel. No need to worry about floating point inaccuracies - all int values are perfectly representable as double's.

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