3712

If you have a java.io.InputStream object, how should you process that object and produce a String?


Suppose I have an InputStream that contains text data, and I want to convert it to a String, so for example I can write that to a log file.

What is the easiest way to take the InputStream and convert it to a String?

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) {
    // ???
}
  • 773
    Boy, I'm absolutely in love with Java, but this question comes up so often you'd think they'd just figure out that the chaining of streams is somewhat difficult and either make helpers to create various combinations or rethink the whole thing. – Bill K Nov 21 '08 at 17:16
  • 29
    The answers to this question only work if you want to read the stream's contents fully (until it is closed). Since that is not always intended (http requests with a keep-alive connection won't be closed), these method calls block (not giving you the contents). – f1sh Jul 14 '10 at 13:32
  • 18
    You need to know and specify the character encoding for the stream, or you will have character encoding bugs, since you will be using a randomly chosen encoding depending on which machine/operating system/platform or version thereof your code is run on. That is, do not use methods that depend on the platform default encoding. – Christoffer Hammarström Dec 17 '10 at 13:50
  • 7
    Just to have fun with my own comment from 9 years ago, these days I use Groovy's "String s=new File("SomeFile.txt").text" to read an entire file all at once and it works great. I am happy with using groovy for my non-production (scripting) code and--well honestly forcing you to deal with encoding and extremely long files the way java does is a really good idea for production code anyway so it works for it's purpose, Groovy works for quick scripts which java isn't great at--Just use the right tool for the job and it all works out. – Bill K Nov 1 '17 at 23:58
  • Just simplifying: ByteArrayOutputStream outputBytes = new ByteArrayOutputStream(); for(byte[] b = new byte[512]; 0 < inputStream.read(b); outputBytes.write(b)); return new String(outputBytes.toByteArray(), StandardCharsets.UTF_8); – Felypp Oliveira Dec 13 '17 at 15:21

58 Answers 58

4

JDK 7/8 answer that closes the stream and still throws an IOException:

StringBuilder build = new StringBuilder();
byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
int length;
try (InputStream is = getInputStream()) {
  while ((length = is.read(buf)) != -1) {
    build.append(new String(buf, 0, length));
  }
}
4

I have written a class that does just that, so I figured I'd share it with everyone. Sometimes you don't want to add Apache Commons just for one thing, and want something dumber than Scanner that doesn't examine the content.

Usage is as follows

// Read from InputStream
String data = new ReaderSink(inputStream, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drain();

// Read from File
data = new ReaderSink(file, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drain();

// Drain input stream to console
new ReaderSink(inputStream, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drainTo(System.out);

Here is the code for ReaderSink:

import java.io.*;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;

/**
 * A simple sink class that drains a {@link Reader} to a {@link String} or
 * to a {@link Writer}.
 *
 * @author Ben Barkay
 * @version 2/20/2014
 */
public class ReaderSink {
    /**
     * The default buffer size to use if no buffer size was specified.
     */
    public static final int DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE = 1024;

    /**
     * The {@link Reader} that will be drained.
     */
    private final Reader in;

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified file and charset.
     * @param file      The file to read from.
     * @param charset   The charset to use.
     * @throws FileNotFoundException    If the file was not found on the filesystem.
     */
    public ReaderSink(File file, Charset charset) throws FileNotFoundException {
        this(new FileInputStream(file), charset);
    }

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified {@link InputStream}.
     * @param in        The {@link InputStream} to drain.
     * @param charset   The charset to use.
     */
    public ReaderSink(InputStream in, Charset charset) {
        this(new InputStreamReader(in, charset));
    }

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified {@link Reader}.
     * @param in    The reader to drain.
     */
    public ReaderSink(Reader in) {
        this.in = in;
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, returning a {@link String} containing
     * all of the read information. This method will use {@link #DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE} for
     * its buffer size.
     * @return  A {@link String} containing all of the information that was read.
     */
    public String drain() throws IOException {
        return drain(DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE);
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, returning a {@link String} containing
     * all of the read information.
     * @param bufferSize    The size of the buffer to use when reading.
     * @return  A {@link String} containing all of the information that was read.
     */
    public String drain(int bufferSize) throws IOException {
        StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
        drainTo(stringWriter, bufferSize);
        return stringWriter.toString();
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, writing it to the
     * specified {@link Writer}. This method will use {@link #DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE} for
     * its buffer size.
     * @param out   The {@link Writer} to write to.
     */
    public void drainTo(Writer out) throws IOException {
        drainTo(out, DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE);
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, writing it to the
     * specified {@link Writer}.
     * @param out           The {@link Writer} to write to.
     * @param bufferSize    The size of the buffer to use when reader.
     */
    public void drainTo(Writer out, int bufferSize) throws IOException {
        char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
        int read;
        while ((read = in.read(buffer)) > -1) {
            out.write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
    }
}
4

Guava provides much shorter efficient autoclosing solution in case when input stream comes from classpath resource (which seems to be popular task):

byte[] bytes = Resources.toByteArray(classLoader.getResource(path));

or

String text = Resources.toString(classLoader.getResource(path), StandardCharsets.UTF_8);

There is also general concept of ByteSource and CharSource that gently take care of both opening and closing the stream.

So, for example, instead of explicitly opening a small file to read its contents:

String content = Files.asCharSource(new File("robots.txt"), StandardCharsets.UTF_8).read();
byte[] data = Files.asByteSource(new File("favicon.ico")).read();

or just

String content = Files.toString(new File("robots.txt"), StandardCharsets.UTF_8);
byte[] data = Files.toByteArray(new File("favicon.ico"));
  • Great tip about guava's Resources. – Sokolov Feb 27 '16 at 15:01
4

The below code worked for me.

URL url = MyClass.class.getResource("/" + configFileName);
BufferedInputStream bi = (BufferedInputStream) url.getContent();
byte[] buffer = new byte[bi.available() ];
int bytesRead = bi.read(buffer);
String out = new String(buffer);

Please note, according to Java docs, the available() method might not work with InputStream but always works with BufferedInputStream. In case you don't want to use available() method we can always use the below code

URL url = MyClass.class.getResource("/" + configFileName);
BufferedInputStream bi = (BufferedInputStream) url.getContent();
File f = new File(url.getPath());
byte[] buffer = new byte[ (int) f.length()];
int bytesRead = bi.read(buffer);
String out = new String(buffer);

I am not sure if there will be any encoding issues. Please comment, if there will be any issues with the code.

  • 4
    The whole point of using InputStream is, that a) you don't know the length of the complete stream (which bails out anything depending on available) and b) the stream can be anything - a file, a socket, something internal (which bails out anything based on File.size()). Regarding available: This will cut off data if the stream is longer than the buffer size. – A.H. Jul 24 '12 at 10:26
  • There is a warning in the Javadoc specificaly against the way you are using available(), and there is nothing in the specification of read() that guarantees it will fill the buffer: that's why it returns a read count. – user207421 Feb 24 '17 at 0:09
4
InputStream is = Context.openFileInput(someFileName); // whatever format you have

ByteArrayOutputStream bos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

byte[] b = new byte[8192];
for (int bytesRead; (bytesRead = is.read(b)) != -1;) {
    bos.write(b, 0, bytesRead);
}

String output = bos.toString(someEncoding);
4

Raghu K Nair Was the only one using a scanner. The code I use is a little different:

String convertToString(InputStream in){
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(in)
    scanner.useDelimiter("\\A");

    boolean hasInput = scanner.hasNext();
    if (hasInput) {
        return scanner.next();
    } else {
        return null;
    }

}

About Delimiters: How do I use a delimiter in Java Scanner?

4

Based on the second part of the accepted Apache Commons answer but with the small gap filled in for always closing the stream:

    String theString;
    try {
        theString = IOUtils.toString(inputStream, encoding);
    } finally {
        IOUtils.closeQuietly(inputStream);
    }
4

Well, you can program it for yourself... It's not complicated...

String Inputstream2String (InputStream is) throws IOException
    {
        final int PKG_SIZE = 1024;
        byte[] data = new byte [PKG_SIZE];
        StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder(PKG_SIZE * 10);
        int size;

        size = is.read(data, 0, data.length);
        while (size > 0)
        {
            String str = new String(data, 0, size);
            buffer.append(str);
            size = is.read(data, 0, data.length);
        }
        return buffer.toString();
    }
  • 1
    Since you're using buffer variable locally with no chance of being shared across multiple threads you should consider changing its type to StringBuilder, to avoid the overhead of (useless) synchronization. – user246645 Nov 8 '13 at 10:27
  • That's a good point alex!. I thing that we both agree that this method isn't thread-safe in many ways. Even the input stream operations aren't thread-safe. – Victor Nov 8 '13 at 16:19
  • 1
    If the stream contains UTF-8 character that spans across several lines, this algorithm can cut the character in two breaking the string. – Vlad Lifliand Aug 8 '14 at 22:47
  • 1
    @VladLifliand How exactly would a UTF-8 character manage to span across several lines? That's impossible by definition. You probably meant something else. – Christian Hujer Jan 31 '16 at 22:05
  • @ChristianHujer He probably means buffers instead of lines. UTF-8 codepoints/characters can be multi-byte. – ᴠɪɴᴄᴇɴᴛ Mar 17 at 20:07
3

Try these 4 statements..

As per the point recalled by Fred, it is not recommended to append a String with += operator since every time a new char is appended to the existing String creating a new String object again and assigning its address to st while the old st object becomes garbage.

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is)
{
    int k;
    StringBuffer sb=new StringBuffer();
    while((k=fin.read()) != -1)
    {
        sb.append((char)k);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

Not recommended, but this is also a way

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) { 
    int k;
    String st="";
    while((k=is.read()) != -1)
    {
        st+=(char)k;
    }
    return st;
}
  • 2
    String concatenation in a loop with the += operator is not a good idea. It is better to use a StringBuilder or a StringBuffer. – Fred Feb 20 '14 at 15:24
3
public String read(InputStream in) throws IOException {
    try (BufferedReader buffer = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in))) {
        return buffer.lines().collect(Collectors.joining("\n"));
    }
}
3

With Okio:

String result = Okio.buffer(Okio.source(inputStream)).readUtf8();
3

You can use Apache Commons.

In the IOUtils you can find the toString method with three helpful implementations.

public static String toString(InputStream input) throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charset.defaultCharset());
}

public static String toString(InputStream input) throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charset.defaultCharset());
}

public static String toString(InputStream input, String encoding)
            throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charsets.toCharset(encoding));
}
  • 1
    What is difference between first 2 methods? – rkosegi Oct 3 '18 at 19:13
2
InputStreamReader i = new InputStreamReader(s);
BufferedReader str = new BufferedReader(i);
String msg = str.readLine();
System.out.println(msg);

Here s is your InputStream object which will get convert into String

  • will it work if last 2 lines are inserted in do-while loop? – KNU Apr 7 '14 at 11:34
  • 5
    will work only if the InputStream is one-liner – Stavros Apr 30 '14 at 8:22
  • There is nothing in the question about lines. – user207421 Feb 24 '17 at 0:10
2

You can use Cactoos:

String text = new TextOf(inputStream).asString();

UTF-8 encoding is the default one. If you need another one:

String text = new TextOf(inputStream, "UTF-16").asString();
2

ISO-8859-1

Here is a very performant way to do this if you know your input stream's encoding is ISO-8859-1 or ASCII. It (1) avoids the unnecessary synchronization present in StringWriter's internal StringBuffer, (2) avoids the overhead of InputStreamReader, and (3) minimizes the number of times StringBuilder's internal char array must be copied.

public static String iso_8859_1(InputStream is) throws IOException {
    StringBuilder chars = new StringBuilder(Math.max(is.available(), 4096));
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
    int n;
    while ((n = is.read(buffer)) != -1) {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            chars.append((char)(buffer[i] & 0xFF));
        }
    }
    return chars.toString();
}

UTF-8

The same general strategy may be used for a stream encoded with UTF-8:

public static String utf8(InputStream is) throws IOException {
    StringBuilder chars = new StringBuilder(Math.max(is.available(), 4096));
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
    int n;
    int state = 0;
    while ((n = is.read(buffer)) != -1) {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if ((state = nextStateUtf8(state, buffer[i])) >= 0) {
                chars.appendCodePoint(state);
            } else if (state == -1) { //error
                state = 0;
                chars.append('\uFFFD'); //replacement char
            }
        }
    }
    return chars.toString();
}

where the nextStateUtf8() function is defined as follows:

/**
 * Returns the next UTF-8 state given the next byte of input and the current state.
 * If the input byte is the last byte in a valid UTF-8 byte sequence,
 * the returned state will be the corresponding unicode character (in the range of 0 through 0x10FFFF).
 * Otherwise, a negative integer is returned. A state of -1 is returned whenever an
 * invalid UTF-8 byte sequence is detected.
 */
static int nextStateUtf8(int currentState, byte nextByte) {
    switch (currentState & 0xF0000000) {
        case 0:
            if ((nextByte & 0x80) == 0) { //0 trailing bytes (ASCII)
                return nextByte;
            } else if ((nextByte & 0xE0) == 0xC0) { //1 trailing byte
                if (nextByte == (byte) 0xC0 || nextByte == (byte) 0xC1) { //0xCO & 0xC1 are overlong
                    return -1;
                } else {
                    return nextByte & 0xC000001F;
                }
            } else if ((nextByte & 0xF0) == 0xE0) { //2 trailing bytes
                if (nextByte == (byte) 0xE0) { //possibly overlong
                    return nextByte & 0xA000000F;
                } else if (nextByte == (byte) 0xED) { //possibly surrogate
                    return nextByte & 0xB000000F;
                } else {
                    return nextByte & 0x9000000F;
                }
            } else if ((nextByte & 0xFC) == 0xF0) { //3 trailing bytes
                if (nextByte == (byte) 0xF0) { //possibly overlong
                    return nextByte & 0x80000007;
                } else {
                    return nextByte & 0xE0000007;
                }
            } else if (nextByte == (byte) 0xF4) { //3 trailing bytes, possibly undefined
                return nextByte & 0xD0000007;
            } else {
                return -1;
            }
        case 0xE0000000: //3rd-to-last continuation byte
            return (nextByte & 0xC0) == 0x80 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0x9000003F : -1;
        case 0x80000000: //3rd-to-last continuation byte, check overlong
            return (nextByte & 0xE0) == 0xA0 || (nextByte & 0xF0) == 0x90 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0x9000003F : -1;
        case 0xD0000000: //3rd-to-last continuation byte, check undefined
            return (nextByte & 0xF0) == 0x80 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0x9000003F : -1;
        case 0x90000000: //2nd-to-last continuation byte
            return (nextByte & 0xC0) == 0x80 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0xC000003F : -1;
        case 0xA0000000: //2nd-to-last continuation byte, check overlong
            return (nextByte & 0xE0) == 0xA0 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0xC000003F : -1;
        case 0xB0000000: //2nd-to-last continuation byte, check surrogate
            return (nextByte & 0xE0) == 0x80 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0xC000003F : -1;
        case 0xC0000000: //last continuation byte
            return (nextByte & 0xC0) == 0x80 ? currentState << 6 | nextByte & 0x3F : -1;
        default:
            return -1;
    }
}

Auto-Detect Encoding

If your input stream was encoded using either ASCII or ISO-8859-1 or UTF-8, but you're not sure which, we can use a similar method to the last, but with an additional encoding-detection component to auto-detect the encoding before returning the string.

public static String autoDetect(InputStream is) throws IOException {
    StringBuilder chars = new StringBuilder(Math.max(is.available(), 4096));
    byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
    int n;
    int state = 0;
    boolean ascii = true;
    while ((n = is.read(buffer)) != -1) {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if ((state = nextStateUtf8(state, buffer[i])) > 0x7F)
                ascii = false;
            chars.append((char)(buffer[i] & 0xFF));
        }
    }

    if (ascii || state < 0) { //probably not UTF-8
        return chars.toString();
    }
    //probably UTF-8
    int pos = 0;
    char[] charBuf = new char[2];
    for (int i = 0, len = chars.length(); i < len; i++) {
        if ((state = nextStateUtf8(state, (byte)chars.charAt(i))) >= 0) {
            boolean hi = Character.toChars(state, charBuf, 0) == 2;
            chars.setCharAt(pos++, charBuf[0]);
            if (hi) {
                chars.setCharAt(pos++, charBuf[1]);
            }
        }
    }
    return chars.substring(0, pos);
}

If your input stream has an encoding that is neither ISO-8859-1 nor ASCII nor UTF-8, then I defer to the other answers already present.

1

The following doesn't address the original question, but rather some of the responses.

Several responses suggest loops of the form

String line = null;
while((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
  // ...
}

or

for(String line = reader.readLine(); line != null; line = reader.readLine()) {
    // ...
}

The first form pollutes the namespace of the enclosing scope by declaring a variable "read" in the enclosing scope that will not be used for anything outside the for loop. The second form duplicates the readline() call.

Here is a much cleaner way of writing this sort of loop in Java. It turns out that the first clause in a for-loop doesn't require an actual initializer value. This keeps the scope of the variable "line" to within the body of the for loop. Much more elegant! I haven't seen anybody using this form anywhere (I randomly discovered it one day years ago), but I use it all the time.

for (String line; (line = reader.readLine()) != null; ) {
    //...
}
1

This solution to this question is not the simplest, but since NIO streams and channels have not been mentioned, here goes a version which uses NIO channels and a ByteBuffer to convert a stream into a string.

public static String streamToStringChannel(InputStream in, String encoding, int bufSize) throws IOException {
    ReadableByteChannel channel = Channels.newChannel(in);
    ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(bufSize);
    ByteArrayOutputStream bout = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    WritableByteChannel outChannel = Channels.newChannel(bout);
    while (channel.read(byteBuffer) > 0 || byteBuffer.position() > 0) {
        byteBuffer.flip();  //make buffer ready for write
        outChannel.write(byteBuffer);
        byteBuffer.compact(); //make buffer ready for reading
    }
    channel.close();
    outChannel.close();
    return bout.toString(encoding);
}

Here is an example how to use it:

try (InputStream in = new FileInputStream("/tmp/large_file.xml")) {
    String x = streamToStringChannel(in, "UTF-8", 1);
    System.out.println(x);
}

The performance of this method should be good for large files.

0

This snippet was found in \sdk\samples\android-19\connectivity\NetworkConnect\NetworkConnectSample\src\main\java\com\example\android\networkconnect\MainActivity.java which is licensed under Apache License, Version 2.0 and written by Google.

/** Reads an InputStream and converts it to a String.
 * @param stream InputStream containing HTML from targeted site.
 * @param len Length of string that this method returns.
 * @return String concatenated according to len parameter.
 * @throws java.io.IOException
 * @throws java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException
 */
private String readIt(InputStream stream, int len) throws IOException, UnsupportedEncodingException {
    Reader reader = null;
    reader = new InputStreamReader(stream, "UTF-8");
    char[] buffer = new char[len];
    reader.read(buffer);
    return new String(buffer);
}
0

Method to convert inputStream to String

public static String getStringFromInputStream(InputStream inputStream) {

    BufferedReader bufferedReader = null;
    StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    String line;

    try {
        bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(
                inputStream));
        while ((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
            stringBuilder.append(line);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        logger.error(e.getMessage());
    } finally {
        if (bufferedReader != null) {
            try {
                bufferedReader.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                logger.error(e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }
    return stringBuilder.toString();
}
0
InputStream  inputStream = null;
BufferedReader bufferedReader = null;
try {
    BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream));
    String stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    String content;
    while((content = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null){
        stringBuilder.append(content);
    }
    System.out.println("content of file::" + stringBuilder.toString());
}
catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }finally{           
            if(bufferedReader != null){
                try{
                    bufferedReader.close();
                }catch(IoException ex){
                   ex.printStackTrace();
            }
0

Also you can get InputStream from a specified resource path:

public static InputStream getResourceAsStream(String path)
{
    InputStream myiInputStream = ClassName.class.getResourceAsStream(path);
    if (null == myiInputStream)
    {
        mylogger.info("Can't find path = ", path);
    }

    return myiInputStream;
}

To get InputStream from a specific path:

public static URL getResource(String path)
{
    URL myURL = ClassName.class.getResource(path);
    if (null == myURL)
    {
        mylogger.info("Can't find resource path = ", path);
    }
    return myURL;
}
  • This does not answer the Question. – Stephen C Jan 16 at 13:27
0

I have created this code, and it works. There are no required external plug-ins.

There are convert String to Stream and Stream to String...

import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
import java.io.InputStream;

public class STRINGTOSTREAM {

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        String text = "Hello Bhola..!\nMy Name Is Kishan ";

        InputStream strm = new ByteArrayInputStream(text.getBytes());    // Convert String to Stream

        String data = streamTostring(strm);

        System.out.println(data);
    }

    static String streamTostring(InputStream stream)
    {
        String data = "";

        try
        {
            StringBuilder stringbuld = new StringBuilder();
            int i;
            while ((i=stream.read())!=-1)
            {
                stringbuld.append((char)i);
            }
            data = stringbuld.toString();
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            data = "No data Streamed.";
        }
        return data;
    }
  • nice one, thanks – parsecer May 13 at 23:49
0

Note: This probably isn't a good idea. This method uses recursion and thus will hit a StackOverflowError very quickly:

public String read (InputStream is) {
    byte next = is.read();
    return next == -1 ? "" : next + read(is); // Recursive part: reads next byte recursively
}

Please don't downvote this just because it's a bad choice to use; this was mostly creative :)

  • It is not just a bad choice. It will fail with a StackOverflowError if the input stream contains more than a few hundred characters. – Stephen C Jan 16 at 13:33
  • @StephenC That constitutes a bad choice in my opinion – HyperNeutrino Jan 16 at 16:30
  • I agree. It is a "bad choice" to use a method that doesn't work (except in trivial cases). But not just a "bad choice". Anyhow, I am down voting because this is wrong ... not because it is a "bad choice". And also because you don't explain why this approach should not be used. – Stephen C Jan 16 at 22:20
  • 1
    For the Java language and implementations, the absence of tail-call optimization is a deliberate design choice; see softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/272061/…. It should be viewed as inherent to Java. Certainly it is common to all extant mainstream Java implementations ... including Android. – Stephen C Jan 17 at 22:30
  • 1
    @parsecer because instead of running out when the RAM can't handle the memory being used, it dies when the stack can't handle more stack calls, which is a lot smaller of a number on any reasonable system. – HyperNeutrino May 14 at 18:20
0

I suggest the StringWriter class for that problem.

StringWriter wt= new StringWriter();
IOUtils.copy(inputStream, wt, encoding);
String st= wt.toString();
-1

I had log4j available, so I was able to use the org.apache.log4j.lf5.util.StreamUtils.getBytes to get the bytes, which I was able to convert into a string using the String ctor

String result = new String(StreamUtils.getBytes(inputStream));
  • 3
    -1. Just because something is available doesn't mean it should be used. When you switch the logging provider, you're going to have to replace this. Also, it looks like it is internal and shouldn't really be used outside of log4j. – robinst Aug 14 '14 at 5:51
-3
  InputStream IS=new URL("http://www.petrol.si/api/gas_prices.json").openStream();   

  ByteArrayOutputStream BAOS=new ByteArrayOutputStream();
  IOUtils.copy(IS, BAOS);
  String d= new String(BAOS.toByteArray(),"UTF-8");           

System.out.println(d);
  • See the commet by ChristofferHammarström in the answer by HarryLime. – Martin Schröder May 15 '13 at 15:23
  • There is nothing in the question that would remotely suggest to which charset to convert to or that the solution should be immune to any charset. – FK386 Jan 27 '17 at 16:06
  • An explanation would be in order. – Peter Mortensen Jan 5 at 10:38
-3

First, you have to know the encoding of string that you want to convert. Because the java.io.InputStream operates an underlying array of bytes, however, a string is composed by a array of character that needs an encoding, for example, UTF-8, the JDK will take the default encoding that is taken from

System.getProperty("file.encoding","UTF-8"); 

byte[] bytes=new byte[inputStream.available()];
inputStream.read(bytes);
String s = new String(bytes);

If inputStream's byte array is very big, you could do it in a loop.

  • 7
    From the javadocs: Note that while some implementations of InputStream will return the total number of bytes in the stream, many will not. It is never correct to use the return value of this method to allocate a buffer intended to hold all data in this stream. – tylermac Oct 6 '11 at 16:09
  • This is a bad idea! Don't be burnt by misunderstanding what available() gives you. – Drew Noakes Jan 1 '13 at 3:42
  • As mentioned above, available() is not the way to go. It's highly recommended to ignore this method so much so that you could treat this to be a restricted API. – asgs Aug 7 '13 at 3:10
  • There is also a String constructor which takes the encoding as a parameter, either by name or literally as a CharSet. – MauganRa Feb 16 '17 at 10:42
-9

Quick and easy:

String result = (String)new ObjectInputStream( inputStream ).readObject();
  • 1
    I get java.io.StreamCorruptedException: invalid stream header – XXL Jul 20 '12 at 11:13
  • 3
    ObjectInputStream is about deserialization, and the stream have to respect the serialization protocol to work, which may not always true in the context of this question. – Brice Apr 3 '13 at 14:17
  • An explanation would be in order. – Peter Mortensen Jan 5 at 10:37

protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:09

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