21

I have an interface with the following method

public interface IRemoteStore {

    <T> Optional<T> get(String cacheName, String key, String ... rest);

}

The instance of the class implementing the interface is called remoteStore.

When I mock this with mockito and use the method when:

Mockito.when(remoteStore.get("a", "b")).thenReturn("lol");

I get the error:

Cannot resolved the method 'thenReturn(java.lang.String)'

I thought it has to do with the fact that get returns an instance of the Optional class so I tried this:

Mockito.<Optional<String>>when(remoteStore.get("cache-name", "cache-key")).thenReturn
        (Optional.of("lol"));

But, I get this error instead:

when (Optional '<'String'>') in Mockito cannot be applied to (Optional'<'Object'>').

The only time it worked was with this:

String returnCacheValueString = "lol";
Optional<Object> returnCacheValue = Optional.of((Object) returnCacheValueString);
Mockito.<Optional<Object>>when(remotestore.get("cache-name", "cache-key")).thenReturn(returnCacheValue);

But above returns an instance of Optional '<'Object'>' and not Optional '<'String'>.

Why couldn't I just return an instance of Optional '<'String'>' directly? If I could, how should I go about doing that?

  • Aren't you missing a bracket in the first code chunk? – npe Jun 19 '15 at 19:50
  • 1
    Also FYI, don't confuse java.util.Optional with com.google.common.base.Optional, as the latter needs to be imported here. – jckuester Aug 18 '16 at 10:32
29

Mocks that return have the expectation that the return type matches the mocked object's return type.

Here's the mistake:

Mockito.when(remoteStore.get("a", "b")).thenReturn("lol");

"lol" isn't an Optional<String>, so it won't accept that as a valid return value.

The reason it worked when you did

Optional<Object> returnCacheValue = Optional.of((Object) returnCacheValueString);
Mockito.<Optional<Object>>when(remotestore.get("cache-name", "cache-key")).thenReturn(returnCacheValue);

is due to returnCacheValue being an Optional.

This is easy to fix: just change it to an Optional.of("lol") instead.

Mockito.when(remoteStore.get("a", "b")).thenReturn(Optional.of("lol"));

You can also do away with the type witnesses as well; the result above will be inferred to be Optional<String>.

  • Hey thanks for the reply. Yeah, I realized the error and did change it. What was wrong was that I didn't set my project language level to java 8. – Yu Lin Chen Jun 19 '15 at 21:01
  • I wouldn't have known that from reading your question. Optional is a class in Google Guava - a very popular third-party library - and it's compatible with Java 7. – Makoto Jun 19 '15 at 21:02
  • This is great! Wish I could give more upvotes. thenReturn(Optional.of("lol")); – Techiee Mar 26 at 23:28
  • @Yu Lin Chen - Could you please guide me here : stackoverflow.com/questions/56135373/… ? – PAA May 14 at 17:35
1

Not sure why you are seeing errors, but this compiles/runs error-free for me:

public class RemoteStoreTest {
    public interface IRemoteStore {
        <T> Optional<T> get(String cacheName, String key);
    }
    public static class RemoteStore implements IRemoteStore {
        @Override
        public <T> Optional<T> get(String cacheName, String key) {
            return Optional.empty();
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void testGet() {
        RemoteStore remoteStore = Mockito.mock(RemoteStore.class);

        Mockito.when( remoteStore.get("a", "b") ).thenReturn( Optional.of("lol") );
        Mockito.<Optional<Object>>when( remoteStore.get("b", "c") ).thenReturn( Optional.of("lol") );

        Optional<String> o1 = remoteStore.get("a", "b");
        Optional<Object> o2 = remoteStore.get("b", "c");

        Assert.assertEquals( "lol", o1.get() );
        Assert.assertEquals( "lol", o2.get() );
        Mockito.verify(remoteStore);
    }
}
  • Hey Don, thanks for the response. This made me realize that my IDE has the project language level set at java 7, not java 8. But I am using Optional from Guava, not Java 8 but that's a different question. Thank you. – Yu Lin Chen Jun 19 '15 at 20:53
  • 3
    Explaining why it works is better than saying that it does. The OP may not be the only person that has this problem; others may come in and have a similar question in the future. – Makoto Jun 19 '15 at 20:54

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