9

So I wrote a script where you can enter a number and the program will find the highest prime number in that range. The problem is that in PHP, this calculation is really slow with larger numbers, as compared to my JavaScript version, which is the exact same thing but much faster.

//Here Is the PHP code:
<form>
    <input type="text" name="input">
</form>

<?php
    $input = $_GET['input'];

    function Prime($num) 
    {
        if($num < 2)
            return false;

        for ($i = 2; $i < $num; $i++)
        {
            if($num % $i == 0)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    } 

    for($i = $input; $i > 0; $i--)
    {
        if(Prime($i))
            echo $i;

        if(Prime($i))
            exit();
    }
} 

Here is the JavaScript variant:

<html>
    <script>
        var input = prompt("Enter The Number");

        function Prime(num) {
            for (var i = 2; i < num; i++) {
                if(num % i == 0) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
            return true;
        }

        for(var i = input; i > 0; i--){
            if(Prime(i)){
                document.write(i);
            }
            if(Prime(i)){
                exit(); 
                p.thisbreaksthecode();
            }
        }
    </script>
</html>

For the JavaScript code, finding the highest prime in 99999999 takes 1.5 seconds. However, in PHP it takes a whopping 20 seconds. Considering the fact that apart from syntax, the two codes are exactly identical. This tells me something is wrong. What could be the reason for this slow calculation speed? Is it because of the way PHP works? How can I fix it?

10
  • 3
    The first question: Why do you calculate the prime twice? The second question: Have you read about "profiling"?
    – Sven
    Jun 19, 2015 at 23:22
  • You are comparing different runtimes and server/client programming. I guess that some kind of just in time compilation kicks in when your javascript engine executes.
    – collapsar
    Jun 19, 2015 at 23:22
  • Takes less than 2 seconds to execute on 3v4l.org if you don't calculate the prime twice; and that's without optimising the code in any way - 3v4l.org/hdXNM/perf#tabs
    – Mark Baker
    Jun 19, 2015 at 23:24
  • Calculating the prime twice? Can you specify which line? Jun 19, 2015 at 23:26
  • 2
    First line: if(Prime(i)){document.write(i)} Second line: if(Prime(i)){ exit(); and similarly in the PHP
    – Mark Baker
    Jun 19, 2015 at 23:29

2 Answers 2

5

What could be the reason for this slow calculation speed? Is it because of the way PHP works?

Probably; PHP doesn't (currently) do JIT optimisations, so running tight loops like that will be very painful.

How can I fix it?

By picking a better algorithm:

// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primality_test#PHP_implementation
function isPrime($n) 
{
    if ($n <= 3) {
        return $n > 1;
    } else if ($n % 2 === 0 || $n % 3 === 0) {
        return false;
    } else {
        for ($i = 5; $i * $i <= $n; $i += 6) {
            if ($n % $i === 0 || $n % ($i + 2) === 0) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
}

For your current input it runs 500x faster.

1
  • Wow, algorithm is everything. Thanks, I didn't expect that much increase in speed. Jun 21, 2015 at 5:24
0

You are clearly doing something wrong in the way you are running it.

I executed it (php -f calc.php) and it took very little:

<?php
$input = 9999999;

function Prime($num) {
    if($num < 2) return false;
    for ($i = 2; $i < $num; $i++) {
        if($num%$i==0)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

$start = microtime(true);
for($i = $input; $i > 0; $i--){
    if (Prime($i)){
        echo $i . PHP_EOL;
        echo (microtime(true) - $start) . PHP_EOL;
        exit;
    }
}

Takes less than a second to execute: 0.94304203987122

Now if you change $i++ to ++$i it goes down to: 0.67830395698547 (Pre-increment is faster than post-increment in PHP)

2
  • 9999999 is equal to 9999999, I think what you meant was 99999999
    – Mark B
    Jun 20, 2015 at 8:48
  • Yes, 9 with eight nines Jun 21, 2015 at 5:20

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