0

This is the code I am using to detect if a string contains letters. If none are detected, it allows the program to convert the string to a float. The idea was that I could stop the program from crashing after attempting to convert a string with letters to a float.

for i in range(1, len(argument)):
    if argument[i].isalpha():
        return False
        print("Ran option 1")
    else:
        return True
        print("Ran option 2")

The print lines are just to help me see which part is being executed. As it turns out, neither of them are.

http://puu.sh/ivVI7/8598b82fe8.png

This is a screenshot of the output. In the first half, it detects the "aa" string and does not crash the code. However, in the second half, it fails to detect the single "a" and attempts to convert it to a float, crashing the program. If anybody could lend a hand, it would be greatly appreciated.

If it helps, the rest of the code is here: http://pastebin.com/Cx7HbM4c

  • Please do not post images of plain text output. Copy the output into your post. – usr2564301 Jun 20 '15 at 12:22
  • Just use a try/except and catch a ValueError – Padraic Cunningham Jun 20 '15 at 12:24
2

Python strings are 0-based. The test never checks the first character in the string.

for i in range(0, len(argument)):

Filing that knowledge away, the python way (for char in argument) as shown in answers from @DeepSpace and @helmbert seems cleaner.

| improve this answer | |
  • That seems to have fixed it. Thank you! – Sam Cartwright Jun 20 '15 at 20:54
3

You have the print lines after the return command, so they will never be executed. Move the print above the return.

You can also make your code more pythonic and more readable:

for char in argument:
   return char.isalpha()
| improve this answer | |
1

In Python, arrays are zero-indexed. This means, you need to start iterating at 0, not at 1!

You can reproduce this easily by simply adding a print(argument[i]) into your loop body:

def func(argument):
    for i in range(1, len(argument)):
        print(argument[i])

func("a") # Prints nothing
func("ab") # Prints "b"

Keeping as closely as possible to your original code, simply start iterating at 0 instead of 1:

for i in range(0, len(argument):
    # ...

Easier yet, you can also iterate a string directly:

for character in argument:
    print(character) # Will print every single character
    # ...
| improve this answer | |
1

Ok, if you try to find out can you convert string or not, why don't you use function like this:

def convertable(value): 
    try: 
        float(value)
        return True
    except ValueError:
        return False
| improve this answer | |
0

if all you want is to prevent your program from crashing, exceptions are your friends:

argument = "abc"
try:
    value = float(argument)
except ValueError as e:
    print e, "is unacceptable"
else:
    print value, "is acceptable as a float"
finally:
    print "alright"

outputs:

could not convert string to float: abc is unacceptable
alright

whereas, if argument = "3.14" it outputs:

3.14 is acceptable as a float
alright

Of course, you can put all that logic into a function, in case you need to do it many times across your program. Have fun!

| improve this answer | |
  • The else and finally are not needed. – Padraic Cunningham Jun 20 '15 at 12:42
  • sure. I added them on purpose to show their behaviour so she/he can design her/his code properly. – Pynchia Jun 20 '15 at 12:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.