37

I was browsing the .NET Core source tree today and ran across this pattern in System.Collections.Immutable.ImmutableArray<T>:

T IList<T>.this[int index]
{
    get
    {
        var self = this;
        self.ThrowInvalidOperationIfNotInitialized();
        return self[index];
    }
    set { throw new NotSupportedException(); }
}

This pattern (storing this in a local variable) seems to be consistently applied in this file whenever this would otherwise be referenced multiple times in the same method, but not when it is only referenced once. So I started thinking about what the relative advantages might be to doing it this way; it seems to me that the advantage is likely performance-related, so I went down this route a little further... maybe I'm overlooking something else.

The CIL that gets emitted for the "store this in a local" pattern seems to look something like a ldarg.0, then ldobj UnderlyingType, then stloc.0 so that later references come from ldloc.0 instead of a bare ldarg.0 like it would be to just use this multiple times.

Maybe ldarg.0 is significantly slower than ldloc.0, but not by enough for either the C#-to-CIL translation or the JITter to look for opportunities to optimize this for us, such that it makes more sense to write this weird-looking pattern in C# code any time we would otherwise emit two ldarg.0 instructions in a struct instance method?

Update: or, you know, I could have looked at the comments at the top of that file, which explain exactly what's going on...

0

2 Answers 2

20

As you already noticed, System.Collections.Immutable.ImmutableArray<T> is a struct:

public partial struct ImmutableArray<T> : ...
{
    ...

    T IList<T>.this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            var self = this;
            self.ThrowInvalidOperationIfNotInitialized();
            return self[index];
        }
        set { throw new NotSupportedException(); }
    }

    ...

var self = this; creates a copy of the struct referred to by this. Why should it need to do that? The source comments of this struct give an explanation of why it is necessary:

/// This type should be thread-safe. As a struct, it cannot protect its own fields
/// from being changed from one thread while its members are executing on other threads
/// because structs can change in place simply by reassigning the field containing
/// this struct. Therefore it is extremely important that
/// ** Every member should only dereference this ONCE. **
/// If a member needs to reference the array field, that counts as a dereference of this.
/// Calling other instance members (properties or methods) also counts as dereferencing this.
/// Any member that needs to use this more than once must instead
/// assign this to a local variable and use that for the rest of the code instead.
/// This effectively copies the one field in the struct to a local variable so that
/// it is insulated from other threads.

In short, if it is possible that other threads are making changes to a field of the struct or changing the struct in place (by reassigning a class member field of this struct type, for example) while the get method is being executed and thus could cause bad side effects, then it becomes necessary for the get method to first make a (local) copy of the struct before processing it.

Update: Please also read supercats answer, which explains in detail which conditions must be fulfilled so that an operation like making a local copy of a struct (i.e. var self = this;) is being thread-safe, and what could happen if those conditions are not met.

17
  • 2
    @JoeAmenta, read the source code comments for that data type ("This type should be thread-safe. As a struct, it cannot protect its own fields from being changed from one thread while its members are executing on other threads because structs can change 'in place' simply by reassigning the field containing this struct."). Also note, that the class you were looking at was not perhaps always immutable (assuming it is indeed immutable which it does not seem to be according to the source comments) and the code you are seeing is just a "left-over" from an older revision... who knows...
    – user2819245
    Jun 20, 2015 at 18:17
  • 1
    @JoeAmenta, done, and i just noticed that the source comments actually contain a rather exhaustive explanation. When i wrote my last comment, i was just skimming over the source code comments without taking a closer look :)
    – user2819245
    Jun 20, 2015 at 18:36
  • 1
    @elgonzo it's actually more like L18-33 github.com/dotnet/corefx/blob/… (I've also edited the question to have this link as well which is why I deleted the comment you're replying to)
    – Joe Amenta
    Jun 20, 2015 at 18:37
  • 1
    @JoeAmenta, neat trick with this link. Didn't know that this is possible (i just copied the link from your question without looking at it). I'll update the link in my answer. But i will also keep the quote in the answer ( it took me so much work to include it :p) so people can read it without needing to follow the link...
    – user2819245
    Jun 20, 2015 at 18:44
  • 2
    @elgonzo The point is that even an immutable struct could be not-thread safe, because the whole struct could be changed in-place.
    – xanatos
    Jun 20, 2015 at 19:41
10

Structure instances in .NET are always mutable if the underlying storage location is mutable, and always immutable if the underlying storage location is immutable. It's possible for structure types to "pretend" to be immutable, but .NET will allow structure-type instances to be modified by anything that can write the storage locations in which they reside, and the structure types themselves have no say in the matter.

Thus, if one had a struct:

struct foo {
  String x;
  override String ToString() {
    String result = x;
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
    return result & "+" & x;
  }
  foo(String xx) { x = xx; }
}

and one were to invoke the following method on two threads with the same array myFoos of type foo[]:

myFoos[0] = new foo(DateTime.Now.ToString());
var st = myFoos[0].ToString();

it would be entirely possible that whichever thread started first would have its ToString() value report the time written by its constructor call and the time reported by the other thread's constructor call, rather than reporting the same string twice. For methods whose purpose is to validate a structure field and then use it, having the field change between the validation and the use would result in the method using an unvalidated field. Copying the contents of the structure's field (either by copying just the field, or by copying the whole structure) avoids that danger.

Note that for structures which contain a field of type Int64, UInt64, or Double, or which contain more than one field, it is possible that a statement like var temp=this; which occurs in one thread while another thread is overwriting the location where this had been stored, may end up copying a structure which holds an arbitrary mixture of old and new content. Only when a structure contains a single field of a reference type, or a single field of a 32-bit-or-smaller primitive, is it guaranteed that a read that occurs simultaneous with a write will yield some value that the structure actually held, and even that may have some quirks (e.g. at least in VB.NET, a statement like someField = New foo("george") may clear someField before calling the constructor).

7
  • Structure instances in .NET are always mutable if the underlying storage location is mutable, and always immutable if the underlying storage location is immutable. Sometimes things should be written in characters of fire in the sky, so that anyone can read them. Today is the first time I've discovered that an immutable struct could be not-thread safe... If I think enough it is clear... int64 can be subject to tearing (high and low part are modified not-at-the-same-time) if multiple threads read and write it at the same time... so it is clear that any struct could be subject to it.
    – xanatos
    Jun 20, 2015 at 20:19
  • @xanatos: A structure which contains a single field of reference type, or a single field of a "short" primitive type, will be immune to tearing. In many cases where it is necessary to wrap a single reference to an immutable instance of a mutable type, a struct may offer better performance and better semantics than a class [e.g. if BigInteger were a struct with a single field of type int[] (using the first few items of the array to hold things like cached hash value, etc.) then it would be possible for default(BigInteger) to behave as the value zero, rather than as a null reference.]
    – supercat
    Jun 20, 2015 at 20:37
  • Yep... the tearing is an intersecting class of problems to the one we are speaking about here... Still it is strange that, in the end, you can't even be sure that int.GetHashcode() is thread safe or not... (it is, because it is simply return this) but short.GetHashCode probably isn't, because it is: return (int)((ushort)this) | (int)this << 16;
    – xanatos
    Jun 20, 2015 at 20:41
  • I wonder why short.GetHashCode would be written like that rather than as unchecked(this*65537) [or better yet, some other value]? I can't think of cases where thread safety would matter on GetHashCode (rewriting a structure would invalidate any knowledge one has about its hash code anyway) but the fact that calling GetHashCode on a short could potentially yield a value not associated with any short value would seem odd.
    – supercat
    Jun 20, 2015 at 23:21
  • 1
    @AndrewArnott: Use of an interlocked read will only provide thread-safety with regard to interlocked writes. It will not provide thread safety with regard to "ordinary" rights. A mutable struct which holds an Int64 can be written to allow thread-safe reads and writes, provided that nobody tries to copy a struct while another thread is copying over it. Such thread-safety cannot be achieved with an "immutable" struct, because the only way to change its contents will be to use a non-interlocked structure copy operation.
    – supercat
    Jun 21, 2015 at 19:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.