20

In my example, I'm trying to extend the TS Window interface to include a polyfill for fetch. Why doesn't matter. The question is "how do I tell TS that window.fetch is a valid function?"

I'm doing this in VS Code, v.0.3.0 which is running TS v.1.5 (IIRC).

Declaring the interface inside my TS class file where I want to use it doesn't work:

///<reference path="typings/tsd.d.ts"/>

interface Window {
  fetch:(url: string, options?: {}) => Promise<any>
}
...
window.fetch('/blah').then(...); // TS objects that window doesn't have fetch

But it's OK if I declare this same interface in a separate ".d.ts" file and reference it in my TS class file.

Here is "typings/window.extend.d.ts"

///<reference path="es6-promise/es6-promise"/>
interface Window {
  fetch:(url: string, options?: {}) => Promise<any>
}

Now I can use it in my TS class file:

///<reference path="typings/window.extend.d.ts"/>
...
window.fetch('/blah').then(...); // OK

Alternatively, I can write an extending interface with another name in my TS class file and then use it in a cast:

interface WindowX extends Window {
  fetch:(url: string, options?: {}) => Promise<any>
}
...
(<WindowX> window).fetch('/blah').then(...); // OK

Why does extending the interface work in a "d.ts" but not in situ?

Do I really have to go through these gyrations?

  • A clarifying question .... What is the best way to accomplish extending an interface? I see pros and cons to both of these – John Papa Jun 21 '15 at 11:19
19

You need the declare global

declare global {
  interface Window {
    fetch:(url: string, options?: {}) => Promise<any>
  }
}

This works then:

window.fetch('/blah').then(...); 
  • 1
    Are you using webpack? For me, the things I declare globally in one module are not visible in other modules. Any clue? – mayid Jul 28 '17 at 0:15
15

When you have a top-level import or export in your file (which you must somewhere to be having this problem), your file is an external module.

In an external module, declaring an interface always creates a new type rather than augmenting an existing global interface. This mimics the general behavior of module loaders -- that things declared in this file don't merge or interfere with things in the global scope.

The reason for this gyration is that otherwise there wouldn't be a way to, in an external module, define new variables or types with the same name as those in the global scope.

  • Can you provide a link to some documentation on this issue? Perhaps the Declaration Merging wiki entry needs to be extended? – Stefan Hanke Jun 21 '15 at 4:51
  • 1
    I do have top-level import statements. What you say makes sense now that I understand. But I still don't know the pros/cons of the two approaches that worked or if there is a better 3rd way. I'm sure that extending window will be a common scenario that should be clearly documented. Declaration Merging surely needs elaboration ... especially since the interface Document example would not work in my use case! – Ward Jun 21 '15 at 5:38
  • 4
    We love typings when they are accurate. We loathe them when they are not. Having a clean path to extend them is important. Id like to know other options here too – John Papa Jun 21 '15 at 11:20
  • The clean way is to put them in another file. There's not really another way to indicate that you want to declare something in the global namespace. – Ryan Cavanaugh Jun 22 '15 at 0:06
  • 1
    It is possible to extend the window object from within an external module. See my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/40204572/274837 – Lucifer Sam Oct 23 '16 at 15:28

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