3

I have a query in native sql , something like :

SQLQuery query = session.createSQLQuery("select emp_id, emp_name, emp_salary from Employee");

the query result can be used to set the employee object . On the similar lines , i have the same query appended with addscalar(entity_colname).

query = session.createSQLQuery("select emp_id, emp_name, emp_salary from Employee")
        .addScalar("emp_id", new LongType())
        .addScalar("emp_name", new StringType())
        .addScalar("emp_salary", new DoubleType());

here also we have to obtain the result in the similar way , then what is the advantage of using addscalar?

Regards Jay

2
  • It improves the performance if you are processing large volume of data. Both of them returns Object array.
    – ganeshvjy
    Jun 22 '15 at 3:27
  • Which you helps you to cast from object to our specified type ..
    – Rookie007
    Jun 22 '15 at 3:40
1

When you don't need addScalar

In your example, you don't really need to use addScalar.

If you map the response to a DTO, like the following EmployeeDTO:

public class EmployeeDTO {
    private final Long id;
    private final String name;
    private final Double salary;

    public EmployeeDTO(Long id, String name, Double salary) {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
        this.salary = salary;
    }

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public Double getSalary() {
        return salary;
    }
}

Then, the following SQL query could fetch the EmployeeDTO just fine:

List<EmployeeDTO> employeeDTOs = entityManager
.createNativeQuery(
    "SELECT " +
    "   emp_id AS id, " +
    "   emp_name AS name, " +
    "   emp_salary AS salary " +
    "FROM employee ")
.getResultList();

Notice that we used column aliases so that Hibernate can match the DTO property we want to set.

When you need addScalar

Assuming you have a Book entity that has a JSON properties attribute:

@Entity(name = "Book")
@Table(name = "book")
@TypeDef(typeClass = JsonNodeBinaryType.class, defaultForType = JsonNode.class)
public static class Book {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @NaturalId
    private String isbn;

    @Column(columnDefinition = "jsonb")
    private JsonNode properties;

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getIsbn() {
        return isbn;
    }

    public void setIsbn(String isbn) {
        this.isbn = isbn;
    }

    public JsonNode getProperties() {
        return properties;
    }

    public void setProperties(JsonNode properties) {
        this.properties = properties;
    }
}

The JsonNodeBinaryType is provided by the hibernate-types open-source project.

Now, when executing a native SQL query which fetched the JSON properties column:

JsonNode properties = (JsonNode) entityManager
.createNativeQuery(
    "SELECT properties " +
    "FROM book " +
    "WHERE isbn = :isbn")
.setParameter("isbn", "978-9730228236")
.getSingleResult();

Hibernate throws the following exception:

org.hibernate.MappingException: No Dialect mapping for JDBC type: 1111

This is because Hibernate does not know how to transform the jsonb column to a JsonNode Java object since it lacks a Hibernate-native JSON Type.

But if we call addScalar and provide the Hibernate Type:

JsonNode properties = (JsonNode) entityManager
.createNativeQuery(
    "SELECT properties " +
    "FROM book " +
    "WHERE isbn = :isbn")
.setParameter("isbn", "978-9730228236")
.unwrap(org.hibernate.query.NativeQuery.class)
.addScalar("properties", JsonNodeBinaryType.INSTANCE)
.getSingleResult();

Then the query will run just fine!

2
  • this can be done using addentity as well, but what advantage does addscalar provide ? Jun 22 '15 at 18:07
  • There is only the slight advantage of resolving the parameter type. But the advantages is only marginal as in reality setParameter works just as good. Jun 22 '15 at 19:21

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