10

The code which is common for both the implementations:

from math import sqrt

def factors(x):
    num = 2
    sq = int(sqrt(x))
    for i in range(2, sq):
        if (x % i) == 0:
            num += 2
    return num + ((1 if sq == sqrt(x) else 2) if x % sq == 0 else 0)

1. Implementation which doesn't make use of a generator function:

i = 1
while True:
    if factors(i * (i+1) * 0.5) > 500:
        print(int(i * (i+1) * 0.5))
        break
    i += 1

2. Implementation which makes use of a generator function:

def triangle():
    i = 1
    while True:
        yield int(0.5 * i * (i + 1))
        i += 1

t = triangle()

while True:
    num = t.__next__()
    if factors(num) > 500:
        print(num)
        break

The Question:

The first implementation takes about 4 seconds while the second one takes approximately 8.2 seconds. Why is there such a big difference between the run times of the two implementations?

7
  • 1
    Does it matter that it's a generator function, or is this just another case of Python code is faster when you put it in a function?
    – BrenBarn
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:05
  • 8
    The first implementation takes about 4 seconds while the second one takes approximately 8.2 seconds - so is your post title correct, or are the order of your code blocks correct? Jun 22, 2015 at 7:06
  • The implementation with generator is faster and takes around 4 seconds Jun 22, 2015 at 7:21
  • @SaratAdusumilli: My question isn't about which implementation makes conceptual sense. If you take your first implementation and put the whole while True thing into a function, is it faster? If so, the difference doesn't have to do with using a generator function, but just with using a function, as described in the post I linked to.
    – BrenBarn
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:24
  • @BrenBarn I believe the only (good) way to write the above program using a function instead of a generator function would be by making use of a variable defined in the module. This would run slower than the one with a generator function. A generator function is perfect for this program. I don't think there would be much of a difference when you put the code in a function. (The difference is in milliseconds in the question you linked to.) Jun 22, 2015 at 7:29

4 Answers 4

11

temp1():

def temp1():
        i = 1
        while True:
            if factors(i * (i+1) * 0.5) > 500:
                print(int(i * (i+1) * 0.5))
                break
            i += 1

temp2():

def temp2():
    def triangle():
        i = 1
        while True:
            yield int(0.5 * i * (i + 1))
            i += 1

    t = triangle()

    while True:
        num = t.next()
        if factors(num) > 500:
            print(num)
            break

cProfile for both:

enter image description here After changing the factors call in temp1() to factors(int(...)), It turns out that temp1() takes the similar time

Modified temp1 to pass int rather than float:

def temp1():
    i = 1
    while True:
        if factors(int(i * (i+1) * 0.5)) > 500:
            print(int(i * (i+1) * 0.5))
            break
        i += 1

enter image description here

So it turns out that in your first implementation you are passing float to the factors() and floating point arithmetic is complex than integer arithmetic

Why Floating point operations are complex??

Because the way floats are represented internally is different from ints, they are represented in 3 parts as sign , mantissa and exponent (IEEE 754) whereas representation of integer is much simple and so are operations like addition and subtraction on integers, even multiplication and division are performed using a combination of addition,subtraction and shift operations internally . since integer addition and subtraction are simple, so are their division/multiplications and hence floating point operations are some what expensive

Why Floating point modulo is expensive than Integer?

The answer is same as above , A modulo operation is nothing but combination of primitive operations mentioned above as follows:

a mod n = a - (n*int(a/n))

Since primitive operations for floats are more expensive, so is modulo for floats

2
  • Why is the modulo operation more expensive on float than on int? Jun 22, 2015 at 7:55
  • @SaratAdusumilli , I've updated the answer stating why modulo operation on float is more expensive , check it out :) Jun 22, 2015 at 9:16
8

In the explicit case you're not taking the int of the expression before calling factors and therefore the value passed will be a floating-point number.

In the generator case you're instead yielding int(...), calling factors passing an integer number.

6
  • 1
    Timed it, removing the cast from the generator makes the two implementations run in almost identical time.
    – samgak
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:32
  • @6502 - it would be great if you could explain why operations on float are more expensive from operations on int.
    – matino
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:40
  • @SaratAdusumilli it's most likely the modulo operation that occurs inside the loop and not the sqrt that is taking most of the extra time in the case of floats
    – samgak
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:42
  • @samgak You are right it is actually the modulo operation on float which is more expensive. But when it comes the sqrt float is actually faster than the int. Jun 22, 2015 at 7:54
  • 1
    @SaratAdusumilli: In Python the modulo operator on floats provides a functionality that is not present in C. See stackoverflow.com/a/14763891/320726
    – 6502
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:59
3

You can remove factors() of the code, make 500 much larger.

# implementation 1
i = 1
while True:
    if (i * (i + 1) * 0.5) > n: # n=100000
        # print int(i * (i + 1) * 0.5),
        break
    i += 1

and %timeit, to compare with implementation 2:

def triangle():
    i = 1
    while True:
        yield i * (i + 1) * 0.5
        i += 1

t = triangle()

while True:
    num = t.next()
    if num > n:
        # print num,
        break
1
  • I don't think the generator function is what really matter
    – LittleQ
    Jun 22, 2015 at 7:32
2

The only difference as far as I know is that you do the calculation i * (i+1) * 0.5 twice in the first example. It is not a expensive computation, but it might make a big difference since it is such a big portion of the program..

2
  • The calculation occurs twice only in one case and it doesn't make much of a difference to the performance. Jun 22, 2015 at 7:15
  • True, I did not realize that there was a break there. And I did not take a close enough look at factors. My bad.
    – Binnut
    Jun 23, 2015 at 9:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.