11

I'm currently working on a report that shows me all postcodes covered by our sales team.

Each team covers over 100 postcodes. What I would like to do is create a report that brings back the clients within the postcode. Currently, my code looks like this.

SELECT * FROM tbl_ClientFile
 WHERE CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('B79%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB1%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB10%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB11%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB12%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB18%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB2%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB3%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB4%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB5%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB6%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB8%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB9%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB94%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD1%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD10%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD11%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD12%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD13%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD14%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD15%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD16%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD17%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD18%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD19%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD2%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD20%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD21%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD22%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD3%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD4%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD5%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD6%')

What I was hoping for is that there is a faster and easier way of doing this. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Is there a way to create a variable for each sales Team like @SalesTeam1 = SELECT * FROM tbl_ClientFile WHERE POSTCODE1 like '' or like ''

Just fishing for ideas really. Cheers

7
  • 3
    Why not just have a table that relates a team and their post codes? You could then solve this with a simple inner join.
    – Luaan
    Jun 22, 2015 at 8:59
  • @Luaan +1, But as it looks, I would go for a Town table AND a Team_Town relationship table : as it looks, there's even no Town table. Jun 22, 2015 at 9:01
  • I did think about creating a table for this and then doing an inner join. The problem is that the team is dynamic they are constantly changing the areas that they cover. So for one week they might cover Devon then the next week they cover all the post codes in Swindon. Jun 22, 2015 at 9:07
  • 1
    Note that you have a lot of redundancy in your conditions... Eg. BD10% to BD19% are covered by the condition BD1%
    – Captain
    Jun 22, 2015 at 9:25
  • 1
    Then you should build a table with 2 columns Town, PostCode, or may add the Country if applicable.
    – Eric
    Jun 22, 2015 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

9

WITH CTE AS
(
SELECT VALUE
FROM (
        VALUES ('B79'), ('BB1'), ('BB10'), ('BB11'), ('BB12'), ('BB18'), ('BB2'), ('BB3'), ('BB4'), ('BB5'), ('BB6'), ('BB8'), ('BB9'), ('BB94'), ('BD1'), ('BD10'), ('BD11'), ('BD12'), ('BD13'), ('BD14'),
                ('BD15'), ('BD16'), ('BD17'), ('BD18'), ('BD19'), ('BD2'), ('BD20'), ('BD21'), ('BD22'), ('BD3'), ('BD4'), ('BD5'), ('BD6')
     ) V(VALUE)
)   

SELECT * FROM tbl_ClientFile T WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT TOP 1 1 FROM CTE WHERE T.CLNTPOST1 LIKE CTE.VALUE + '%')

6

One of possible solutions. Create a table Prefix(v varchar(4)) where you insert those values. Then a solution would be:

SELECT * 
FROM tbl_ClientFile cf
JOIN Prefix p on cf.CLNTPOST1 LIKE p.v + '%'

To exclude duplicates if some prefix includes some another prefix like BB1, BB10, BB15...:

SELECT DISTINCT cf.* 
FROM tbl_ClientFile cf
JOIN Prefix p on cf.CLNTPOST1 LIKE p.v + '%'
6
  • 1
    The join will create a product of 2 tables, which will return the unwanted duplicate rows. Should have use EXISTS() in where condition
    – Eric
    Jun 22, 2015 at 9:18
  • @eric, do you really think that one CLNTPOST1 can begin simultaneously from BD14 and BB10? It would be true if I use % from both side of prefix.... Jun 22, 2015 at 9:22
  • 1
    Let say BB10 it can match to BB1% and BB10%, where BB10 is a valid post code.
    – Eric
    Jun 22, 2015 at 9:29
  • I didnt even see that thanks for spotting it. So i would be getting duplicates based on OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD1%') OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD10%') It will bring back BD1% and anything after and BD10% Jun 22, 2015 at 9:30
  • @Eric, yes this is correct. But I think it should match those prefixes if they match and show with appropriate prefixes. Jun 22, 2015 at 9:35
4

Most of your likes are already covered by other likes. You can use likes with multiple values like this and get the same result:

SELECT * FROM tbl_ClientFile
WHERE 
  CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('B79%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BB[12345689]%')
  OR CLNTPOST1 LIKE ('BD[1-6]%')

If you check for CLNTPOST1 is like BB1%, then you don't have to check for BB11% OR BB12%

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