56

okay, this is probably going to be in the prelude, but: is there a standard library function for finding the unique elements in a list? my (re)implementation, for clarification, is:

has :: (Eq a) => [a] -> a -> Bool
has [] _ = False
has (x:xs) a
  | x == a    = True
  | otherwise = has xs a

unique :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [a]
unique [] = []
unique (x:xs)
  | has xs x  = unique xs
  | otherwise = x : unique xs
4
  • 12
    Your has is also standard; it's just flip elem. – Nefrubyr Jun 23 '10 at 8:19
  • 4
    Or even has xs = (`elem` xs). – yatima2975 Jun 23 '10 at 9:08
  • @yatima2975 why are you using elem as infix? – dopatraman Jun 9 '16 at 2:07
  • @dopatraman Because elem has type Eq a => a -> [a] -> Bool so using it as an infix operation section makes xs the second argument. (`elem` xs) is desugared to (\x -> elem x xs) which is what we want here! – yatima2975 Jun 10 '16 at 9:26
57

The nub function from Data.List (no, it's actually not in the Prelude) definitely does something like what you want, but it is not quite the same as your unique function. They both preserve the original order of the elements, but unique retains the last occurrence of each element, while nub retains the first occurrence.

You can do this to make nub act exactly like unique, if that's important (though I have a feeling it's not):

unique = reverse . nub . reverse

Also, nub is only good for small lists. Its complexity is quadratic, so it starts to get slow if your list can contain hundreds of elements.

If you limit your types to types having an Ord instance, you can make it scale better. This variation on nub still preserves the order of the list elements, but its complexity is O(n * log n):

import qualified Data.Set as Set

nubOrd :: Ord a => [a] -> [a] 
nubOrd xs = go Set.empty xs where
  go s (x:xs)
   | x `Set.member` s = go s xs
   | otherwise        = x : go (Set.insert x s) xs
  go _ _              = []

In fact, it has been proposed to add nubOrd to Data.Set.

5
  • 1
    Arguably its best to simply leave it as a set instead of using a list in the first place – alternative Oct 16 '13 at 13:27
  • 1
    Let's be honest: nub isn't good for any list. Even on the list with 2 elements nubOrd is faster. – nh2 Jan 13 '16 at 14:43
  • This is kind of like a "map sieve" similar to the impure "hash sieve". – CMCDragonkai Sep 23 '16 at 15:34
  • There was a typo in a function type signature. Should be Ord a. Also, I've found that nubOrd suprisingly (or not) isn't really better than nub in my case. It was even slower. Probably because there was not much duplicate values (though introducing nub cut running times in half, nub ord was about 20% slower than just nub). – Dan M. Oct 23 '16 at 21:51
  • @alternative, functions on lists can be more generally useful than the equivalent on sets by maintaining the order of items. This can be very important. – codeshot Oct 7 '17 at 10:05
99

I searched for (Eq a) => [a] -> [a] on Hoogle.

First result was nub (remove duplicate elements from a list).

Hoogle is awesome.

5
  • 1
    Also, you can provide you own equality function like this : nubBy :: (a -> a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] – jd.k Jun 23 '10 at 10:22
  • And if Bart ever gets time we might see a nubOrd, which will be more reasonable performance wise. – Thomas M. DuBuisson Jun 24 '10 at 7:16
  • 2
    It's worth saying that the nub function is from Data.List package. – Dmitry Ginzburg Oct 7 '14 at 21:25
  • @Thomas: Data.List.Unique has sortUniq, which is the "nubOrd" you're requesting. I'd rather have a (Eq a, Hashable a) => [a] -> [a] which would be even more reasonable, performance-wise... – Jon Watte Nov 7 '15 at 19:26
  • Up till now, I was really struggling to understand how to effectively use Hoogle, never thought of searching for the type signature I am looking for – Andre Helberg Aug 16 '16 at 20:44
12
import Data.Set (toList, fromList)
uniquify lst = toList $ fromList lst
1
  • 5
    This changes the order of the elements. – sjakobi Jul 22 '16 at 22:13
4

I think that unique should return a list of elements that only appear once in the original list; that is, any elements of the orginal list that appear more than once should not be included in the result.

May I suggest an alternative definition, unique_alt:

    unique_alt :: [Int] -> [Int]
    unique_alt [] = []
    unique_alt (x:xs)
        | elem x ( unique_alt xs ) = [ y | y <- ( unique_alt xs ), y /= x ]
        | otherwise                = x : ( unique_alt xs )

Here are some examples that highlight the differences between unique_alt and unqiue:

    unique     [1,2,1]          = [2,1]
    unique_alt [1,2,1]          = [2]

    unique     [1,2,1,2]        = [1,2]
    unique_alt [1,2,1,2]        = []

    unique     [4,2,1,3,2,3]    = [4,1,2,3]
    unique_alt [4,2,1,3,2,3]    = [4,1]
1
  • That is in fact the definition of Data.List.Unique (unique) although personally, I've never run unto that use case, whereas the "squash lists to contain only one of duplicates" function is bread-and-butter of many operations. – Jon Watte Nov 7 '15 at 19:28
2

I think this would do it.

unique [] = []
unique (x:xs) = x:unique (filter ((/=) x) xs)
0

Another way to remove duplicates:

unique :: [Int] -> [Int]
unique xs = [x | (x,y) <- zip xs [0..], x `notElem` (take y xs)]
0

Algorithm in Haskell to create a unique list:

data Foo = Foo { id_ :: Int
               , name_ :: String
               } deriving (Show)

alldata = [ Foo 1 "Name"
          , Foo 2 "Name"
          , Foo 3 "Karl"
          , Foo 4 "Karl"
          , Foo 5 "Karl"
          , Foo 7 "Tim"
          , Foo 8 "Tim"
          , Foo 9 "Gaby"
          , Foo 9 "Name"
          ]

isolate :: [Foo] -> [Foo]
isolate [] = []
isolate (x:xs) = (fst f) : isolate (snd f)
  where
    f = foldl helper (x,[]) xs
    helper (a,b) y = if name_ x == name_ y
                     then if id_ x >= id_ y
                          then (x,b)
                          else (y,b)
                     else (a,y:b)

main :: IO ()
main = mapM_ (putStrLn . show) (isolate alldata)

Output:

Foo {id_ = 9, name_ = "Name"}
Foo {id_ = 9, name_ = "Gaby"}
Foo {id_ = 5, name_ = "Karl"}
Foo {id_ = 8, name_ = "Tim"}

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